Bread Machines

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inncogneeto's picture
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Anyone use one? Have any good recipes? Mine is a few years old, and the recipes are really just the very basic of basic...Are the recipes for these machines pretty adaptable to any machine?

Thanks!

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I use a bread machine to mix on the dough cycle and knead.  Then I remove and form and bake like El does.

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I have a recipe for a Tuscan loaf that is out of this world. It starts the day before you bake it with a "madre" (mother) that you make. The madre takes 3 mintues toput together.  It rests and gets all wonderfully yeasty. Then you add the rest of the ingredients to the madre and finish it off. I have put olives in it and make an olive loaf. I have also put a store-bought-bruschetta topping in it. It is a simple recipe that can be adjusted to your tastes.

Does anyone have a good english muffin bread recipe that they are willing to share? I have heard of it, but never eaten it.

 

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Go to the recipe section here - there's an English Muffin Bread recipe posted. 

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JunieBJones (JBJ)'s picture
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Okay here is the definitive definition about the RASHER. 

We BBQ them in Australia.  Can you put American bacon on a grill outside to bbq?  Nope.  That is your answer right there.  So you can see how meaty and yummy they are.

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Morticia's picture
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So, all my Agatha Christie stories are referring to this kind of bacon when they say 'rashers of bacon'?

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JunieBJones (JBJ)'s picture
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Notice is if folded over.

gillumhouse's picture
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I always thought a rasher of bacon was a measurement as in how many slices of bacon. For some reason, I thought it was 3 slices of bacon or a serving.

Edited to say tis a bit of a slip from bread machines to Canadian and other bacon. To the Aspirings, this is why you read through our threads. One never knows where it is going to go.

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gillumhouse wrote:

I always thought a rasher of bacon was a measurement as in how many slices of bacon. For some reason, I thought it was 3 slices of bacon or a serving.

Edited to say tis a bit of a slip from bread machines to Canadian and other bacon. To the Aspirings, this is why you read through our threads. One never knows where it is going to go.

I always thought a 'rasher' was 2 slices. Turns out it's just the one slice.

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Ahhhh - English as A Foreign Language.

There were so many words that I took forgranted when I first got here ...

Rasher - in common-speak - is simply a slice of bacon.  One.  By implication it is probably a nice, thick, farmer's slice.

With so many Brit films / comedies etc out there most people know what a queue is by now, but fortnight always got me in trouble .... and back home it's an oft used word.   A fortnight's holiday .... see you in a fortnight .....  One friend confidently stated that it stood for "For Two Nights".  I also remember asking for a department in Bloomingdales and heading towards the escalators when told it was on The First Floor.  To me that meant the floor above the ground floor.

Of course, the most misunderstood, little-known words are slang terms that I've pretty much forgotton (especially as they tend to be very regional).  "Pillock" is one that comes to mind right now (goodness knows why)

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I use some 'Brit-speak' especially if I've been reading murder mysteries. And I DO know what a fortnight is. (Very proud I eventually figured that one out, who knows how!)

We had some US folks here the other day explaining 'floors' to their kid (maybe they live in a single floor house) and I wanted to say, 'Oh, that numbering doesn't work everywhere,' but I didn't want to confuse the kid (altho, I think he would have caught right on, he was pretty smart).

'Spliff' is the one I came across recently that took a few paragraphs to figure out. And then I found it in one of my crosswords!

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Bree wrote:

gillumhouse wrote:

I always thought a rasher of bacon was a measurement as in how many slices of bacon. For some reason, I thought it was 3 slices of bacon or a serving.

Edited to say tis a bit of a slip from bread machines to Canadian and other bacon. To the Aspirings, this is why you read through our threads. One never knows where it is going to go.

I always thought a 'rasher' was 2 slices. Turns out it's just the one slice.

our American bacon is totally fat and shrivels up to nothing.  The rashers are large meaty peice of bacon.  Nothing like this bacon here.  I cannot barely eat this bacon, once you have had the rashers.  They are, let's see - - twice as thick, twice as long and twice and wide.  2 slices of that alongside an egg, mmmmmm.

One slice on a burger, one slice fills a whole BLT sandwich.  And not all fat!

 

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Canadian bacon is a smoked cured back bacon ... not much fat.  Not sure why or when it became round.  When purchased from a real butcher it is just back bacon.

