Regional Differences

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I know without a reason of a doubt that if I have southuhners at my table and serve biscuits they will only eat them with their meal, not before, not on the side, with.  I tested my theory this morning, my super cute 50th anniv couple from TN. Hot out of the oven - get em while their hot! Nope, waited til the main meal came.  

British breakfast customs are down pat here. They always complain about American Breakfasts, tell us they only eat cornflakes at home (yeah so do I, but this is a B&B) and eat every drop. I remind them of their "fry up" they try to pawn off on us when we visit their country. 

What regional things have you found, either in your new location or guests from a different area? 

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Eric PB&J is cheap, was cheap. That's what us po-fokes ate for lunch.    Around here the kids show up with a cold biscuit in their lunch, or gvmt lunches.

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JB, growing up, we weren't rich. Take my word for it. And my mother was a HORRIBLE cook. We ate lots of PB&J, but the J around here was always jam, we called it jelly, but it was always jam. We didn't have jelly. 

There was one product that was premixed already in stripes, like the American Goobers, but I just don't remember what brand it was, because we didn't have any products from Smuckers. And the biggest name in PB in Canada was always Kraft. They were also number one in jam in Canada. 

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Eric Arthur Blair wrote:

JB, growing up, we weren't rich. Take my word for it. And my mother was a HORRIBLE cook. We ate lots of PB&J, but the J around here was always jam, we called it jelly, but it was always jam. We didn't have jelly. 

There was one product that was premixed already in stripes, like the American Goobers, but I just don't remember what brand it was, because we didn't have any products from Smuckers. And the biggest name in PB in Canada was always Kraft. They were also number one in jam in Canada. 

Vegemite is kraft.

Grape Jelly made from the juice, is the cheapest "Jam" that is why I mentioned that.

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 They used to have vegemite around here. We never had jelly at all, other than mint.

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Joey Bloggs wrote:

Eric PB&J is cheap, was cheap. That's what us po-fokes ate for lunch.    Around here the kids show up with a cold biscuit in their lunch, or gvmt lunches.

I never knew we were poor until I went to high school and other kids had big houses and lots of clothes.

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Madeleine wrote:

Joey Bloggs wrote:

Eric PB&J is cheap, was cheap. That's what us po-fokes ate for lunch.    Around here the kids show up with a cold biscuit in their lunch, or gvmt lunches.

I never knew we were poor until I went to high school and other kids had big houses and lots of clothes.

Oddly enough the poorest kids here have the most expensive clothes. (speaking of the peer pressure at my kids high school). Even Dh in his school uniforms growing up compared shoe brands.  Oh wait, you said UNTIL in high school. Yeah my kids WANTED to buy the walmart clothes here in elementary as the other kids had the same! I was thrilled by that. Smiling

PB&J is standard fare.  Now they delivery pizza to the schools.  Dh never had meat in any sandwich (vegemite or peanut butter), but never meat. 

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Euros are also surprised that the milk is in the fridge and are not overly happy that it makes their tea or coffee cooler than they are used to. They tend to use the mini moos rather than the cream that's on ice. There is also a tendency to leave the milk on the counter after they use it rather than put it back in the fridge. 

And they want much, much smaller portions. If they see the breakfast going by they almost all stop me and ask for much less, 'Only one pancake (or french toast), please.' Or half an omelet. Or one egg.

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Was reminded of another one this morning- no sausage with breakfast for Germans. She was aghast and said so, in German, 'Sausage! In the morning?!' and I replied to her, in English, 'That's how we do it here.' She was embarrassed that I understood her. With the face she made, what else could she have been saying? It wasn't too hard to figure it out.

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Canadians: coffee with breakfast; tea after dinner

Brits: tea with breakfast; coffee after dinner (and not decaf!)

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happyjacks wrote:

Canadians: coffee with breakfast; tea after dinner

Brits: tea with breakfast; coffee after dinner (and not decaf!)

None of my Brits have tea with breakfast. They have afternoon tea, or even a cup before breakfast, but then launch into the coffee. Tons of sugar and cream, of course. Smiling

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My Brits today told me they pinched the mugs.  I saw a puzzled look on the TN couples face at that.

