Need a little spice in your B&B breakfasts?

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Need a little spice in your B&B breakfasts? Here are five hot recipes. 

 

(You can see my comment on this topic on the article) Ole'

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Hey monkey see monkey do.

Besides all the inundation of advertising and coke machines on campuses, they follow whoever they are around, whether they have a parent at home, or whether it is just another kid who drinks coke for breakfast, which many do. Uh let's order a combo meal anywhere in the world, it will come with a soda drink 99% of the time, it's cheap.

It's always cheaper to eat poorly than to eat well. Of course many of us know the secret to this, k.i.s.s. and you eat better anyway! meat/fish-veg-starch/carb and you are good to go!  Make some casserole with 15 ingredients it always costs more...

They show up here (B&B) when they are grown and want coke for breakfast and won't touch any real food.

Nothing new under the sun.

Madeleine's picture
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Coke for breakfast I heard back in the 70's was a FL thing. When we have a run of GA guests we try to lay on the diet Coke because 9 out of 10 will ask if we have any. (And are completely amazed when we don't.)

I guess I would be surprised if someone didn't have OJ for brekkie.

Another take on that are the people who ask for grape juice, apple juice or V8 and then are put out because we say we have these options and we don't send someone out to the store right then and there to buy whatever it is they want. Grape jelly is another one. I have 4 different jams/jellies here and none of them will do. Grape.

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Breakfast Diva's picture
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Had a southern couple the other day. She wanted iced tea for breakfast. Uhhh, okkkkk, so I brewed up some tea and put ice cubes in it. I know iced tea is big in the south, but is it pretty common for them to drink it for breakfast?

 

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Breakfast Diva wrote:

Had a southern couple the other day. She wanted iced tea for breakfast. Uhhh, okkkkk, so I brewed up some tea and put ice cubes in it. I know iced tea is big in the south, but is it pretty common for them to drink it for breakfast?

 

I drink an iced coffee every morning.

When it gets real hot in the kitchen in the summer I may pour an iced tea vs iced water, I always have one of those - all ice, a little water, while I prep and cook for guests. 

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 Soda (coke or Dr.pepper) sometimes, iced tea occasionally. 

Breakfast Diva's picture
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Iced tea, no problem. Soda, they can bring themselves.

My mother was addicted to diet coke...even when she was less than 100 pounds. Brought it with her everywhere! She would drink that for breakfast instead of coffee.

gillumhouse's picture
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We never had soda - could not afford it when I was a kid. I still do not care for soda. However, I do want my food to be cold when it is cold. I do not care to see steam rising as it sits in the fridge. So I am a whuss.

Madeleine's picture
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This is totally off topic but why the heck is it that 'poor' people now seem to ONLY have soda and fast food and junk? If poor people years ago ate real food why not now? I'm not convinced it's about poverty but ignorance. We were poor but we had soda, as a treat. On Fridays, with pizza. Probably the only take out food I had until I was 20 or so.

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We aren't rich (aren't poor either- cuz we got love Smiling ) but there is NO way I would let the kids have free run of the food in this house. I buy the food with the intent to have it eaten- AS TIME GOES BY. It's called restraint. Respect. Self-control. And by golly, good manners.

gillumhouse's picture
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05/22/2008

We did not have a problem with the kids just "helping themselves" except with certain items of canned goods that we kept locked in our room (later found out the creeps picked the lock but knew better than to take). Black olives were not safe in the kitchen. One year for Christmas each kid got a can of black olives as part of their Christmas.

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My daughter LOVES black olives- I ate them by the crate when I was preggers with her. She blames me for her love of them Smiling

gillumhouse's picture
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You are a lot younger than I am. My Mother was Depression in Chicago (Daddy was on a farm and they hardly knew there was one) with a divorced mother with 7 kids. We lived on a farm and Daddy worked in the steel mill - so we ate great but never went to restaurants and I grew up pre-greasy Macs. Ice cream was our "treat".  Daddy got a 6-pack of beer on payday in Summer only (payday was every 2 weeks). Mom made our clothes - good material because that would last. Soda was one of the things that was just not bought in our house.

Today, I think soda is actually cheaper than milk and that is why it is the norm. And when mothers started working, take-out was faster and easier after a long day of work - people forgot how to cook. Do they even have home-ec classes in schools today? They have the food police dictating what can be had to eat in school, but is anyone actually TEACHING nutrition and how to cook real food? I honestly do not know since I have gotten rid of all my rugrats a LONG time ago.

Madeleine's picture
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Another thing that is different is that we were not allowed to 'help ourselves' to anything in the fridge or the cupboards. We had to ask first. That way our parents had control over how much and what we kids ate. Because I wasn't home when my kids got home from school they had a section of the fridge and the cupboard that were for 'after school snacks' and that's what they were allowed to have.

If they had junk food they bought it themselves. And walked or biked to the store to get it.

(You're not that much older than I am...)

gillumhouse's picture
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We did not have "store bought" - Mom baked everything and we just ate - I think. That was a long time ago. The only time I remember NOT being permited to eat whatever was if we turned our nose up to something served at a meal. No problem but you did not get anything else until you were hungry enough to eat that.

We did not have a lot of junk food in our house as the kids were growing up. I just never bought it - never thought of it actually since I was a product of my upbringing. I was not one to do something because we did not do it when I was growing up and I could do it now. I baked our bread and cookies and canned even though I was working full-time and part-time. For me, it was what Mothers did. And no - it did not pass down to my daughters as they were kind of set in things before they became my daughters.

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 See...Nutrition, Family Relationships, Money Mgt......that was the role of what was then called "home economics" classes...I used to teach oh so many many years ago. But they cut us out over the years in many school districts. Something they thought was just a minor thing...played such a major role. A shame it is not a requirement. We need it back. Now called fyi..... Family & Consumer Sciences.

Madeleine's picture
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It was required when my kids were in jr high. They had to take 'Home Ec'. They also had a class called 'The way things work' which allowed them to disassemble equipment and then put it back together to see ho it worked. (Lawn mowers, toasters, stuff like that.)

I'm glad it was required because it gave both of them a working knowledge of the kitchen and the garage!

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