Apple Bourbon French Toast

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http://tastykitchen.com/blog/2011/11/apple-bourbon-french-toast-casserole/ from Tasty Kitchen today. I'd likely skip the bourbon... not exactly the local stuff and I don't know how this would taste with rye instead. Do you serve anything flavoured with alcohol for breakfast?

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I forgot to say. If I am using any kind of booze in my dishes I always clear it with our guest first.  Even if I am cooking with it.

 

Highland Laddie (John)...Can you put a wee dent in your porriage?? .Then you could pour a  bit in the dent in the porriage.  I guess it would depend on how thick your porriage is?

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 I don't think I would try it with rye bread. Doesn't sound real appealing to me.

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catlady wrote:

 I don't think I would try it with rye bread. Doesn't sound real appealing to me.

  • Whisky from Scotland - Scotch Whisky
  • Whisky from Ireland - Irish Whisky
  • Whisky from USA - Bourbon Whisky (there are others, but this is the one that the US is famous for)
  • Whisky from Canada - Canadian Whisky, often called Rye Whisky

Oddly enough, you don't have to actually use rye to call it Rye Whisky in Canada, all Canadian Whisky can be legally called Rye Whisky. 

 

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Then there's the controversy over whether it's "whisky" or "whiskey". Generally, the wonderful elixir made in the British Isles is called whisky, with no "e". That made in the US is called whiskey with an "e".

By general agreement, Canadians are allowed to use what ever spelling they wish, as nobody knows how to categorize Europeans living on this side of the Atlantic Eye-wink

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Arkansawyer wrote:

Then there's the controversy over whether it's "whisky" or "whiskey". Generally, the wonderful elixir made in the British Isles is called whisky, with no "e". That made in the US is called whiskey with an "e".

By general agreement, Canadians are allowed to use what ever spelling they wish, as nobody knows how to categorize Europeans living on this side of the Atlantic Eye-wink

Official Canadian spellings are generally in the British fashion with a minor set in US fashion.

Canadian English uses tire and curb and not tyre and kerb. We keep the ou and we use re instead of er. We often use z instead of s, though both are accepted, and c over s in defence of the realm. And we can practise in practice if you want, since verbs are Ss while nouns are Cs. We still double "L"s, so we sometimes get traveller's cheques and not traveler's checks. Tidbit instead of titbit, for example. ae and oe are often retained. And you can use the t for past tense when appropriate, or so I learnt Smiling Not to mention the missing definite article when speaking of going to hospital, to university or school.

And I've included one Canadianism in a picture... just so everyone can have a chuckle at what we call "whole milk". And if that didn't give you enough of a chuckle, take a look at this link. We have milk in Canada that is microfiltered. It adds shelf life and makes milk taste richer. And this is how one dairy told people that it tasted richer.

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Eric Arthur Blair wrote:

Canadian English uses tire and curb and not tyre and kerb. We keep the ou and we use re instead of er. We often use z instead of s, though both are accepted, and c over s in defence of the realm. And we can practise in practice if you want, since verbs are Ss while nouns are Cs. We still double "L"s, so we sometimes get traveller's cheques and not traveler's checks....

Then there's the whole other national language to consider! I'm sure there are some differences between French and French-Canadian!

I'm just finishing reading a biography on Benjamin Franklin and his years in Paris negotiating with the French and British about ending the revolution. Franklin pushed hard to get Canada ceded to the USA, using the logic that keeping it would mean the British had to spend a fortune defending it from future American invasions. They say the British almost turned Canada over, but at the last minute that part of the agreement was dropped.

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Many many differences. They use so much English in France it's sometimes amazing. And so many expressions are difference. Quebec French accents are also very "flat" with much less emphasis or lilt. 

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 Ah Ben Franklin America's first postmaster general. Smiling  

That is on the US Citizenship Test.  What is one of the things Ben Franklin is known for, I said "The franklin stove" nope, not on the list, but that was.

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I bought some cheese slices for the girls lunches and it says, and I quote "WHITE AMERICAN cheese"  I have it in the fridge right now.

But Eric, I do recall the red caps on the gallon milk growing up that had the little sticker that read homo.

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Joey Bloggs wrote:

But Eric, I do recall the red caps on the gallon milk growing up that had the little sticker that read homo.

Yes, we had Homo milk here, too. Don't know if it's still that way, but it used to be. I was amazed that it made it to market. A big deal is made over some things, and other similar things just slip by with no problems. Ah, humanity.

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 Do you remember the different colours of standard milk? 

  • 0% (Skim) - Light blue
  • 1% - Purple
  • 2% (Low Fat) - Dark blue
  • 3.25% (Homo) - Red
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The Anglicized version is 'whiskey' in Ireland. The Gaelic is uisce beatha. Aptly, water of life.

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catlady wrote:

 I don't think I would try it with rye bread. Doesn't sound real appealing to me.

I think he means rye whiskey.

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Porridge is the thing that most people seem to think is missing from our breakfast menu, something I aim to correct this winter. It's difficult not to end up with either a gastly glutenous mass or a bowl of slop  when you're trying to prepare eggs, bacon, sausage, toms, haggis, ans mushrooms at the same time.

I do like a tot of whiskey in my porridge and I think guests would,  so I've been searching for something to serve it in. Something about the size of a thimble or slightly larger, not found anything yet.

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The only ingredients we ever use with alcohol content are extracts (essences). Take a look in the baking aisle and see what you can come up with that would approximate a brandy flavoring. Or, take it in a different direction and use a different flavoring. We used to make a FT that tasted like a Creamsicle (orange flavor on the outside, vanilla ice cream on the inside).

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Madeleine wrote:

The only ingredients we ever use with alcohol content are extracts (essences). Take a look in the baking aisle and see what you can come up with that would approximate a brandy flavoring. Or, take it in a different direction and use a different flavoring. We used to make a FT that tasted like a Creamsicle (orange flavor on the outside, vanilla ice cream on the inside).

I can always use rum extract Smiling Or dump all that and go maple Smiling

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As you've described, you also have those high taxes to consider in using alcohol in your cooking. Maybe you could just find a non-alcoholic flavoring that would give a bourbon or brandy flavor for less money.

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Yes I do! Try using orange brandy.   For that matter any brandy !

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..... I'll skip the french toast and apples Smiling

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