I took my girls to a show and dinner at our favorite Chinese restaurant last night. Always fresh hot flavorful and great service.

The waiter came to the table and looked at the girls specifically and said "I hope you enjoy your food very much" and bowed and walked away.  It was adorable.

So this morning I told this story and said it to the table. No one got it. No one smiled or anything.  Sometimes there are people who have to be the "witty" ones, where everything they say has to be witty, to the annoyance of everyone else, and it they are not the witty one, then they won't laugh at anyone else's wit. Just an observation.  "Beautiful day! 75 today, blue skies"  reply - "well the sun is always shining on the righteous"  

Trust me I like to laugh and I love humor. Just not off sided seemingly self "witty" comments after every thing you say.

Okay got that off my chest...bye!

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No one here eats ketchup with their eggs... I don't have any in the house and it is strictly verbotten to bring it into the house.... childhood trauma. The closest thing in the house is hot sauce and that's what you get if you ask me for ketchup. And only Americans have ever asked me for ketchup.

Only Americans ever ask me for lemon for their tea.

The British like their cereal with their breakfast. Often sacrificing having my famous hot breakfast dishes.

The French often ask me for hot milk for their coffee.

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Eric Arthur Blair wrote:

Only Americans ever ask me for lemon for their tea.

What about iced tea?

In Ireland last year we stayed at a B&B near the Shannon airport and, being hot and tired from a day on the road, my sister asked for iced tea. The owner said she'd never made that before, but she'd give it a try. She eventually brought a pitcher of tea with 2 little ice cubes in it.

We expressed our gratitude. 'Twas better than nothing, I guess.

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Refigerators are smaller in Europe. We grew up with a few ice cubes in cold drinks. I don't understand the habit here in the US of filling the entire glass full of ice and getting only a little drink.  Would rather have a couple of ice cubes and a glass of what I'm drinking. Never got used to that here.

When I first moved back I also could not understand the compulsion of adults here wanting straws in everything they drank. Finally realized with all the ice in the dang glass you need a straw to be able to drink out of it!

RIki 

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 We hardly ever use ice for water or drinks. The water from the tap is cool in the summer and stone cold in the winter. We always order drinks without ice and well we get more drink for the money and the ice just dilutes it... until we were in Florida one summer and got served a very very warm Diet Coke.

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egoodell wrote:

We grew up with a few ice cubes in cold drinks. I don't understand the habit here in the US of filling the entire glass full of ice and getting only a little drink. 

I agree, I hate it when they put ice to the top of the glass then it only holds about a cup of liquid. But there's a happy medium. In Europe, if you ask for ice, it's still common to get two, at most three, small ice cubes in a cold drink, resulting in a drink that's just cool, not cold. Give me half a glass of ice and I'll be happy.

I've argued this with my European friends many times. I've even heard them claim that it's not healthy to drink ice cold drinks. I said, you eat ice cream, don't you? It's frozen. They agreed, and said they hadn't thought of it that way. Personal preferences rely on what you're used to, what you're raised on.

I'll never forget once when we went to the Memphis airport to pick up my aunt from New York. We stopped to eat on the way home and she ordered tea to drink. She pitched a fit when they brought her iced tea, saying if she'd wanted iced tea, she'd have asked for it. In the south, if you ask for tea, iced is assumed.

In fact, in the last couple of years here, the word tea is no longer even mentioned at restaurants. When they ask what you'll have to drink, you just answer "sweet" or "unsweet" and they know what you mean.

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 Central Pennsylvanians (home of the whoopie pie, no matter what those Maineiacs say) eat ketchup on their eggs.  I had to correct someone who thought it was a West Virginia thing when I offered it.  We always put out hot sauce for eggs and apple butter from our local fire department when we have toast.

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Perhaps it bled over the border like redd up did, but we did ketchup on eggs in WV northern panhandle also.

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In spain they eat strawberry Jelly (Jam) on their jacket potatoes.

