New flooring

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I have just received approval for the first B&B in the town where I live. 

I believe it's a great site as I am located on a golfcourse have another across the road.

I'm looking to redo the flooring and am torn between new carpeting, laminate flooring or attempting to

restore the original plank flooring. 

The house itself is 250+ years, with many updates of course.  The sleeping quarters and common areas will be upstairs above me.

Any suggestions or insight would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks

Colleen848 

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Congrats and good luck on the renovations!

I have a 104 yr old house and our guests loved our old restored original floors.  Many, many guests had never seen anything like them.  I would say if the floors are in decent shape, show them off with area rugs! 

We ended up putting wood laminate in our kitchen and butler's pantry which was one of our last projects when we were renovating our house.  The floors were horrible and at that point we had spent so much money on the really BIG projects, that we could not afford replacing them with similar heart pine hardwood floors.  But, it was not the way that I really would have wanted to go even though they look great and I've been happy with them overall. 

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Unfortunately, due to the lack of funds I thinks I am just going to leave the existing carpeting down but remove it from the stairway going up.  Will have to wood putty in where the nailer strips are, paint and use stair treads to deaden the sound.

I don't know about other people but I'm in this on my own and just can't afford all the things I would like done at this point.

I am being optomistic in being able to, in the hope of getting repeat guests, by emailing them the updates and renovations.

Any thoughts?

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go for it! and definately get blogging white pine and arkensawyer are both in the pre opening loonbin renovation stage and have good and interesting blogs. You can also do facebook and twitter before you open as well. (Cos I am sure you don't have enough to do!) you might also think about doing a newsletter though don't over send it ie once every 2 or 3 months is enough and get your web site up it doesn't have to be how it will be eventually announce a work in progress and opening on XYZ this is what we are doing and this is how its going to be etc. Just to get some history on there and getting google to find it.

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gillumhouse's picture
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I have some noisy floors. My son sent me this Sunday.

http://video.pbs.org/video/2169247955

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Coputer just hickupped.

Appreciate the video link to this old house. I was unaware of the drill bit available to remove the inside piping of a PVC joint.  May have to pick up one of those.

Being a "tool freak" so to speak, I prefer Snap-on, Makita and Rigid tools although I don't see the need to buy the tool they showed to make a clean cut on the PVC. Be careful to cut straight and take a razor knife to clean off the excess.  Same as doing copper plumbing or running conduit.  Just ream it out and you are good to go.

Interesting about the screws that are designed to snap off.  I had never seen them before.  Will keep that in mind.

My problem is not the floor boards making noise but the inconsiderate people who stomp up and down stairs with what I call "elephant or thunder" feet.

Amazing some people are as quiet as a mouse and others you think fell down instead of walking.

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Amazing some people are as quiet as a mouse and others you think fell down instead of walking.

And notice how it is often the "skinny Minnie" walking like an elephant herd?

I knew your problem was not the squeeky or groaning floors but sine we were on the subject thought it may pertain to some others besides me. Glad the plumbing segment helped you.

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Colleen848 wrote:

I am being optomistic in being able to, in the hope of getting repeat guests, by emailing them the updates and renovations.

Any thoughts?

Guests love this stuff. Being as you are just starting out you can start a blog right now and talk about getting the permitting done and showing 'before' shots and after shots on the blog to drum up some interest. Also, if you haven't gotten your name picked out, do that AND get started on a website. It can take months for a new website to show up in searches. But, if you get the blog going, you'll have some history.

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Ice
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I have laminate and I HATE it.   Give me the real stuff!

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 We put in knotty pine flooring. I love it, but that may be because I grew up in Switzerland and they use a lot of it there in chalets and such so it could be just an emotional attachment!

One thing I have noticed is that lighter wood like ours does not show dirt or dust. Many tell me their lovely dark wood flooring shows dust even right after they are cleaned.

RIki

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All of the apts I either lived in or hung out in in NYC all had parquet flooring. If I bought a house with it I'd keep it but I wouldn't go out of my way to install it. But, absolutely love the floors in Parisian apts.

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What do you want, quality? Wood lasts, wood is lovely. Carpet stains, people have allergies to carpets and animal pee on carpet, oh and barf and other things.

Laminate, blech. 

TILE and WOOD. Top choices, a blend of both is nice.

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If you love the wood, and want to fix the room with the damage, try taking a piece of flooring to a local mill.

