Friends and Family - Not the Government - Inspire Brits' Holiday Choices in 2012

28 replies [Last post]
Offline
Joined:
10/07/2008

 Friends and Family - Not the Government - Inspire Brits' Holiday Choices in 2012

Nice little survey with info

 

The ABTA YouGov survey also revealed that British holidaymakers are more likely to look forward to a foreign break (42%) than a domestic one (16%) reinforcing Britain’s desire to ‘get away from it all’. 41% of respondents look forward to both types of holiday equally. 

__________________

Gluten free is never free. - Joey Bloggs

 

Offline
Joined:
10/07/2008

Here is an older report (and I believe it has taken off much more since 2001) but useful graphs and charts (might be much of the same info you shared):

http://www.fs.fed.us/outdoors/naturewatch/start/economics/Economic-Analysis-for-Birding.pdf



 

Unlike hunting and fishing where men were overwhelmingly in the majority, a slightly larger percent of birders were women — 54 percent in 2001. And most birders, 72 percent, were married.

Bird watching by state residents tells only part of the story. Many people travel out-of-state to watch birds and some states are natural birding destinations. Wyoming reaped the benefits of this tourism with a whopping 67 percent of their total birders coming from other states. The scenic northern states of New Hampshire, Vermont, Montana, and Alaska also attracted many birders — all had more than 40 percent of their total birders coming from other states.

By the way do you know "there's an app for that" yes you can take a photo of a bird or a wildflower and send it up to cyberspace and have it identified right then. Now the reason I find this so cool is #1 they are able to get a better mapping of these for the database (like backyard bird count which we recently had - Christmas Bird count).  The technology is amazing. so add that to the list of purchases, besides field guides.  Smiling

 

Madeleine's picture
Offline
Joined:
09/29/2011

Last year, when we had a completely off course bird here from Asia, birders flocked here in droves from all over. Not here in particular, but 25 miles away (15 as the crow flies). So, birders will travel at the drop of a hat to see something unusual that they probably will never go to see in its natural habitat. Doesn't mean they're going to stay over, tho.

__________________

Everyday, for good or ill, we intersect with some else's story and become a part of it.

 

Arks's picture
Offline
Joined:
05/22/2010

Joey Bloggs wrote:

Interesting discussion. This is an area I would like to tap into a bit more.

Absolutely, and it really doesn't matter so much if one group or the other spends more. We want to attract them all. Of course, it would be nice to give more emphasis to the ones who spend the most.

Joey Bloggs wrote:

By the way do you know "there's an app for that" yes you can take a photo of a bird or a wildflower and send it up to cyberspace and have it... 

I have an app on my iPhone called Leafsnap. It takes a photo of a leaf, goes on line, and tells you the tree or shrub it came from. I didn't know they had one for birds too. That's good, if you can get close enough to get a good photo!

__________________

All saints can do miracles, but few of them can keep hotel. ~ Mark Twain

 

Joey Camb's picture
Offline
Joined:
04/02/2010

I would say 75% of leisure bookings are booked by women (no offence guys but we just don't trust you!) even when the room is booked in a man's name the email address is mary.smith@hotmail.com so you know its the wife. If you get them on the phone its the woman who makes the enquiry gets all the details and then hands over to the man (if he is involved at all) to give his card details!.

__________________

Don't mess with me today or I will kill you!!!!

 

Arks's picture
Offline
Joined:
05/22/2010

I was interested to see it say that women do most of the deciding on vacations (where to go, where to stay). I suspected that but good to see it confirmed. It helps to know who the target of your marketing should be.

gillumhouse's picture
Offline
Joined:
05/22/2008

DH says flat out that the reason we had so many interesting trips was the research and planning that I did. He maintains I should have had a travel agency.

Offline
Joined:
10/07/2008

Arkansawyer wrote:

I was interested to see it say that women do most of the deciding on vacations (where to go, where to stay). I suspected that but good to see it confirmed. It helps to know who the target of your marketing should be.

Yeah baby!