I think they made it round for English muffins.  Eggs Beni, etc. Eye-wink

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Cathy wrote:

Canadian bacon is a smoked cured back bacon ... not much fat.  Not sure why or when it became round.  When purchased from a real butcher it is just back bacon.

I think they made it round for English muffins.  Eggs Beni, etc. Eye-wink

WOW!!! THAT IS IT! YOU ARE RIGHT! For eggs bennie.  I think I read that somewhere.

inncogneeto's picture
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The stuff we buy is round, thinly sliced and tastes like smoked ham, it is fully cooked and really yummy, comes in a big pack at Sam's...It's very lean only 1.5 g fat per serving, 4 slices.

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It is round. BUT there is a canadian bacon that is more like a greasy ham product put on to pizzas here, typically with pineapple.

But to go to the store right now, it is a package like lunch meat with 6 slices of labeled "Canadian Bacon."  It tastes nothing like bacon. It is not cured nor smoked. Very bland.  Well it might be cured, but it doesn't taste like it.

 

JunieBJones (JBJ)'s picture
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wikipedia says:

In the United States, back bacon is called Canadian-style bacon or Canadian bacon, but this term refers usually to the lean ovoid portion.[3] In Canada, it is called peameal bacon, whereas bacon is used generally to refer to strip bacon, which is more common to the Canadian diet.

Here is the definition from Wisegeek

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I have several breads that are mix let rise for about 15 minutes, beat down and put in pans - English muffin bread which is a big hit for breakfasts and the herb bread that has people waiting for it at the Farmer's market. Each one needs about 15 minutes in the pans and it is ready to bake.

Cathy, I make my French bread for dinners - 1 loaf for the guest's dinner and the other loaf is their bread pudding for breakfast the next morning.

When making my white bread, I knead it nd set it to raise while I do other things and come back to do the shaping of the loaves and raise in the pan for baking while again doing someing else.

Kneading bread is where I get rid of my frustrations. Works wonders!

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Would love to have a copy of your bread recipes if you would be so kind as to share. 

First time for me making brown bread yesterday .. finally got some molasses that someone imported for me.  Will look for other recipes now. 

Are you in the kitchen all day.  Breakfast and dinner?  You do afternoon "snacks" as well right? 

My french bread recipe is easy to make and in this heat can be done in about 1 1/2 hours, but still not thinking I want to get up any earlier to make bread.  It is good toasted day after.

We are taking guests to the airport today (we charge the going rate for this trip) so I won't be able to make fresh bread for tomorrow.  I am thinking 2 day old bread for toast will be ok.

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Use the 2-day old bread to make either bread pudding or french toast. No one will know the difference - actually it will be better than fresh bread in either recipe, as long as it is not penicillen in the raw.

Will post the breads.

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gillumhouse wrote:

Use the 2-day old bread to make either bread pudding or french toast.

'Pain perdu' - lost bread. That's what I serve when I have French guests. Mostly because a teen this summer was sick to death of everything here being 'French-this' and 'French-that' and none of it is French! Hubs told her we only name the good stuff 'French'. That gave her something to think about.

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That's like the Canadian's, who when presented with Canadian bacon, said "That's Canadian Bacon? We've never had it before!" DH said, that's because in Canada, it's just called bacon.

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inncogneeto wrote:

That's like the Canadian's, who when presented with Canadian bacon, said "That's Canadian Bacon? We've never had it before!" DH said, that's because in Canada, it's just called bacon.

Is it? I would like to know the answer to this, thanks for bringing it up.  For all things trivial I have to know now.  Can our Neighbors to the North clarify please?

Is what we call "Canadian Bacon" your bacon?  Or is that just the name we Yanks have given it?  There are a ton of things like this (which I cannot think of right now of course) that are called something - FRENCH TOAST - French people do not eat this and they want to know why we call it this. 

FOSTER's the beer of Australia - which was an Export only and advertised to American's as the beer of Australia, which Aussie's don't drink. They drink Tooehy's or VB or one of the other beers popular there.

Bacon in Australia are RASHERS.  There is a small section of it which would be called the Canadian Bacon.  But what I find here in the states is the Canadian Bacon is HAM.  Not bacon at all.

Let's clarify the sit-chee-ashun.

inncogneeto's picture
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I don't think they call it bacon, he was just making a joke because if you're in Canada, why would you call it Canadian bacon? You're already there, so it would just be bacon...

