WiFi problem

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07/06/2008

We have WiFi but many guests report that they can't connect. We have a cord they can plug into their laptop but not all laptops can accommodate it. Does anyone have experience with WiFi boosters that help with this problem?

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Madeleine's picture
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We came across this today and it seems to answer some very basic, easy for everyone questions. We did much of this ourselves by trial and error.

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Hillbilly's picture
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Our property consists of log cabins.  We have several other buildings around and we were having a very difficult time reaching everything.  When it comes to internet guests now days just expect it.  So I did a lot of research to find something that would work.  Most of the comments that I have read on her are talking about a Wal-Mart or Best Buy type equipment. I used the same junk.  This  is fine for residential use.  If you have 3 guests that are watching a movie from their Netflix account and you are trying to make or check reservations this is next to impossible.  Your system will freeze.  These wifi routers are not made for this type if use.  Yes, you will be replacing them often.  I found a company that has worked out wonders for our wifi needs. Its called Omni wifi.  They have equipment that will help with any of your wifi needs.  I bought the Park Camp spot system and it will project a wifi signal a mile (really).  It can also house up to a 100 users at a time. You  can also set it up for a billing purpose if you wish.  I did not do that.  You might want to check out their website and talk to one of them.  Just a thought!

http://www.omni-wifi.com/

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Madeleine's picture
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That's what we've been finding as well as we spent today trying to relocate the range expander so it would maintain the signal. (It is brand new, already having the same problems as the one that died 2 weeks ago.)

We're curious, tho, if our provider is curbing our signal because we have so many users on it. (Suggestion from an innmate as to what might be the problem.)

Do you have a dedicated commercial bandwidth?

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Bob wrote:

Most of the comments that I have read on her are talking about a Wal-Mart or Best Buy type equipment. I used the same junk. This is fine for residential use. If you have 3 guests that are watching a movie from their Netflix account and you are trying to make or check reservations this is next to impossible. Your system will freeze. These wifi routers are not made for this type if use.

Excellent points, Bob. I've been wondering what type equipment the hotels use that works so much better through multiple walls than what's available for home use. I'm sure the commercial grade stuff is more expensive, but probably worth it if it works well and lasts longer.

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Proud Texan's picture
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We're using a Linksys router, but I have connected via ethernet to a Ubiquiti Power Station.   It looks like a TV tray mounted on the side of the house, but I can broadcast a strong wi-fi signal all the way to our cottages 300 feet away.    It's line of site,  so I don't have to worry about anyone hacking into our network because we are set smack in the middle of the woods and 1/4 of mile away from ther main road.

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Proud Texan wrote:

We're using a Linksys router, but I have connected via ethernet to a Ubiquiti Power Station.   It looks like a TV tray mounted on the side of the house, but I can broadcast a strong wi-fi signal all the way to our cottages 300 feet away.    It's line of site,  so I don't have to worry about anyone hacking into our network because we are set smack in the middle of the woods and 1/4 of mile away from ther main road.

I do not know if you guys jinxed me or gave me insight to my problem yesterday. Suddenly I had no Internet. This morning still no Internet. Problem is there is no way to tell if it is provider or me. I am sent the right guests at the right time. Current guest checked what was happening with the system (I know better than to do that because I do not know what I am lookng at) and he took the modem straight thru the PC and I am back again. He said I should try reconnecting the Lynksis later because sometimes that fixes it (disconnect for a while). IF that does not work, any suggestions on what to replace the router with (brand or whatever - I think i just lost a 2-room because my WiFi is currently down.

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Some of the better DLink models have guest zones, so you can seperate that network with a different password and not on your network.

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Eric Arthur Blair wrote:

Some of the better DLink models have guest zones, so you can seperate that network with a different password and not on your network.

The modem is connected to the router and the guests have to login to the network with a password - I do not use a password. So, does that mean I have us separated? I ran computers - I did not tinker with their brains.

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gillumhouse wrote:

Eric Arthur Blair wrote:

Some of the better DLink models have guest zones, so you can seperate that network with a different password and not on your network.

The modem is connected to the router and the guests have to login to the network with a password - I do not use a password. So, does that mean I have us separated? I ran computers - I did not tinker with their brains.

Are you connected on wifi or on a wire?

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Eric Arthur Blair wrote:

gillumhouse wrote:

Eric Arthur Blair wrote:

Some of the better DLink models have guest zones, so you can seperate that network with a different password and not on your network.

The modem is connected to the router and the guests have to login to the network with a password - I do not use a password. So, does that mean I have us separated? I ran computers - I did not tinker with their brains.

Are you connected on wifi or on a wire?

I am wired! WIRED I say!!! OK, I am calm again - that felt good!