I believe most of us know this deep down. Even if the rez comes in via a male name, if they are a married couple, it is overwhelmingly females who choose to stay in B&B's. They are also the one who pick the campground and park for a family summer vacation.

Unless it is a male owner and operated B&B, of course. Then those stats are out the window, but in the grand scheme of things, the females choose them, the mothers and the wives are typically the planners.  Now I would never say that in my marketing, of course, but would try to appeal to them a bit more. But - not a girl friend getaway - spa, pink and frilly. That is insulting!  I think that appeals to a very small population of females.

Let's see "DUCK BLIND or ROMANTIC BED AND BREAKFAST?"  (I say duck blind since your state is a premiere duck hunting locale)  Smiling

Arks's picture
Offline
Joined:
05/22/2010

Joey Bloggs wrote:

Let's see "DUCK BLIND or ROMANTIC BED AND BREAKFAST?"  (I say duck blind since your state is a premiere duck hunting locale)  Smiling

Yes, we're right on the edge of a huge federal wildlife area known locally as "the duck woods" and lots of duck hunters travel to here. My friends at the local Days Inn say they have trouble with some of the hunters wanting to clean their ducks inside their room! So they watch for them and direct them out back where they keep a table and water hose just for the duck hunters.

They also encourage them to hose off their boots before entering the hotel.

As you might imagine, I'm a bit worried about this, but I'd be foolish not to market to the duckhunters. They're here in the cold months when nobody else is!

Offline
Joined:
10/07/2008

Arkansawyer wrote:

Joey Bloggs wrote:

Let's see "DUCK BLIND or ROMANTIC BED AND BREAKFAST?"  (I say duck blind since your state is a premiere duck hunting locale)  Smiling

Yes, we're right on the edge of a huge federal wildlife area known locally as "the duck woods" and lots of duck hunters travel to here. My friends at the local Days Inn say they have trouble with some of the hunters wanting to clean their ducks inside their room! So they watch for them and direct them out back where they keep a table and water hose just for the duck hunters.

They also encourage them to hose off their boots before entering the hotel.

As you might imagine, I'm a bit worried about this, but I'd be foolish not to market to the duckhunters. They're here in the cold months when nobody else is!

May I offer this advice: For those who have a spouse or partner who wants to sit out in the cold water or rice paddy duckhunting, they bring their wives along. Or they could, if there was an incentive. Having known one of these wives personally from many states away, they opted for antique shopping and dining out while the husband was with the hunting guide. It was a win win. They didn't clean dead ducks back at their hotel, they did this with the guide and he even froze the meat for them and they drove it back on dry ice.

If you have any guides there they would be a great contact to give rack cards and get your url on their website. You have probably thought of all this, just my suggestion from the outside looking in. 

Arks's picture
Offline
Joined:
05/22/2010

Joey Bloggs wrote:

May I offer this advice: For those who have a spouse or partner who wants to sit out in the cold water or rice paddy duckhunting, they bring their wives along. Or they could, if there was an incentive.

They have incentive. They bring the women folk along to pluck feathers while they sit back and sip beer.

I don't think most use a guide, which is why the rescue squad gets called out often to hunt for lost men in the duck woods.

No, Sof far I hadn't given much thought to the duck hunters, and your suggestions are good, and timely. Thanks.

Offline
Joined:
10/07/2008

Arkansawyer wrote:

Joey Bloggs wrote:

May I offer this advice: For those who have a spouse or partner who wants to sit out in the cold water or rice paddy duckhunting, they bring their wives along. Or they could, if there was an incentive.

They have incentive. They bring the women folk along to pluck feathers while they sit back and sip beer.

I don't think most use a guide, which is why the rescue squad gets called out often to hunt for lost men in the duck woods.

No, Sof far I hadn't given much thought to the duck hunters, and your suggestions are good, and timely. Thanks.

Awrighty. I just know the amount of money some of them spend on their hobbies, and they often offset this to please the little lady while they spend big bucks. Yeah I don't know about your area specifically, but there are tons of forums that hunters rely on these days...Out of state hunters almost always use a guide, once you find the good guide, it is word of mouth and outdoor shows, etc.  Local hunters are not what you are after, as always, local is never what we want.