 

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JunieBJones (JBJ) wrote:

inncogneeto wrote:

That's like the Canadian's, who when presented with Canadian bacon, said "That's Canadian Bacon? We've never had it before!" DH said, that's because in Canada, it's just called bacon.

Is it? I would like to know the answer to this, thanks for bringing it up.  For all things trivial I have to know now.  Can our Neighbors to the North clarify please?

Is what we call "Canadian Bacon" your bacon?  Or is that just the name we Yanks have given it? 

I've seen photos of what you neighbours to the south call 'Canadian bacon'. It looks like sliced bologna in these photos, perfectly round slices of meat. That's not what we call bacon. I don't see anything like that sold here with any kind of bacon-y term attached to it.

I used to think what you call Canadian bacon is the same as what we call back bacon or peameal bacon. That is, cured pork loin rolled in cornmeal. You must cook it before it can be eaten (unlike ham). It's usually thick-sliced and pan fried or grilled. The slices are oblong and irregular, definitely not round circles. It's called back bacon because it is comes from the back of the pig, not the side of the pig like regular bacon.

We just call call side (strip) bacon, bacon. Some people will refer to a rasher of bacon when they're buying a package of it, but that's more of a british term.

I'm really curious what Canadian bacon actually is for you guys. Does the package actually say Canadian Bacon? Why is it so round???

Neat topic.

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happyjacks wrote:
I've seen photos of what you neighbours to the south call 'Canadian bacon'. It looks like sliced bologna in these photos, perfectly round slices of meat. That's not what we call bacon. I don't see anything like that sold here with any kind of bacon-y term attached to it.

It's smaller than balogna.  It's a lot like ham.

happyjacks wrote:
I used to think what you call Canadian bacon is the same as what we call back bacon or peameal bacon. That is, cured pork loin rolled in cornmeal. You must cook it before it can be eaten (unlike ham). It's usually thick-sliced and pan fried or grilled. The slices are oblong and irregular, definitely not round circles. It's called back bacon because it is comes from the back of the pig, not the side of the pig like regular bacon.

Yes,  back bacon, but no cornmeal, already cured and cooked (usually), but I expect that's fairly recent and that a long time ago (before convenience foods caused our supermarkets to triple in size) our Canadian bacon was more like what you describe.

happyjacks wrote:
We just call call side (strip) bacon, bacon. Some people will refer to a rasher of bacon when they're buying a package of it, but that's more of a british term.

I don't hear rasher, but like you, side or strip bacon is just bacon.

happyjacks wrote:
I'm really curious what Canadian bacon actually is for you guys. Does the package actually say Canadian Bacon? Why is it so round???

Yes, it really does.  And like the others said, probably so it can fit nicely on an English muffin.

=)
Kk.

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Thank you.  I am looking forward to trying them after we get back from our 2 days off. 

We are taking a 2 day holiday to re-group and if we leave the city, we will not take any last minute bookings.  Just going to Puebla which is less than a 2 hour drive.  Talavera pottery anyone??

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Me! ME!

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OK will try to remember to take some pics of the purchases and send them to you so you can  choose.  We are going for small serving bowls and maybe a plate or two. 

Any special request?

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You are so sweet! No, I can't buy goodies right now, but thanks!!! I've always wanted one of those ceramic suns/moons...We had a beautiful Talavera tile dining table, that my dad made, with tiles my parents got on a trip to Guadalajara, when I was a kid... It was so pretty, wish I had it today! My mom used to collect those little terra cotta mexican owls and doves...

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Lost my machine in the divorce.  But I make it with my mixer.  I let it do most of the kneading for me, finish it up myself.

I make bread the day before as I only use it for toast.  Still fresh home made. Eye-wink I usually end up making a loaf every day unless it is pancakes or waffles the next day, then I get a day off.

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Cathy wrote:

Lost my machine in the divorce. 

I lost my mind, but it came back of its own accord...

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I've found that I make better breads with my hands than the bread machine does.  So, I gave my machine away.  The loaves weren't pretty and presentation (as well as taste) is a big deal in my business.

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I just usually use it to mix my doughs and the I shape and bake in the oven

inncogneeto's picture
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Can you freeze the doughs?

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For banana or zucchini bread I'd just freeze the bread.  Swirt did a double blind taste test and the frozen was actually (slightly) better than the fresh.

