Faux painting? Faux marble, faux granite?

4 replies [Last post]
seashanty's picture
Offline
Joined:
06/02/2008

 Has anyone done faux painting ... to look like marble or granite?  I am gearing up to do this 

I love a good, break my nails, get dirty project (so appealing, I know)

I want to do faux granite countertops in the kitchen ... but it seems what the owners are gravitating towards is actually the look of marble ... not granite ...  fine by me.

I looked at the peel and stick faux granite and I don't think that will hold up, plus I didn't find it in the colors the family wants (it's not my kitchen)

So far, I've stripped the walls of the 50 year old orange and yellow wallpaper, repaired the holes in the plaster, painted the ceiling and put the base coat on the kitchen cabinets.  

The family can afford paint and my (free) labor which is why we aren't buying new counters.  

so ... hmmm ... I guess I'm just wondering if there are any do-it-yourself-ers out there who might've tackled this kind of project.

 

 

__________________

Wear cute PJ’s to bed; you never know who you may meet in your dreams.

 

Weaver's picture
Offline
Joined:
01/24/2012

I have, you need special countertop paint. check the big box stores for the right brands and combinations. prepare you counters according to directions and put on a good base coat, let it dry completely.

Pick the style and color combination of marble you want.  If you can buy a 12 by 12 tile it will help you a lot.  You can always return it when you are done using it as your model.

The real tricks are

1 - the right base color - usually the darkest or the lightest color in the range of the multi colored marble, sometimes the mid range is best with both lighter and darker colored veins - this is true for

2 - using a thin long wispy liner brush for the veining, use a very light touch you can add more but taking it away is much harder.

3 - a super soft dry brush to get the soft fuzzy lines and color blending, dry brush and blend in multiple directions, not at right angles, and not in circles unless you are going for an onyx look.

4 - for a counter top SEALING IT WITH THE RIGHT sealer  - don't cheap out here, sometimes if your paint is compatible a clear epoxy is a good solution.

dark green marble

This green marble has both light and dark veining with the mid range being the main color or background.

 

Madeleine's picture
Offline
Joined:
09/29/2011

I've seen it done, but have never done it myself. The secret was fine brushes to create the veining. Marble is probably easier to faux paint than granite. You need several different shades of the same color to get a good veining effect.

(BTW, all of the marble pillars and walls in Vegas? All faux painted.)

This looks like a decent set of instructions and there is a video as well. http://gorgeousshinythings.blogspot.com/2011/03/how-to-happy-hour-faux-c...

__________________

Everyday, for good or ill, we intersect with some else's story and become a part of it.

 

Arks's picture
Offline
Joined:
05/22/2010

You might see here about epoxy countertop coating. First you apply whatever material you want: paint, sand, probably even the peel and stick stuff, then you apply a coat of epoxy over it and heat it with a hair dryer to drive out air bubbles. It basically self-levels itself and dries to a hard, clear surface that will hold up to usual kitchen use.

It's kind of like the old decoupage technique but instead of a dozen thin coats of polyurethane on top, it's one thick strong coat of epoxy. I saw one show on DIY network where they broke up colored glass in a sack, spread it over the counter top and poured this epoxy over it (a very thick layer). It ended up a smooth hard countertop with all these colored glass fragments visible through the clear epoxy. Cool.

Haven't tried it but they made it look easy on DIY. They make everything look easy!

__________________

All saints can do miracles, but few of them can keep hotel. ~ Mark Twain

 

Weaver's picture
Offline
Joined:
01/24/2012

Arkansawyer wrote:

You might see here about epoxy countertop coating. First you apply whatever material you want: paint, sand, probably even the peel and stick stuff, then you apply a coat of epoxy over it and heat it with a hair dryer to drive out air bubbles. It basically self-levels itself and dries to a hard, clear surface that will hold up to usual kitchen use.

It's kind of like the old decoupage technique but instead of a dozen thin coats of polyurethane on top, it's one thick strong coat of epoxy. I saw one show on DIY network where they broke up colored glass in a sack, spread it over the counter top and poured this epoxy over it (a very thick layer). It ended up a smooth hard countertop with all these colored glass fragments visible through the clear epoxy. Cool.

Haven't tried it but they made it look easy on DIY. They make everything look easy!

the epoxy is NOT easy, it is easy to mix, easy to pour, but the edges are a pain in the A**!  Build a small frame around the countertop lip to allow you to either fill or catch the drips for the epoxy.  you can sand or steel wool any imperfections if you want.  Alternately you can build up the edge with inexpensive base moulding and create a lip and edge and then fill the countertop with the epoxy, eliminating the edge drippy mess and pain. 

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.