Pancakes - I prefer them...

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Thin
18% (4 votes)
Thick
59% (13 votes)
Depends
18% (4 votes)
Other
5% (1 vote)
Total votes: 22

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And don't forget to warm up that syrup.  Yummy.....

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My sample size is small but I have found that if someone is not used to real maple syrup, it is not an instant like. They tend to wonder what is wrong with the syrup.

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toddburme wrote:

My sample size is small but I have found that if someone is not used to real maple syrup, it is not an instant like. They tend to wonder what is wrong with the syrup.

I agree, and they pour the whole bottle not realizing it is sweeter and thinner.

Do what you do. If you want to make a display of offering something local or regional and telling the guests I think that is great! Don't slide it out there unannounced (at the price it is!)  My 2 cents on real vs fake and diff grades.

If I have a couple in an old pickup truck here for an anniversary night with the address as a lot #, a special night away that someone else paid for, chances are they won't know what real maple syrup is, AND they won't enjoy or appreciate it.  Not trying to be crass, just honest. They would prefer the Missus Butterhead or whatever it is called. They expect their syrup thick.

As for warmed maple syrup, or syrup in general - ie blackberryor  blueberry whatever's your poison...I actually prefer mine cold. I don't like warm fruit nor syrup. I will literally pass on a warm cobbler (and I love fruit). I like the syrup cold when it hits the "hotcakes" but...that is just me. I warm it up every day I serve it here.  

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 Here is New England our guests KNOW real maple syrup from the fake stuff.  Some come to the table and can even tell what grade it is!  So no Aunt Jem or Mrs Butter here! 

Since the folks who frequent your inn don't know, I would try offering both and if they consistently prefer the fake stuff, save some $$$ by serving it and not wasting good syrup that is not appreciated.

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As warned, I discovered Pinterest. On it I saw this image and it said "Hey innkeeper do you want the embed code for your blog?" and I said, HECK YA! So here it is.  

Madeleine's picture
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Now to figure out if that is a workable way to serve pancakes! With syrup.

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I like making flower with my batter. Or lacy ones. A few regular ones then finish off with flowers made with the batter.

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there wasn't a box for made by someone else!! lol

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Generic's picture
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Next poll... what size? I only serve pancakes in what Americans call "silver dollar" size. And yes, I do them with nothing to measure them but my eye and a silver spoon.

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Madeleine's picture
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Eric Arthur Blair wrote:

Next poll... what size? I only serve pancakes in what Americans call "silver dollar" size. And yes, I do them with nothing to measure them but my eye and a silver spoon.

Our pancakes come out about 5-7" across, depending on how many are being made at a time. We use a small ladle.

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It depends....Buttermilk pancakes have to be thick but light.  And I agree that real NE maple syrup is a must.  But crepes must be thin.  And I make a cornmeal/rye pancake that has no egg and comes out "pancake flat" .  They look a little strange but once you taste the crunchy, buttery tidbit it's hard to stop!  So, thick or thin?  Who cares, just Pile 'em on, hot from the griddle!  

gillumhouse's picture
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It depends....Buttermilk pancakes have to be thick but light.  And I agree that real NE maple syrup is a must.  

I am partial to West Virginia maple syrup. It is awesome. NE is good........

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gillumhouse wrote:

West Virginia maple syrup...is awesome. NE is good........

I'm always looking for a "duck" emoticon to display when I'm ducking from something I've said, or in this case something Kathleen has said that is likely to get something thrown at somebody. If the New Englanders and Canadians don't have a reaction here, I'll be surprised!

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Generic's picture
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All maple syrup is the same if it is... real, at the proper concentration, at the proper grading level.

We tend to use No. 1 Medium for the guest and No. 1 Amber for cooking. We leave the No. 1 Clear for the tourists.

And as everyone around here knows... it comes in cans. Bottles... that's for the tourists as well.

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Does syrup taste and quality vary by maple production region?
Syrup flavor is affected by a variety of conditions, including tree genetics, soil type, weather conditions during the sugaring season, and processing techniques.

What is the best container to store maple products in?
Plastic containers are inexpensive, but do allow some gas exchange that causes decreases in syrup quality; syrup in plastic containers will degrade and change color about one grade after 3 to 6 months of storage. Glass, while more expensive, retains syrup quality longer.

What is the difference in maple syrup grades?
Most maple-producing states and provinces have their own laws regulating syrup sold in those states; Vermont requires a minimum sugar content of 66.9% sugar in its maple syrup, while New York requires a minimum of 66% sugar. States that don’t have specific regulations must follow the USDA guidelines. All states must use the USDA color standards to grade - or classify - the maple syrup, although states are free to use their own words to describe the colors. Canada uses slightly different color standards, which leads to slightly darker syrups in each color grade.

Canada

United States (USDA)

Vermont

No. 1 Extra Light

Grade A Light Amber

Fancy

No. 1 Light Grade A

Grade A Medium Amber

Medium Amber

No. 1 Medium Grade A

Grade A Dark Amber

Dark Amber

No. 2 Amber

Grade B for reprocessing

Grade B

No. 3 Dark

 

Commercial

 

 

 

http://library.uvm.edu/maple/faq/

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The official grading system (for both Canada and Quebec) can be seen at http://www.siropderable.ca/Afficher.aspx?page=149&langue=en and we use No. 1 Amber for cooking, since it's rich in flavour. In Quebec No. 2 is commercial use only and has at least one defect (flavour of caramel or sap, or traces of insoluble calcium malate.)

You can see the discussion on the use of cans at http://www.siropderable.ca/Afficher.aspx?page=60&langue=en basically in Quebec, we all get it in 540ml cans. Once open, you have to move it to another container, but we have syrup dispensers that basically fit an entire can.

Syrup in Quebec must be 66°Bx (Degrees Brix). Which means 66% sugar by weight, but it depends on temperature and refractive index and is too much for me to even begin to comprehend.

Tom
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(responding to the photo)

Does anyone have a syrup pitcher that doesn't drip and get sticky?  I have the kind with a metal top, handle on the side, and a thumb trigger to open for pouring.

Breakfast this morning: ultra sticky everywhere, and yeah, about 50 cents worth of real maple syrup (Quebec) left in a puddle on one plate.

 

 

gillumhouse's picture
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That would NEVER happen on MY plate!! Unless someone could see me, the phrase "lick your plate clean" would be applicable re maple syrup!

gillumhouse's picture
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As long as it is maple syrup it is good. Have used all 3 - just put the pancakes in front of me with a bottle of syrup!

I just meant that although everyone thinks good maple syrup only comes from NE (usually meaning Vermont) or Canada, WV has really awesome maple syrup. The largest WV syrup guy also markets water he sells under the name of Tree Water. He uses an osmosis process to remove the water from the sap before he starts cooking it down and that pur water is what he sells. Excellent water.

Madeleine's picture
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I really should have picked 'the way my mother makes them'!

I like them puffy but with crispy edges (lots of butter to cook them).

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Madeleine wrote:

I really should have picked 'the way my mother makes them'!

I like them puffy but with crispy edges (lots of butter to cook them).

I am with you, I would just eat the edges. I don't use any syrup, just buttery crispy edges...mm

Madeleine's picture
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No syrup for me, either, just hand over the powdered sugar.

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 I like the crispy edges...the lacy edges.  mmmm

gillumhouse's picture
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However they are served but with LOTS of syrup!!

Arks's picture
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That may be why I like them thick. They soak up more syrup (and have more flavor).

Strangely, the tastiet pancakes from a mix I've every had were from a "just add water" mix. And it makes it so easy to mix up just a little more batter if you run a little short.

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