I had damage in what was the original indoor kitchen, now my den, and it was 100 y/o heart pine.  The mill matched it perfectly right down to the size and grain.  Worth the $.

My personal opinion is wood can be refinished, laminate can't. 

You can find the antique square nails online.  They are pricey now, more than the wood in my case, but I had tons at the time so saved my back side there.  Had I only known, could have put all three kids through college on the nails I didn't save. 

 

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Ha Ha.  I used to have some of those kicking around too but never realized they were so valuable.

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Colleen848 wrote:

Ha Ha.  I used to have some of those kicking around too but never realized they were so valuable.


 

$3 a nail now

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I appreciate all of your suggestions so much.  I was totally amazed at how quickly everyone responded.

Thank you for your insight, suggestions and support.

I am sure I will need much more advice as I continue this adventure.

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My neighbour has just done real wood laminate (oak i think) and it looks amazing however did point to her as it is in the hall which runs past her bedroom that she might think about a rug as otherwise the clop clop of shoes will keep her awake. My other neighbour has wood laminate in her breakfast room and swears by it and says would never have carpet in there again. However I would buy a more expensive real wood type as it will be more in keeping with your property and lasts longer. I really fancy having my breakfast room done like that but will have to win the lottery!

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I'm tending more towards the laminate with reservations about some of the problems I have addressed to others who commented.

The salesman told me that laminate wears better than real wood.

Anyone know if this is true or not?

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Colleen848 wrote:

I'm tending more towards the laminate with reservations about some of the problems I have addressed to others who commented.

The salesman told me that laminate wears better than real wood.

Anyone know if this is true or not?

Here's my experience...laminate doesn't show the wear the way that real wood does. Our dog beat our pine floors to death with her nails, running from her bed to the door. Couldn't see a thing with the laminate. Not a scratch or scuff. That said, we yanked the laminate out of the dining room and replaced it with real wood. Why? The laminate looks, feels and sounds like what it is- fake. Now I would bet good money that the laminate that was here was the cheapest thing on the market, so you might be able to find laminate that behaves better.

Laminate cannot be repaired the way real wood can. Think about your own house! The wood has been there for how many years??? And you can still walk on it, it still does the job. It might just need a little TLC. I think if I bought a house and found out there were real wood floors under laminate I would wonder about the sanity of the person who did that.

We have carpet in the bedrooms to deaden the sound. Keep sound transmission in mind whatever you do. If guests can hear each other, they will complain.

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Colleen848 wrote:
The salesman told me that laminate wears better than real wood.

Anyone know if this is true or not?

My real wood floors in a large part of the inn are from 1868.  It wears just fine if you take care of it, and can be refinished.  A professional can do the job with no left-behind rotary marks, although count on a lot of dust.

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 Congratulations!

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Thank you very much.  That was just the first hurdle.  Still need the certificate of occupany.

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I don't like carpet flooring at all. To me it just never feels clean. Smal rugs on a wood or laminate floor are preferable. Laminite is easy and you can put good insulation below it. The original wood is also great. Be aware that laminate shouldn't go near water, but if damaged is relatively easy to replace.

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I was told by a salesman today that they have laminate flooring that is guaranteed water resistant.  Since there will be no running water in the rooms I am not that concerned.

Unfortunately I am not able to provide separate baths.  They will share a huge bathroom with an original claw foot tub that I had re-glazed.  You know the kind you could drown in. lol

After pondering what you said I feel you have an excellent point in that carpeting just doesn't feel as clean.  It is subject to spills, stains and absorbs odors.

Thanks for the reply

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Living in a 100+ year old farm house, I have refinished the original wood floors in 7 of the 9 rooms.  The dining room was too far gone, and the kitchen although had "wood" it was not suitable for finishing, it got tile.

I used the water based poly as well and it is awesome.  Teenagers, and a big stupid dog haven't even left a scratch.  I agree carpet (ours was pepto pink in the living room) is very out of character.  Not only is wood historically correct it is much easier to keep clean.

The best thing about wood floors is you can clean them silently, no vacuum buzzing about.  A good dust mop or damp mop (ala Swiffer) and the dust bunnies are toast!

Large area rugs can easily be aired out for deep spring cleaning or shampooing.  Wood is always the way to go.

 

 

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Here's a test...stand downstairs and have some friends walk around upstairs. Have them talk on their phones and maybe turn on a radio or two.

How much sound are you getting downstairs and in the hallways and room to room?