I have no idea if any of these are near you: http://www.greenhead.net/guide-services

Arks's picture
Offline
Joined:
05/22/2010

I'm also wanting to market to bird watchers. I hear they spend more than any other tourists, and we're right in the middle of North America's main yearly bird migration route.

Barely on subject: I vacationed a few years ago in Ecuador, at this rain forest lodge over the Andes from most of the country, along a tributary to the Amazon, and leaned that there are more different types of birds in the little country of Ecuador than in all of North America.

I'm no bird watcher, but there was a British bird watcher chap there who paid a local porter just to carry his bird watching telescope on all the hikes. I like big spenders like that. Don't see many of those here in Arkansas!

Madeleine's picture
Offline
Joined:
09/29/2011

Marketing to birders- early breakfasts are a must (like before sunrise, which is 4:30 AM here) or a packed breakfast to go. Get in with a local birding group that does tours. Follow the birders on their blogs to know what birds can be expected and when.

Offline
Joined:
10/07/2008

Arkansawyer wrote:

I'm also wanting to market to bird watchers. I hear they spend more than any other tourists, and we're right in the middle of North America's main yearly bird migration route.

Barely on subject: I vacationed a few years ago in Ecuador, at this rain forest lodge over the Andes from most of the country, along a tributary to the Amazon, and leaned that there are more different types of birds in the little country of Ecuador than in all of North America.

I'm no bird watcher, but there was a British bird watcher chap there who paid a local porter just to carry his bird watching telescope on all the hikes. I like big spenders like that. Don't see many of those here in Arkansas!

I like your optimism!

Care to share where the bird watchers spend more $ came from, I would like to know. Those that I know are quite possibly the thriftiest people on the planet. I would really like the info if you can recall it, as we have birding and wildlife trails here - we have another major flyway, The Atlantic Flyway on our coast. It is on my list to get over there and see it!  (not in mosquito season though) 

There is an innkeeper on this forum who has a personalized birding map made up by a birder and photographer for their inn. I think that is totally neat!

Arks's picture
Offline
Joined:
05/22/2010

Joey Bloggs wrote:

Care to share where the bird watchers spend more $ came from, I would like to know. Those that I know are quite possibly the thriftiest people on the planet.!

Ah, so the Arkansas bird watchers are going to Virginia.

I just know that it's kind of common knowledge that bird watchers are big tourism spenders, perhaps because they, like theatre and opera lovers, are more likely to be from the "monied classes", and spend more on wine and comforts, compared to folks who watch birds with a shotgun in hand.

Here are some quotes I found in articles:

Article: Socio-economic impacts of bird watching along Great Lakes

Quote:

"Birders spend more money than other visitors to natural sites."

"For example, birdwatchers spend money on lodging, food, and other goods and services, thereby providing employment for local and non-local residents."

Article: Tracking Expenditures of the Elusive Nature Tourists of Southeastern Arizona

This study of nature tourists in Arizona indicates that bird-watchers spend more money than other visitors to natural sites.

Granted, it makes me suspicious that both articles use almost exactly the same language, making me think they're both quoting the same source, but our tourism association has heard this for years, that birders are big spendrers.

Offline
Joined:
10/07/2008

Thanks for the articles. Ecotourism. Yes I agree they do travel to bird watch, so they are spending money. No doubt about it. But I don't see them spending more than they have to, like tourisn visitors would.

I ask this as our state parks have a huge economic impact on the local communities and these are people staying in tents. Not exactly what I personally think is huge, but it is in the grand scheme of things, esp by sheer numbers it has a huge impact, and creating jobs.

I think we need to discuss the hunters vs the bird watchers thing. I am not talking about local hunters, heck here they hunt to feed their families, I am also not talking about the stereotypes. I know quite a few who travel out of state, and country as I mentioned, and spend a ton of money on their sport.  A TON of money. Yes that even includes geese in Arkansas.

