Small things that count

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10/07/2008

I just got a very nice thank you for your hospitality card with hand written comments from a person from out of town who attended that Civil War "afternoon tea" we hosted. He was the one man who was a bit of a character, and went raving on about the desserts, and how lovely everything was. I actually enjoyed having him here and got to joke around a bit with him (as the rest of the family were quite sour puss like).  

I was shocked to get it (as he did not co-ordinate the event at all) but he mentioned how well received the entire event was by his family. I am thankful for this small thing to brighten my day. He took the time to find the right card (we are not in the typical hallmark section of thank you cards, well maybe in Virginia we are!)

We forget how small things can make a big difference sometimes!

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Gluten free is never free. - Joey Bloggs

 

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06/24/2008

What also is interesting is that the man enjoyed the afternoon tea, not Atypical of a man.  So great that he took the time to write you a thank you. He enjoyed the hospitality.  Win them over ONE by one.    

Keep that card handy and use it to brighten up those days when you need a pick-me-up.

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10/07/2008

Thanks.  

Another part of this story is what DH calls "The Road Rally" where the older visitor in the wheelchair was off roading behind our house trying to find a way in, tearing up our path with the stepping stones. Everyone else was already here. Again, another thing to remember for "functions" I think the coordinator assumed she would not come, so it was quite a scene with me out back trying to assist the very large elderly woman in through MY KITCHEN.  You know it is off limits, and where is the bathroom? See what I mean.  And then get her road rally machine out of the dirt spin out it had made (yeah).  DH was outside working all day and was hesitant to lend a hand, why? Because he physically had to TOUCH this woman. Grab her arm or whatever, and hold her by the arms to assist.  See what I mean? He said "I couldn't touch her you had to deal with it" and it put him in an awkward place.  He is always first to lend a hand. But we are a business...

...and then there was the younger man who was sitting on the arm of the chair, sitting, it was not a sofa either. (Not trying to complain at all, just wanted to add to the "function" aspect that people think is a piece of cake to host.)   I enjoy catering and this sort of thing, I actually really do, but I don't like - you all already know this - the baby sitting portion.  

My help who work for free and myself were running ragged for this.  It is just not time and cost effective unless totally in the off season.  They were to be gone BEFORE 4pm, and right at 4pm my checkins arrived and they blocked the door and then stood in the foyer for another 15 minutes blocking in and our access to which I had to ask them to step outside on the porch.  ON PATROL. That's me.   Smiling

It's all good, just sharing these things. I hate that I have to clarify when I say stuff here, but people get the wrong idea and think it is all bad, it ain't.  And this sweet card made me feel real good. Someone noticed, someone enjoyed it all, that made it all worthwhile you see!

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05/30/2008

Well, you know my mantra - groups are not good.  Groups of any kind.  There is a different mentality that comes out in their actions.  No to the groups!

I think it's fantastic that you got that card...those are the things that can really make an innkeeper's day! 

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People don't notice whether it's winter or summer when they're happy.
~ Anton Chekhov

 

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10/07/2008

(more background for what it is worth - I am sharing as i knew NADA about the CV before moving here, or let's say I had many misconceptions from my schooling in the CALF school system).  

There is a photo in the paper of the event, they set off canons and had the reenactors there, so it was a big deal for their family.  Issuing the Iron Cross of Honor by the UDC. Asking about this I was told about these soldiers not being allowed in the V.A. and so they could not have the engraved stone cross, but were able through petition of the UDC receive this honor. So this was why they were all here, to bestoy this iron cross on the grave of their great grandfather.

           The Southern Cross of Honor is the name of two separate and distinct military honors presented to Confederate military personnel and veterans. The original wartime medal, aka Confederate Medal of Honor, was a military decoration meant to honor officers, noncommissioned officers, and privates for their valor in the armed forces of the Confederate States of America during theAmerican Civil War. It was formally approved by the Congress of the Confederate States on October 13, 1862,[1] and was originally intended to be on par with the Union Army's Medal of Honor.

During the war, however, there were shortages of metals, and many medals were not minted or awarded. The names of these soldiers were, however, recorded in an Honor Roll and preserved in the Adjutant Inspector General's records.

The postwar version of the medal, which is a separate award than the original wartime medal, came into being following a reunion in 1898. The idea of bestowing the Southern Cross of Honor to Confederate veterans of the American Civil War was conceived in Atlanta in July 1898 by Mrs. Alexander S. (Mary Ann Lamar Cobb) Erwin of Athens, GA, at a reunion of Confederate veterans. Mrs. Erwin and Mrs. Sarah E. Gabbett of Atlanta are credited with the design of the medal. The medal was at this point authorized by the UDC to be awarded to any Confederate Veteran who had provided "loyal, honorable service to the South and given in recognition of this devotion."[2]

The design for the face of the medal consists of a Maltese cross with a Confederate battle flag surrounded with a laurel wreath, with the inscription "The Southern Cross of Honor." On the back of the medal is the motto of the Confederate States of America, "Deo Vindice" ([With] God [As Our] Vindicator), and the dates 1861 1865. Post-War versions (starting in 1898) added the inscription, "From the UDC to the UCV." (UDC stands for the United Daughters of the Confederacy; UCV stands for the United Confederate Veterans.) The Southern Cross of Honor could only be bestowed through the United Daughters of the Confederacy. It could not be purchased; it was given in recognition of loyal, honorable service to the South and only a Confederate veteran could wear it. The first Cross ever bestowed was upon Mrs. Erwin’s husband, Captain Alexander S. Erwin, by the Athens (Ga.) Chapter on April 26, 1900.

The Southern Cross of Honor is also used as a symbol on the graves of Confederate Veterans who served honorably. It can take two different forms which can sometimes both be seen on the same soldier's grave.

One form is an outline of the Southern Cross engraved on the actual gravestone of the veteran.[3] This symbol is still available to be placed as an optional symbol of belief on a U.S. Veterans Administration issued gravestone.[4] This symbol will only be issued by the V.A. to be placed on the grave of a Confederate Veteran.[5] The symbol is also available to be placed on existing gravestones by some private monument companies and stone carvers.

The second form of the Southern Cross of Honor seen on Confederate graves is a two-sided, cast iron replica of the medal.[6] This cross stands atop a metal rod placed into the ground at the veteran's grave. It is sometimes referred to as the "Iron Cross of Honor" or "SCV Iron Cross." The cross is typically placed on Confederate graves by local chapters of the Sons of Confederate Veterans or by family members or interested parties related to the Confederate Veteran. The iron cross version of the SCH is available for purchase through several SCV chapters as well as several private foundries throughout the United States.[7] The grave of any Confederate Veteran who served honorably is eligible for placement of this symbol.

(Info from wiki again, not saying it is accurate in the least, but it was handy to cut n paste!)

gillumhouse's picture
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Joined:
05/22/2008

That was VERY interesting! Thank you.

gillumhouse's picture
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05/22/2008

It is the fact that it is  a small thing - meaning something that most would shrug off as unimportant - that makes it so special. Plus it is something that one does not associate as being done by a man - it is one of the things usually assigned to his "secretary", his wife.

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