=)
Kk.

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YellowSocks wrote:

For banana or zucchini bread I'd just freeze the bread.  Swirt did a double blind taste test and the frozen was actually (slightly) better than the fresh.

=)
Kk.

I have a freezer full of frozen breads right now. They slice soooo much better frozen, too! It rarely gets eaten, maybe guests think it's 'leftovers' and don't touch it? So, more for me!

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Why would they think it is leftovers??? It is thawed by the time the guests get it....right?? Like you say..their loss...more for youSmiling

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catlady wrote:

Why would they think it is leftovers??? It is thawed by the time the guests get it....right?? Like you say..their loss...more for youSmiling

Because they think the bread is leftover from breakfast? Yes, it thaws very quickly. I unfortunately got a little behind the other day and put out frozen peanut butter cookies thinking they would defrost before the guests saw them. Nope. Got a sarcastic comment, 'Oh, fresh from the freezer!' Ha, ha.

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OOOPs... But if they didn't have it for breakfast..it isn't a leftover.

If I served banana bread or zuchhini bread for breakfast..I wouldn't serve it again on the same day.

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catlady wrote:

OOOPs... But if they didn't have it for breakfast..it isn't a leftover.

If I served banana bread or zuchhini bread for breakfast..I wouldn't serve it again on the same day.

Incoming guests don't know what was for that morning's breakfast. So I'm thinking that's why it sits there. They may realize when they have THEIR breakfast that there aren't any tea breads (I almost said 'sweet breads') on offer and wish they had tried the banana or squash bread the day before!

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Have you tried making them as muffins? I could imagine someone being a bit wary of a big loaf of something, especially if they didn't know what it was, how long it's been there, who held the loaf with their bare hand while cutting it... Muffins, perhaps because of their portability and what some consider one-bite consumption, have a strange way of disappearing in my kitchen.

And do you put a sign out saying what it is? Could see squash bread being a bit confusing. Other than that... no clue. I love free food.

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I always made my quick breads in the little individual mini loaf pans...that way one per person.

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I do post a little sign explaining what the snacks are if it isn't obvious. Also, if there is something in them a person could be allergic to or I've taken something out they might be allergic to. (The gluten-free p-nut butter cookies as an example.)

The loaves are too easy. But I see what you mean by 'who else has touched that sliced bread?'

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Sure, you can freeze bread dough.

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catlady wrote:

I just usually use it to mix my doughs and the I shape and bake in the oven

Ditto for me. While I enjoy kneading bread dough, I don't often have the time to be tied to the kitchen for the whole mix-rise-knead-rise process. My bread machine has a Dough cycle so it does all that then stops. I shape by hand and bake in the oven in regular loaf pans or free-form. Tastes no different than if I did it all unplugged.

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I guess not having to do the kneading is a plus...

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inncogneeto wrote:

I guess not having to do the kneading is a plus...

I thought you would be into that. 

Inn-cog-knead-dough 

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I am a bread baking machine today! But not yeast bread...I'm making more of the squash-zucchini bread before the squash goes bad. Poor hubs wants to know where it's all going to go.

Personally, I don't like the taste of bread machine bread. And that may be something to do with our machine. It always tastes somewhat like machine oil. If you have a sewing machine or hair trimmer, you know the oil I mean.

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You astound me each and every time .... How on earth do you manage to be a "bread baking machine" in August and sound happy about it.  I'm beyond impressed. 

I know that everyone on this forum goes "above and beyond" and delivers an incredible and consistent "product", but I also know you and your market and the thought of large scale baking, in August, has me amazed and in awe.

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The Tipsy Butler wrote:

You astound me each and every time .... How on earth do you manage to be a "bread baking machine" in August and sound happy about it.  I'm beyond impressed. 

I know that everyone on this forum goes "above and beyond" and delivers an incredible and consistent "product", but I also know you and your market and the thought of large scale baking, in August, has me amazed and in awe.

The secret is...multiple night stays. I'm done cleaning at noon. The bananas or squash or zucchini are going bad, I can't let that happen! More banana bread today, but it's my 'day off'. Last guests will be leaving momentarily and we'll clean, I'll do my own 5' stack of laundry and then I can relax!

I could not have done this in mid-August with multiple one nighters. But, at this time of year, it's more multiple nights and fewer rooms. I started to gather up all my marbles again.

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