TA's eco-friendly travel survey finds that travelers are growing

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 TA's eco-friendly travel survey finds that travelers are growing! See the results here: 

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Proud Texan's picture
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We've tried composting,  but the racoons and other critters usually dig it up and eat food scraps before they've had a chance to decompose.   We recycle,  but none of the recycling centers near us accept glass.   We hate putting glass into the landfill,  but we have no other choice.

 

Silverspoon's picture
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 We compost all of our vegetable and garden waste. The main thing to remember is that absolutely no cheese or meat can be included; otherwise the critters will dig it up.  We use a black plastic compost bin for plant-based scraps but all of our garden waste goes into the open pile. This pile has been cooking for over 20 years so each spring we load the best of it onto the garden as fertilizer.  Works great!

We also recycle glass, plastic and paper and kindly request that our guests set these materials aside so we can put them into the recycling center.  

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Ice
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Try the tumbler type for composing.  We have one and no critter problem!

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gillumhouse's picture
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Same here re glass. Back in the day, WV was a center of glass making. There were at least 8 different glass factories 10 miles from me - everything from window panes to canning jars. Some of the blowers have started their own home business. They make Christmas ornaments, napkin rings, stirrers, etc. My grandparents met at a glass factory. She lived in Ohio and Granny said there was a man with a ferry that took the workers across the Ohio River and in winter the river froze solid and he took them across in a horse-drawn sled. They married in 1915.

gillumhouse's picture
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I have been "GREEN" from the beginning but have been able to label (if I had a label) as such since 2004. If I have had 2 reservations because of it I am surprised. I find lights left on all the time - same as everyone else. My State DEP was a leader in this eco stuff - they have gone all over the Country doing training - but have yet to come up with a "Badge" or logo for us to display. They keep telling me they want it to have "substance" - the requirements to get the badge mean something. I keep telling them the Public sees the badge and has no idea what is behind it and does not care - they see a badge.

So after giving up business and spending a lot of time (and sleep since we had to leave @ 5:00 AM to be in class from 8 to 4 in Charleston) and gas to attend classes every month for a year, I have nothing to post other than my own words to say we did those classes. And when they did the on-site assessment of my property, I was told I was already DOING everything that I could do. Meanwhile, states all over the map have big Eco logos while I sit here with nothing.

Weaver's picture
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gillumhouse wrote:

I have been "GREEN" from the beginning but have been able to label (if I had a label) as such since 2004. ....

.....And when they did the on-site assessment of my property, I was told I was already DOING everything that I could do. Meanwhile, states all over the map have big Eco logos while I sit here with nothing.

And the worst part of it is "GREEN" ain't cheap!

gillumhouse's picture
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Actually, I look at the "Green" as the green IN my wallet. MY eco is ECOnomical. I am getting rid of those cfl lights that I did get at their behest - I do not want to bring mercury into my home. Bulbs break and then I will have a haz-mat scene. I do laundry in cold water, hang laundry on the line when possible, use perfume-free/dye-free detergent, cook "from scratch" to eliminate packaging, bnuy bulk if possible (less packaging). We recycle. We keep the thermostat low in winter and high in summer. That is as "green" as I am going to go. Solar/wind power? Ha! nope. I want efficiency and reliability.

I do the things I do because they make sense financially. The rest is - as far as I am concerned - a bunch of hooey.

Arks's picture
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gillumhouse wrote:

I am getting rid of those cfl lights that I did get at their behest - I do not want to bring mercury into my home.

I'm going with LED lights in my place. It costs more up front but pays for itself several times over in energy savings over the life of the bulb. And that bulb life is supposed to be 20-to-40 years so it should really help cut down on bulb changing maintenence, which is a huge plus for someone as lazy as I am.

A few years ago I got some LED bulbs from the cheapest source I could find, and found that after a year or so some of the LEDs in them...they have several in them in order to get them bright enough...I found that some of the LEDs in them start to go out.

But the ones from the brand name companies like GE and Sylvania seem to go on forever. I'm real happy with them, and no mercury (not that I'm that afraid of mercury).

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gillumhouse's picture
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and no mercury (not that I'm that afraid of mercury).