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The first time I had peanut butter and jelly in the US as a child, I wouldn't eat it. It was so odd to us to have peanut butter and grape jelly. Heck, we didn't even have grape jelly at home. It was always strawberry, raspberry or marmalade.

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I started keeping grape jelly on hand after so many guests asked for it. Now, I haven't opened the jar in months. Strawberry, raspberry and marmalade. Top 3 every time. However, PB&J, with grape jelly is/was a staple kid food here. Now kids can't have peanuts anywhere around them unless they're at home so it is disappearing off menus everywhere. Cream cheese and grape jelly was another childhood staple.

Never knew there was any other kind of jelly but grape until my first restaurant at age 16 and they had them in little packs on the table. All different flavors. Amazing.

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My Cocoa Raspberry is quite popular.

I don't own grape, never have. I haven't ever owned any, either. That's right, if Welch's relied on me, they would be in bankruptcy already.

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KETCHUP a USA thing ??  Last few years been putting it in refrigerators in my B&B Cottages. Guest requested I do so . Some put it on almost all breakfast food.

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Joey Bloggs wrote:

I know without a reason of a doubt that if I have southuhners at my table and serve biscuits they will only eat them with their meal, not before, not on the side, with.   

Never heard of eating a biscuit alone before the meal, unless you're at Red Lobster. You eat breakfast biscuits with the breakfast.

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Arkansawyer wrote:

Joey Bloggs wrote:

I know without a reason of a doubt that if I have southuhners at my table and serve biscuits they will only eat them with their meal, not before, not on the side, with.   

Never heard of eating a biscuit alone before the meal, unless you're at Red Lobster. You eat breakfast biscuits with the breakfast.

This is the regional difference Joey meant...if someone put a plate full of warm biscuits in front of me, gone. No waiting for anything else. Everyone else (Southerners) is waiting for the GRAVY they expect to be forthcoming and if they eat their biscuit ahead of time what are they going to sop that gravy with?

I do not expect gravy (!) with my breakfast, so hand over the biscuit, the butter and the jam. I am good to go.

Other regional dfferences in re biscuits (and not in the making of them, that's a book in and of itself) is that almost every person we have had from TN wants honey for the biscuits. They come looking for it and run off with the honey bear from the tea service.

Hot sauce for eggs for TX.

Oddly, I cannot say that pork (sausage, bacon) is wanted across the board from those south of the Mason-Dixon line.

CA surprises me when they say they want pork. (They must be transplants!)

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Madeleine wrote:

Arkansawyer wrote:

Joey Bloggs wrote:

I know without a reason of a doubt that if I have southuhners at my table and serve biscuits they will only eat them with their meal, not before, not on the side, with.   

Never heard of eating a biscuit alone before the meal, unless you're at Red Lobster. You eat breakfast biscuits with the breakfast.

This is the regional difference Joey meant...if someone put a plate full of warm biscuits in front of me, gone. No waiting for anything else. Everyone else (Southerners) is waiting for the GRAVY they expect to be forthcoming and if they eat their biscuit ahead of time what are they going to sop that gravy with?

I do not expect gravy (!) with my breakfast, so hand over the biscuit, the butter and the jam. I am good to go.

Other regional dfferences in re biscuits (and not in the making of them, that's a book in and of itself) is that almost every person we have had from TN wants honey for the biscuits. They come looking for it and run off with the honey bear from the tea service.

Hot sauce for eggs for TX.

Oddly, I cannot say that pork (sausage, bacon) is wanted across the board from those south of the Mason-Dixon line.

CA surprises me when they say they want pork. (They must be transplants!)

While I guess biscuits and gravy is a southern thang, not all southerners are waiting for gravy!!!  We don't eat biscuits with gravy every day!  Some times we like them slathered with butter and homemade jam or they are waiting for that sausage or bacon to appear to make it a sandwich.  Others, like me just like to eat their biscuits with their meal.   Now if there is gravy, yes siree bob it will be poured over those busicuts faster than a NY second!

Getting back to the main topic, could it be that these people just would prefer to wait to eat their bread with or after the main course so they don't fill up on bread????