If you can insulate between the floors and walls, keep as much original woodwork as you can. If you can't insulate and it sounds like a herd of buffalo with just a couple of friends doing a test, then you need carpeting to deaden the sound. Maybe a really nice, large area rug with some good padding underneath would give you the best of both.

Good luck with your big project!

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Thanks for your advice.  Actually the area I will be using I had previouly rented out as a 2 bedroom apartment.  So I am pretty much aware of the noise level.

With the exception of a teenage girl blasting music I didn't have much sound downstairs.

Other than that, the most noise comes from small children running through the rooms or those "elephant" feet people who stomp up the stairs. 

Problem lies in the stairway going upstairs in that it lands on an L shaped hallway with one wall that is curved in an arc.  Amazing what they did with horse hair plaster and lath.

I like the simplicity of laminate but a place I called said it was quite costly to put a "nose" on each step.

Guess I will just have to get quotes.

Thanks for your insight and quick reply.

 

Tom
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Carpet on stairs is a good thing though: less slippery, way cheaper, and deadens sound a lot.  Can be a runner style wrapped over the nose, or full width.  Plan to replace it frequently.

As for sound, laminate is noisy, with high frequency, knocking sound from footsteps radiating up into the room, not just down.  There are sound deadening underlayments that help, but cheap laminate is noisy.

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Tom wrote:

Carpet on stairs is a good thing though: less slippery, way cheaper, and deadens sound a lot.  Can be a runner style wrapped over the nose, or full width.  Plan to replace it frequently.

As for sound, laminate is noisy, with high frequency, knocking sound from footsteps radiating up into the room, not just down.  There are sound deadening underlayments that help, but cheap laminate is noisy.

On this I disagree. I look at carpet on stairs as an opportunity to catch a heel or slip on the edge and do a header. As a KLUTZ in capital letters, I have done both. I recently got rug stair treads and I DO like them. They do deaden the noise and make it less likely to slip - they do not have the nap a carpet does. I have a low nap runner in the hall. My house is a youngster - it is only 100 years old.

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The engineering firm that made the blueprints so I could submit the proposal to the town planning board suggested removing the carpeting on the steps. Probably for the reasons you stated.

I like the carpet treads you have.  My question is how are they secured.  And, do you actually notice a definite lowering of the noise level if you have someone who has a case of "thunder" feet?

On the first floor where I am, the lower area under the stairway goes to my basement.  I suppose I could insulate that well to try and cut down noise.

 

 

 

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I tacked them down with carpet tacks. They have a rubber backing but I did not trust that. I think i used 6 tacks - 4 corners and 2 centers. Those suckers are not going anywhere easily.

It DOES cut down on the noise of going up and down the stairs. The drawback is that I can no longer hear guests coming down to breakfast as I did before but will give that up for less noise of late arrivals.

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The treads are way better than a runner.  Had a runner and it was always moving around, clean wood can be very slippery, I have treads on both sets of stairs, and use a handi-wipe dampened with Murphy's to clean the corners and a dust buster to suck up any loose stuff on the carpet portion.  Saves wear and tear on the treads too!  I too have a baby house, just turned 102 this year.

 

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Weaver wrote:

The treads are way better than a runner.  Had a runner and it was always moving around, clean wood can be very slippery, I have treads on both sets of stairs, and use a handi-wipe dampened with Murphy's to clean the corners and a dust buster to suck up any loose stuff on the carpet portion.  Saves wear and tear on the treads too!  I too have a baby house, just turned 102 this year.

 

Oh yeah I hear ya! My runner is not moving around (carpeted stairs) UNLESS someone catches a heel or something, then it has a lifted edge or seam!  BTW Listen everyone anyone wearing stileto heels in your B&B is going to make a racket, it is what it is. People who do that here, coming around the porch just make the veins behind my eyes bulge!  They do not care about anyone else, and they will wear those (or high heeled boots) each and every time they come in and up the stairs. Go figure!

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Yeah, I wore 3 inch heels until I was about 4 months preggers and the doc said no. After he finally got out and walked, my feet protested so much I went to lower heels and flats. Not soon enough for my poor feet though. Fortunately very few of my guests come with the stiletos. They leave the most enduring evidence in the wood (especially when they are carrying tonnage - I can attest to it).

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Congrats!!

Are the originall floors unusable? Could you just sand and seal them?