It is not that I am afraid of mercury, but there was such a stink about the mercury in thermometers and theat had to be replaced with something that was not hazardous but now it is OK to be required to have light bulbs that have mercury in them - almost a requirement. I do not want it in my home. A thermometer rarely broke. In all my years I cannot remember ever having one break but I have seen too many broken light bulbs to count!

Our daughter has been telling us about the LED bulbs. They are a possibillity in the future.

Weaver's picture
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01/24/2012

Couldn't agree more.   I compost because I don't have a garbage disposal.  I heat with wood cause the wood is free and the heating oil isn't.  I too wash in cold water cause I am too cheap to spend the money on heating oil which will heat my hot water when I want to take a shower.  I cook from scratch cause it is cheaper and better.  Old house means no central air, no problem, we only cool the rooms we are in when we are in them.  Cross ventilation is a wonderful thing.  All rooms have at least two doors so we only heat or cool those we need to be in at the time, opening or closing one is a great thermostat.

My son is the light nazi, he turns them off before I leave the room!  No lights on during the day, old houses have lots of windows.  Mine are almost all original, but PO put on good storm windows so no drafts.

I dry on the line when weather permits, had no choice for a while when dryer broke. Realized how much power it was using, we still do it when we can.

We recycle what we can't compost or burn.  Wont pay for trash service. 

Gardens are great if someone will weed them, my DS and DD don't weed. So the yeild isnt at it's highest. 

I am my version of green cause I am cheap. Oh and no gym membership here either...heavy bag and weights are in the carriage house/garage.  DS's buddies come over to chop wood for work outs, free labor!

Solar would be nice if it didnt cost so much to not get enough power to run the computer.  Trees are better for passive cooling and they are way prettier than solar panels on my old house. 

Green means so many things to so many people and trying to get "certified" may make a person certifiable.

Oh and one more thing, gutter broke on one side of the house so we stuck a trash can under it in the middle of a summer storm.  Watered the planters for a week on that.

No special light bulbs in overhead lighting, too old to handle the odd shape.  Installed low flow faucets and flushers to keep septic tank under control.  And when the neighbor's cows get loose about once a week they fertilize the lawn.  Also at no charge.

 

gillumhouse's picture
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Exactly! I got a grant for doing the classes and used it to buy a big composter. I have a Mantis with 2 compartments. I use one compartment for a year and then use the other one the next year. Each drum holds 25 bushels. It is on a stand and I crank it to turn it - can do with one hand.

Weaver's picture
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01/24/2012

We built our composter out of pallets, they were free, and when they start to break down, off to the burn pile with them!  DS needs to make a new one next week, he burned the last one.  6 pallets, super easy and $10 in hardware and left over chicken wire, it is all good.  May have to invest in a more modern one when free labor leaves for college.  I have 16 months max more likely 9 if he can work his schedule out.

Joey Camb's picture
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Weirdly had a phone call from the yorkshire Dales national park about this - questions on challenges businesses face in being green! was all prepped. Here they won't pick up any recycling you have to drive it to the tip which is a pain. They will in most parts of the town but where I am they don't want the boxes on the street on recycling day as the conference delegates may see them or fall over them and so we can't have them. Also they won't pick up from businesses! We do cardboard, electrical appliances, glass etc but have an arrangement with a nursary school - they take all small boxes and cardboard tubes for box modeling, Jam jars go to a local lady who makes jam and sells it, Egg boxes go to local people with hens and all these people collect so thats at least 3 trash bags less per week, Any magazines are reread by me and distributed to my friends. We use biodegradable shampoo and shower jell for guests and recycled black bags which are actually half the price of regular ones and lovely and thick. All windows replaced last year with Arated ( don't know if you have this in the USA but windows and appliances are rated a-d for efficiency with A being the best) instead of single glazed sliding sash ones vast improvement in warmth and sound, this year - new roof and water tank and a ton more insulation, Put all the shiny stuff down the back of the external radiators to help reflect heat back into the room cost about $6 so is worth a go. Introduced towels in the shower if you want them changing which reduced costs vastly, all newspapers go to my mum or sister who recycle them as they get pick up from their houses.

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Joey Camb's picture
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Not so as I noticed! go into every room for a service lights on, heaters on, fan's on! They want us to be green but for themselves they don't care.

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