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Madeleine wrote:

Arkansawyer wrote:

Joey Bloggs wrote:

I know without a reason of a doubt that if I have southuhners at my table and serve biscuits they will only eat them with their meal, not before, not on the side, with.   

Never heard of eating a biscuit alone before the meal, unless you're at Red Lobster. You eat breakfast biscuits with the breakfast.

This is the regional difference Joey meant...if someone put a plate full of warm biscuits in front of me, gone. No waiting for anything else. Everyone else (Southerners) is waiting for the GRAVY they expect to be forthcoming and if they eat their biscuit ahead of time what are they going to sop that gravy with?

I do not expect gravy (!) with my breakfast, so hand over the biscuit, the butter and the jam. I am good to go.

Other regional dfferences in re biscuits (and not in the making of them, that's a book in and of itself) is that almost every person we have had from TN wants honey for the biscuits. They come looking for it and run off with the honey bear from the tea service.

Hot sauce for eggs for TX.

Oddly, I cannot say that pork (sausage, bacon) is wanted across the board from those south of the Mason-Dixon line.

CA surprises me when they say they want pork. (They must be transplants!)

Apple butter.

Calf are hot sauce heads as well, since it was, ahem, and is essentially mexico. Tabasco is on every table at every diner, everywhere. It is what it is. Yes I had hot sauce on the table this morning as well.  

Calf is on a whole conservative, every day people, so picking out pockets of hollyweird, Bay area, etc will bring you the no glutten vegan earthie fetish diets. The rest of the state, hard to believe, are normal.  Smiling

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Just got back from the Apple Butter Festival with a case of pints! give me hot biscuits any time with butter, jam, or honey - I am READY!! Unless it is after coming home from working the polls (up at 4 AM) and getting home at 8:30 PM to hear the asking voice say, "I need some of those biscuits you whip up." We will not discuss what I wanted to say.....

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Arkansawyer wrote:

Joey Bloggs wrote:

I know without a reason of a doubt that if I have southuhners at my table and serve biscuits they will only eat them with their meal, not before, not on the side, with.   

Never heard of eating a biscuit alone before the meal, unless you're at Red Lobster. You eat breakfast biscuits with the breakfast.

Picture a scone.  a warm biscuit with jam and real butter melting in your mouth. That is how our non-southerners would eat them, vs with the meal, in one hand while eating off the plate with the other.  Hope that clarifies.  hard, dang it, to express in font at times.  

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Joey Bloggs wrote:

Hope that clarifies.  hard, dang it, to express in font at times.  

I was clear all along. I know how people outside the south do their strange things. Just don't know why anybody would do that to a perfectly good biscuit

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Joey Bloggs wrote:

Arkansawyer wrote:

Joey Bloggs wrote:

I know without a reason of a doubt that if I have southuhners at my table and serve biscuits they will only eat them with their meal, not before, not on the side, with.   

Never heard of eating a biscuit alone before the meal, unless you're at Red Lobster. You eat breakfast biscuits with the breakfast.

Picture a scone.  a warm biscuit with jam and real butter melting in your mouth. That is how our non-southerners would eat them, vs with the meal, in one hand while eating off the plate with the other.  Hope that clarifies.  hard, dang it, to express in font at times.  

Never really thought about this until you mentioned it, but you are right.  I know from personal experience!

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 I have only served sausage gravy and biscuits a few times. It is interesting how they eat them. I served them with the gravy in a nice bowl on the plate with biscuts on the side of the plate. One person just ate the gravy like soup, one broke up the biscuits and dipped them in the gravy, then one just broke them up and poured the gravy on top. She was from TN. It was interesting how different people do things. I would break them up and pour the gravy over. I would love to be served this. I don't order it ever in resturants because they only put maybe two little tiny pieces of sausage in the whole batch. To me that is not sausage and gravy. 