We (ahem, DH) sanded the floors with a hand sander so he would not have swirls on the floor from the sander. Then we used a water-base ploy that in made in New Berlin, Wisconsin,. Expensive, but worth it. He did 4 or 5 coats on the dining room floor in 1995 - high traffic room - and it is still nice, The thing about the water-based poly is that it does NOT darken the wood as the oil-based does. It let the beauty of the wood show. He did this in all the guest rooms also. Have area rugs in all the rooms with the beautiful showing all around.

Oersonally, if I had a house that was 250+, I would not have carpet - out of place, out of period.

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I honestly can't remember what the plank flooring looks like since the wall to wall has been down so long.  Believe me I got my monies worth.

One of the bedrooms I know I would not be able to restore because I cut through the floor to reinforce a box to install a downstairs ceiling fan.

I had an experience with my ex of sanding a floor before and would NEVER want to do that again.

Guess I'll have to pull the carpeting up and take a look see.

I agree that wood would be more in period with the house. 

You reminded me that when an appraiser came through and saw the flooring in my quarters noticed that there were 3 different widths to the boards, excluding the planking.  He could date it back to when it was installed by that.

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One of the bedrooms I know I would not be able to restore because I cut through the floor to reinforce a box to install a downstairs ceiling fan.

Our electrician had to cut through the hallway floor when removing our knob & tube wiring per the demands of the insurance company. You cannot tell where it was done. If patched properly, it will be OK.

Your statement of the shared bath is the one that made me sit up and take notice. Take it from one who knows from experience - figure out HOW to put in at least one private bathroom. I still have 2 that share a bathroom but created another bahtroom buy giving up half of my storage (the 4th bedroom upstairs) room so I have one with pvt bath. That raised my revenues by 33%. Would have done it sooner if DH had been willing to sign for a loan - it took 10 years for HIM to see the need. Fireplaces, plumbing location, and closets that are too small for anything keep me from doing another bathroom (in addition to dollars).

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I realize a private bath would be nice however the constraints of the building prohibit it.  I could possibly squeeze a very small half bath into one of the rooms but then there would not be a closet.

Since I only have 2 rooms to rent I hope it won't be too much of a problem.

Originally I was going to have 3 rooms but decided against it since the other room has a fireplace and goes out onto a 18x20 foot covered porch.

I decided to make that a common area so that smoker's would be able to go outdoors without having to go downstairs plus they would still have a roof over their head.

It would also be nice for coffee in the morning or a glass of wine from one of the local wineries.

Too bad though, because I would have possibly been able put in 2 half baths as there is a long hallway (which is now used as a closet) between the 2 rooms.

That closet (hallway is too deep for a half bath and since the one bedroom doesn't extend the full length of it, it will not work.

Maybe if this flies I can expand into my downstairs and I will move into my back apartment.

 

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I realize a private bath would be nice however the constraints of the building prohibit it.  I could possibly squeeze a very small half bath into one of the rooms but then there would not be a closet.

Since I only have 2 rooms to rent I hope it won't be too much of a problem.

Originally I was going to have 3 rooms but decided against it since the other room has a fireplace and goes out onto a 18x20 foot covered porch.

I decided to make that a common area so that smoker's would be able to go outdoors without having to go downstairs plus they would still have a roof over their head.

It would also be nice for coffee in the morning or a glass of wine from one of the local wineries.

Too bad though, because I would have possibly been able put in 2 half baths as there is a long hallway (which is now used as a closet) between the 2 rooms.

That closet (hallway is too deep for a half bath and since the one bedroom doesn't extend the full length of it, it will not work.

Maybe if this flies I can expand into my downstairs and I will move into my back apartment.

 

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Welcome! Congratulations. Is it your current home or were you a lucky one able to get financing for a  B& B?

Personally I would go for hardwoods and use area rugs. Easier to take care of and you don't have to worry about cleaning stains and spills from carpeting.

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I am most definitely leaning towards laminate flooring with a visual, imagination block about how to handle the stairs and hallway as I mentioned in other comments.

No, I am not a lucky one that was able to purchase a property for this purpose.

Actually my children who are now all in their 20's are fourth generation here.  So there is alot of history.

My grandfather originally purchased this home with the surrounding 150+ acres to farm.  After he retired my father put in an airport and then later built the golfcourse I am surrounded by.  They are all long deceased.

He had a sad tale that at the age of 70 my stepmother filed for divorce and he was forced to sell.  He sectioned off this homestead which I have today.

Long story but that's how it goes.

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