I do have figures from a wildlife source on spending for equipment, cameras, etc for birders. They do spend $ before they go as well. 

Back to reality for me - we have Bassmasters tournaments at our lake, this is televised and big money sport (as you can tell by all the sponsors on their jerseys). They say how much these bass masters spend and put into the local economy and I am still doubting it. They arrive in hundred thousand dollar vehicles, towing hundred thousand dollar boats, and they pre-fish, they fish, they win and they go. They don't seem to be spending much locally. On the other hand, they bring the lake to public view, so that is good advertising.  But none have ever stayed with us. Even with our marketing directly to them via Bassmasters themselves asking us to! Even mentioning private off street parking for safety of vehicles and equipment.  They have to stay near their boats.

Interesting discussion. This is an area I would like to tap into a bit more.

 

Madeleine's picture
Offline
Joined:
09/29/2011

I have to agree that these types of 'sport' visitors have already spent the money before they arrive. Once they get here, unless something breaks, they don't spend more than anyone else. It's finding a way to get them to come in the first place. But, your experience is that they don't 'stay local'. My guess is it runs a lot like any convention...they all want to be together in one location, even if that's a el stinko motel.

We have that here with the quilting expo. And here is our perfect target market...women! But, no, they end up wanting to congregate in one location so they book entire hotels (multiple, yes) and avoid the small places that are right next door!

We did have guests who bought equip and had it shipped to us, but again, bought it online before they arrived and had it shipped. Did not buy it here.

 

Offline
Joined:
10/07/2008

Madeleine wrote:

I have to agree that these types of 'sport' visitors have already spent the money before they arrive. Once they get here, unless something breaks, they don't spend more than anyone else. It's finding a way to get them to come in the first place. But, your experience is that they don't 'stay local'. My guess is it runs a lot like any convention...they all want to be together in one location, even if that's a el stinko motel.

We have that here with the quilting expo. And here is our perfect target market...women! But, no, they end up wanting to congregate in one location so they book entire hotels (multiple, yes) and avoid the small places that are right next door!

We did have guests who bought equip and had it shipped to us, but again, bought it online before they arrived and had it shipped. Did not buy it here.

 

Having helped with blog articles for birding events, it is a "Flock together" thing, I agree.  In fact they rent a large portion of a hotel and have a shuttle for everyone, a kayak tour to get up close, packed lunches etc. Special guides (people) in the field - like the dude on Jefferson's River (Rivanna) who was a well known birder from Africa to Australia - he was at the back of the canoes and we never heard a word from him.  

It is really a fun thing, not as much a B&B thing, but that doesn't mean they won't choose a B&B...some might. We have had a couple birders here. It was a fluke tho. I blogged some birding trails nearby in the past, and it is on our sites of interestpage, I blogged it again.

Madeleine's picture
Offline
Joined:
09/29/2011

We don't get a lot of folks here just for the birds even tho we, too, are on a migratory route (raptors). However, the one we got here specifically for birding spent a fortune on the birding part of the vacation. Flew here from the West Coast to see a specific bird (A, as in ONE), paid a guide for a private overnight tour, dumped his wife in our least expensive room while he took off for 2 days for the mountains. Not sure how he treated the guide, but he treated the rest of us, including his wife, like dirt.

One example. Not at all indicative of the flock. Probably more like an invasive.

 

 

Madeleine's picture
Offline
Joined:
09/29/2011

Absolutely agree that the reservations coming in under a guy's name are mostly made by women. Why? The email goes to the woman! Addressed to the man because that's how the software does it. Unless it's his way of saying, 'See, I did it.'

Madeleine's picture
Offline
Joined:
09/29/2011

I never include spa stuff in GF getaway weekends because it is too dang hard to plan. What's big here for GFGA:

  • wine tastings
  • chocolate tastings
  • archery, skeet & fishing demos
  • shopping
  • theater
  • hanging out together
Offline
Joined:
10/07/2008

Madeleine wrote:

I never include spa stuff in GF getaway weekends because it is too dang hard to plan. What's big here for GFGA:

  • wine tastings
  • chocolate tastings
  • archery, skeet & fishing demos
  • shopping
  • theater
  • hanging out together

a package. Not the bulk of your guests, that would be a small %. But speaking of the overall flavor of your website, does it appeal to females more than males...I think that is what I was getting at, not specifically geared packages.  