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 PS Just for props I won't touch Lipton tea either, never have never will. Just sharing that. Not all Americans enjoy Lipton, it is ...well I won't go there. Smiling

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Joey Bloggs wrote:

 PS Just for props I won't touch Lipton tea either, never have never will. Just sharing that. Not all Americans enjoy Lipton, it is ...well I won't go there. Smiling

You've spent a lot of time drinking 'proper' tea. Quite a lot of Americans have no idea there is something else out there besides Lipton or Salada.

 

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Me, either. 

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Brtis and Canadians- must have the British tea blend. Lipton (yuck) just won't cut it.

Marmalade for the same people.

Eggs and bacon for the midwesterners.

The coasts (both east and west) think that our baked oatmeal is divine and healthy...if they knew what was in it, they'd probably change their minds. But their ignorance is our bliss Smiling

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Europeans always start breakfast with cereal. Almost all of them. Some may go on to have the entree, some might not, but cereal it is. (Raisin Bran first, Frosted Flakes second, Shredded Wheat, Corn Flakes a distant fourth.)

Decaf coffee can't be brewed fast enough here when guests are from the MidWest. (2 pots yesterday)

No one from Pac NW will admit to liking or even tolerating Starbucks.

Euros hate our tea so we now carry British tea. Which they all seem to love and are much happier now.

There is not enough sugar in the world for anyone from the UK & Ireland.

Everyone has an opinion on the political nature of the US. No matter where they are from in the world they want to talk about it. The difference is in how they go about testing the waters to see if it's ok to talk about it. Italians jump right in. Canadians, too. UK tend to avoid the topic but will discuss if it's brought up. US citizens are right in the fray. Asians want to know our opinion, less likely to give their own.

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my guests from france asked for wine in the morning ... apparently they drink it throughout the day?  so they asked if they could bring some in themselves which was fine.  i don't know if this was just these people or a cultural thing. and tea.

they were accustomed to great bread.   i  picked up a beautiful crusty loaf which they devoured at the first breakfast.

they delighted in one fresh egg each from my egg man which they told me they didn't usually have.  and they also brought to the table a wedge of cheese one day. 

they ate 3 breakfasts with me, all the same.  they did not want waffles or pancakes or quiche, just bread.  the first day, they found a lovely little bakery in their travels and brought back all kinds of bread. baguettes and croissants and loaves. 

they did offer to share with others what they had.  it was quite interesting. 

 

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seashanty wrote:

my guests from france asked for wine in the morning ... apparently they drink it throughout the day?  so they asked if they could bring some in themselves which was fine.  i don't know if this was just these people or a cultural thing. and tea.

they were accustomed to great bread.   i  picked up a beautiful crusty loaf which they devoured at the first breakfast.

they delighted in one fresh egg each from my egg man which they told me they didn't usually have.  and they also brought to the table a wedge of cheese one day. 

they ate 3 breakfasts with me, all the same.  they did not want waffles or pancakes or quiche, just bread.  the first day, they found a lovely little bakery in their travels and brought back all kinds of bread. baguettes and croissants and loaves. 

they did offer to share with others what they had.  it was quite interesting. 

 

In Germany, breakfast was 1 egg, a hard roll whatever it was called it was HARD, cheese, and 1 piece of bacon. The buffet breakfast at the hotel in Paris had yogurt, hard rolls, cheese, fruit, and I think there was some kind of meat. There was also juice & coffee. Probably why I lost weight on that trip.

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 That's odd - I grew up in Europe and we never ate cereal for breakfast. Is that the Brits or also the Continent? In Switzerland and Germany I recall wonderful bread, butter, fruit and cheese for breakfast.

Riki

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egoodell wrote:

 That's odd - I grew up in Europe and we never ate cereal for breakfast. Is that the Brits or also the Continent? In Switzerland and Germany I recall wonderful bread, butter, fruit and cheese for breakfast.

Riki

UK, Germany, Italy, Spain, The Netherlands.

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in the more eastern european countrys they tend to have sliced meats and sliced cheeses with really fresh bread orange juice and cornflakes for breakfast. I like the french version hot buttered fresh crossants ripped into bits and dipped in hot chocolate - makes a right fricking mess mind.

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