Baked Egg success

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seashanty's picture
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06/02/2008

This isn't really a recipe, just a note about baked eggs that worked very well.  Helped with running a brunch this morning and we put one egg each in a greased muffin tin and set the muffin tins in larger pans of boiling water.  We baked about 12 minutes in a preheated 400 degree oven and they came out great.  Some we put a slice of cheese in as a cupcake lining, some we left out the cheese. 

We set out the muffin tins inside a couple of those big foil baking pans that you see at buffets over the hot water, put a cover on and they kept nicely warm.

The eggs slid out easily using two soup spoons.

We heated ham slices and sliced hot biscuits so folks could make their own breakfast sandwhiches.

They were devoured and we fed 50 people this way.  Not a lot of work, as we were able to put the eggs in the oven and do other things ...   

 

 

 

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 Refrigerating potatoes turns the starch to sugar. Usually takes more than one night though.

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I do a similiar recipe but they are in a greased ramekin.  I add chives, paramsan, rosemary, pepper, paprika, and two teaspoons of whipping cream but I bake at about 325-350.

Weaver's picture
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01/24/2012

Barry_Manilow wrote:

I do a similiar recipe but they are in a greased ramekin.  I add chives, paramsan, rosemary, pepper, paprika, and two teaspoons of whipping cream but I bake at about 325-350.

We used to make for a crowd of 100 very hungry athletes, we would pierce the yolk after craking into greased muffing cups, sprinkle some with just a little pepper, some had herbs such as chives, some shredded cheese, others just nekkid, most got a splash of milk/half n half.

The best part is we could set up all the muffin tins, cover with foil and refrigerate until the next batch was needed.  We would regulary serve 200-300 plus of these grab and go sandwiches with a fruit cup, and a small basket of home fries in under 2 hrs in a kitchen the size of an average walk in closet.  Most of the time they were on lightly toasted egg hamburger buns, those hold up well and for our purpose added some carbs.

We cooked at 375 for about 10-12 minutes, it worked for us because we could simultaneously bake potatoes for the home fries, and bake the eggs.  Amazing how much food an Olympic level athlete can consume in a matter of minutes.

My other comment was about home fries.  I have always done this but still get the funniest looks when I tell people.  I refrigerate large good baking potatoes the night before, bake them off with a little oil and kosher salt rubbed on the outside, prick ONCE, so they steam a little.  Then when I am ready for the next round of home fries, just rough chop, and sear the outside to a golden brown.  Makes for fast cooking, very little oil absorbtion, and a pretty sweet nugget of potatoey goodness.

 

Silverspoon's picture
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10/16/2011

 Why do you refrigerate the potatoes the night before...or am I missing something?  Do you bake them the day before and then refrigerate them?

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Weaver's picture
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01/24/2012

Silverspoon wrote:

 Why do you refrigerate the potatoes the night before...or am I missing something?  Do you bake them the day before and then refrigerate them?

I found that refrigerating them makes them have a slightly different taste.  Almost sweet but not like a sweet potato.  I found it by accident. I bake them the day I plan on cooking so they are hot when they hit the pan, makes for fast browning, a great texture and awesome crunchy baked potato taste.  I just grab a hot potato, (sorry for the pun), cut it once lengthwise, and then about 5 or 6 cross cuts.  If its a real big one I cut into 4ths lengthwise (so you have 4 large wedges) and then cut each wedge into 3/4" to 1" chunks, toss them into a hot pan with hot oil and in 5 min you have fresh hot home fries.  (Also works great for hot german potato salad, brown on one or two sides before dressing; ads a whole different dimension to the salad.)

Works great if you are going to make hash browns (or in my case latke), I chill overnight, bake them off but not super soft almost al dente, and then shred for hash browns, the tators are all but completely cooked and they brown nicely without having to wait for them to cook through.

It works with any potato but the best are good old fashioned russet baking potatoes, they tend to get the most from the concentration of the starches from the short chilling period.  I have chilled up to a week or more when the weather was hot, and I didn't have a cool dry place to store a 10# bag, after 36 hours you don't get too much more in the way of sweetness out of them.

 

 

Silverspoon's picture
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 One of our favorites is similar: buttered ramakin, chives on bottem, about 1 oz chunked cream cheese, 2 slightly beaten eggs, salt, pepper,  Tb. 1/2+1/2 and top with sharp cheddar.  Bake in water bath for 30 min. at 350.  Serve immediately for best presentation.

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