For example, we can mention the old historic home B&B's with pink gingerbread and all the dried flowers and decorators touches, the frilly canopy beds, the intense wallpaper all over the inn, the way over the top breakfasts (settings and servings).  Not that is anything wrong with that, just saying these website and experiences appeal to certain people, primarily women of a certain style.

Don't get me wrong when I share these images...there is a place for each of us, this inn has a wonderful niche market.

Madeleine's picture
Offline
Joined:
09/29/2011

I don't do GFGA pkgs. Just saying that when GF's come here that's what they do. Rarely do they go do the spa thing unless they planned it themselves in advance.

(Sorry, I do see where my first comment implied I plan the weekends. I meant if someone calls to reserve for a group of women, I let them know about the things I mentioned and where they can find them.)

Madeleine's picture
Offline
Joined:
09/29/2011

 I do have to say that the statement that planning a holiday is one of the few pleasures left to the British working population is kind of sad. Really? There is nothing else in their lives but getting away from their lives?

Offline
Joined:
10/07/2008

Madeleine wrote:

 I do have to say that the statement that planning a holiday is one of the few pleasures left to the British working population is kind of sad. Really? There is nothing else in their lives but getting away from their lives?

Well they certainly are not staying in the UK for the weather!

I would be interested in seeing this same poll for the USA. UK are more intl travel minded, I mean living on an island does that to you (plus they have more annual days for holidays than the USA by far).   There are segments of our country where I think the inns have a totally diff travel base, say the midwest, vs the NE.  The East coasters seem to zip up and down this coast all the time, no worries.

Madeleine's picture
Offline
Joined:
09/29/2011

I think Hawaiians feel similarly about getting off the Islands.

It would be interesting to do our own poll...not sure how to lay it out.

Where is your inn located (either by state or area of the country- but, we can't even decide on which states go in which areas of the country, so we'd have to lay the groundrules first!) and where do your guests typically come from? Say the top 50%. Nearby states? Within 200 miles? 500 miles? (OK, so I just gave away that I live in a state where you can travel 500 miles and actually BE in another state. )

 

gillumhouse's picture
Offline
Joined:
05/22/2008

RE: USA Poll

I also live within driving distance of half the population. I rarely get furriners. The man from England who came here specifically was writing a book about towns on US Rte 50 and the lady from England came here because she was driving US Rte 50 to a Conference (she used the Conference as an excuse to extend before & after for holiday and took a different route each time). My Netherlands family and the Aussies came via the Welcome Center as they were coming down the Interstate.

However, I do get a lot of guests from Florida, Illinois, and Cali, but the bulk are from the Beltway and surrounding States. I also get a nice number from in-State.

Offline
Joined:
10/07/2008

Re USA POLL

The diff in the answers also being that half of the US Population is within a days drive from us here. So how does that skew the poll? Probably severely. 

Example PT's cabins, he is a destination (and destination guests typically go to just that one place and stay) vs our inn, for example, which is between 50 major "tourism" destinations, so we get more road trippers.  We DO get the UK guests as they go from one famous tourism site to another- it may be a natural site like The Shenandoah National Park or The Great Smokies. Also wanting to see small town USA and southern living. We do NOT get the UK visitors going to our lakes, kayaking, hiking, or any of that! They do not stay in cabins, they are not interested in hot tubs, in the least, when they drive the road, or blue highways, the may enjoy off the beaten path, but that is rarely on their agenda. 

So that is a part of that poll that needs to be spoken. Going to a place via word of mouth, but it must be grand, it cannot be just a nice place people enjoy. Since they are spending so much to get there.  Hope that makes sense, from my pov.

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.