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gillumhouse wrote:

I am wired!

As Eric suspected, that explains it. If you remove the wire and log on to Wi-Fi, you'll be asked for a password too. Only the Wi-Fi is password protected, so neighbors can't "steal" it. Your wired connection doesn't require a password.

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 gillumhouse wrote:

He said I should try reconnecting the Lynksis later because sometimes that fixes it (disconnect for a while).

Not just disconnect the computer cable, but unplug the things from the wall. It's sort of like rebooting a computer.

Anytime my Internet is down, I unplug the modem and unplug Lynksis router, wait 20 seconds, power up the modem, wait another 20 seconds then power up the router. For me, that always fixes it unless it's a problem at the provider level.

gillumhouse's picture
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Thanks. I did that and reconnected. I am back online and the router is reconnected.

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 We had to replace one router recently, they aren't forever. But location IS KEY, moving it around and testing it is important, we find there are voids directly above a router (wherever we go, we can almost pinpoint it's location by that!)

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Theo's picture
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 Hola! 

this year, our first year by the way, we had some problems with Wifi too. Guests couldn't connect although the network was there. And most of the times it seem to happen when a lot of iphone's where around. Somehow our netgear router would drop the connection when it got confused with too many devices. I have read up on the subject online and it turns out that netgear routers tend to have that problem. So now i have changed the router to a completely different brand, i believe it TPlink, and everything works fine. 

Hope this helps, theo

www.otartufo.com

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Madeleine's picture
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We got a NetGear range expander and it has a feature to let you know when you've placed it in the best location for getting the most use out of it. ie- it doesn't like to be too close to the modem, so it will flash a yellow light until you move far enough away.

We've positioned it in a different location from where the old one was and have had good success so far. What we really need is a full house with everyone online at the same time to see if it 'breaks'. We had guests here when we did the swap and they watched a movie once the new expander was in place, no problems. The night before they couldn't even read their emails!

Our 'test guest' comes in a few weeks. Heavy user, he is here several times/month and lets us know if everything is not shipshape. Last time he ended up having to go to a coffeeshop to work. NOT GOOD.

A guest did mention that most home models fry within 12-18 months.

Arks's picture
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Theo wrote

I have read up on the subject online and it turns out that netgear routers tend to have that problem.

That's good to know. Buying equipment for multiple users like at a B&B is so different from buying just for a single home. I've had good luck with Linksys and bad luck with Netgear anyway, so your report helps confirm and guide me.

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 I was about to switch to a Linksys,when the guy who installed it for me offered to replace it (without cost) for a different brand. So far so good! I will let you know if it starts giving problems, but for now i am happy. 

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By a strange coincidence I was watching the Gadget Show one evening this week.

Might find this useful, if its available outside the UK.    fwd.channel5.com/gadget-show/videos/feature/internet-around-the-home

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Madeleine's picture
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If your building is large guests may not be able to connect from your main hub. You can get a range expander that will boost the signal.

We've found that many, many guests do not know how to use their computers. ESOC (Equipment Superior to Operator's Capabilities)

 

Joey Camb's picture
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04/02/2010

I have no idea what it is called but we bought a thing that looks like a smelly plug in. You have it in a pair one end plugs in near your router connected with a cable and has to be plugged directly into the wall. The other end goes whereever you like and it makes all your electrics into a wifi signal thing (you can tell im super technical) works great.

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Generic's picture
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I assume you are talking about powerline. Somehting like this? http://www.dlink.com/products/?pid=533

Joey Camb's picture
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yup its handy cos the other end part (does that make any sense?) doesn't need to be attached to its twin with any cables or anything so you can literally plug it in anywhere.

Generic's picture
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There are a number of repeaters around, but there are a few other things you can do to get better signal. And I do suggest a wireless bridge unless you really want to configure a router on router situation.

You can buy antennas on eBay that are shipped from Hong Kong for a few dollars if you have antennas that can be replaced. I used 16 db antennas. These also come with extensions, so you can put the antennas a bit further away. Signals are directional, so going at 45% isn't as good as 90% or 0% (think hypotenuse). And signals going downward are better than signals going upward. If you still have a problem, then get a wireless bridge (or a router with bridging mode) and put that in one of the rooms connected on the hardwire. If you are bridging they will authenticate off your router and get an IP address via bootp.

Arks's picture
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What I'd do is run one of those network cords to the most remote area of your building (away from the Wi-Fi router you have now) and plug the cable into a new Wi-Fi router there. Set it up as a new Wi-Fi source for that end of the building. So when a guest's equipment searches for a Wi-Fi connection they'll see both "My-Inn-1" and "My-Inn-2" and they can pick to log on to the one with the stronger signal.

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