Myth #5: The breakfasts are fattening and unhealthy.

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Myth #5: The breakfasts are fattening and unhealthy. Breakfasts are the cornerstone of a B&B, and innkeepers take pride in their creations. From low-fat or low-carb options to dietary restrictions such as gluten-free, they can create a special dish using one of their healthy recipes just for you (with advance notice, of course).  from here.

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Thank you again! 

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Thanks all,

Just googled GF. Looks like corn is considered GF as long as it's not processed or mixed with wheat flour. They may be able to use the masa harina they already have on hand for tamales and make corn tortillas and keep them in the freezer for guests.  

As for the GF bread, I am looking at some recipes and I am worried about them being able to get some of the ingredients down there. They can make the rice flour but I'm not sure where they would find xantham gum or guar gum in Central American markets. Where do you guys source this in the US? Mail order?

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Take a look at the cornbread recipe here.  It is my go-to recipe for GF folks and suitable for everyone with no exotic ingredients.  

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Bob's things are good. I have made up gluten free breads and frozen for use later on. Works just fine when a surprise guest shows up who didn't inform you Sad

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Health food internet or go to http://www.bobsredmill.com/gluten-free/ for a lot of it. They may be able to get by with just a couple bags of the all-purpose mix. I think I used one bag to make a loaf at Thanksgiving. I used half of that loaf to make stuffing fot her.

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Hi guys, just diving in here as a new poster. My parents run a B&B in Central America and get a lot of American and Canadian guests. Most of the guests are looking for a "local" style breakfast and will eat whatever is put in front of them. At my parents place that means: homemade bread or tortillas, eggs, beans or fish, fresh tropical fruit, cheese, coffee and tea. That is how the locals eat and most guests want to taste for themselves. They very rarely serve meat at breakfast. Fish is common though. 

A small fraction of their guests do have strict dietary requests and my parents are always looking for ways to accommodate them but they have one cook and sometimes up to 20 people to serve. 

If they were in a cooler climate I would suggest making a small crock of oatmeal for those guests who would choose it but it's way too warm down there for hot cereal. 

Not being familiar with vegan and GF diets, my parents asked me to research what options they might keep on hand for those requests. 

Thanks in advance. 

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Do a search here for vegan or gluten free, you will find all sorts of information. There are lots of web sites out there as well that will give you tons of information if you just google it. Best wishes.

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Newbatgirl wrote:

Hi guys, just diving in here as a new poster. My parents run a B&B in Central America and get a lot of American and Canadian guests. Most of the guests are looking for a "local" style breakfast and will eat whatever is put in front of them. At my parents place that means: homemade bread or tortillas, eggs, beans or fish, fresh tropical fruit, cheese, coffee and tea. That is how the locals eat and most guests want to taste for themselves. They very rarely serve meat at breakfast. Fish is common though. 

A small fraction of their guests do have strict dietary requests and my parents are always looking for ways to accommodate them but they have one cook and sometimes up to 20 people to serve. 

If they were in a cooler climate I would suggest making a small crock of oatmeal for those guests who would choose it but it's way too warm down there for hot cereal. 

Not being familiar with vegan and GF diets, my parents asked me to research what options they might keep on hand for those requests. 

Thanks in advance. 

Red Mi ll makes a GF all-purpose mix. I figure if I make a loaf of GF bread, I have a minimum of 3 breakfasts.

#1 = eggs & toast & the eggs can be variations to make more breakfasts (baked with different herbs or fried or poached)

#2 = French Toast

#3 = bread pudding

For vegans just make a baked or fried potato casserole (fry in corn , olive, or safflower oil) - potato slices or chunks with peppers, corn, tomatoes, whatever veggies available. The rule with vegans is they do not eat anything with a face or feet or product thereof. The face rules out fish and the feet eliminates honey for instance. Whatever fruits, veggies, nuts, and grains they have at their disposal will work for them.

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 Cardboard Smiling

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No no no....coffee mugs need to be at least 10 oz AND they have to have good heat retention.    I can't tell you how many coffee mugs I've given away over the years that haven't had heat retention.

That's the one thing I dislike about most dish sets - the coffee cups are ridiculously small.

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I had my coffee cups (mugs really I guess) made by a potter here in WV. I told him I wasnted a cup big enough to be a CUP of coffee and a handle a man could wrap his hand around and not burn his fingers. Each one is individually "thrown" and signed by the potter. No two are exactly alike.

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 Bacon is unfortunately low in protein...which just means you have to eat more of it so you get enough protein.    

 

Interesting that they do a sweet fruit AND a sweet entree....I'm with you, it needs something savory to balance it out.   

 

 

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SM101 wrote:
Interesting that they do a sweet fruit AND a sweet entree....I'm with you, it needs something savory to balance it out.   

We alternate between sweet and savory entrees, but always have a breakfast meat on the side.  On the morning I do sweet entrees, I still have a fruit course but it tends toward unadulterated fruit, or with yogurt added to it for some protein, like the breakfast banana split or chilled peach soup.

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 I did the same...a less sweet fruit option on the day of a sweet entree.  Savory mornings they might get something as sweet as a fruit crisp!  

We had a small breakfast today at this inn, plated on a smaller plate to look larger - half a strawberry and one quarter of a slice of orange garnish.  What?????  And the smallest coffee mugs I`ve ever seen...held less than a china cup, I think.  I had to get up and refill it 4 times so my breakfast got cold.  Sad

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I hate it when garnish is supposed to be your fruit! I stayed at an inn once where the innkeeper sliced a third of a slice of cantaloupe so think you could see through it! Cheap...cheap...cheap...

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 Just back from a lovely 5 nights in Maine....where we ate everything put before us and loved it!  Granted, I did have to request a small glass of milk for a bit of protein on the days we were served pancakes,  but other than that....what diet?

So today  we are back in business and have one gluten-free and, up until this morning, a "I may not stay on my diet so don't worry about me".  Then the e-mail came....she's sticking to her diet...no grains, except rice...no dairy, no soy, no sugar.  She'll eat a scrambled egg as long as the egg white is not apparent.  So, that's what she'll get for 3 mornings....scramled eggs it is!  Everyone else will get a regular, mostly healthy breakfast.  Really, some people really miss out on life, don't you think?

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I tried to book into a B & B for the Illinois trip. It would have been a 3-nights Sun - Tues. I called 3 times (hung up first time when noticed the time w/b breakfast there) and left messages twice. E-mailed asking about stairs at their cottage and availability - the web site sucked re info. To this day - no answer period! So we went motel.

Breakfast morning #1 - 8:30 AM no eggs, no yogurt. The waffle maker never made a cooked waffle (tried twice) - just dug it out and ate the darn things. Morning #2 - 8:00 AMwaffle worked better but still not "done". No eggs and no yogurt. Morning #3 - 7:30 AM  woohoo boiled eggs and yogurt and the freaking waffle machine actually cooked the waffle!!

They had bagels, juice, bread for toast (but morning #1 toaster was not working per s-i-l), apples, cereal/instant oatmeal, coffee, and milk every morning and morning #3 there were small donuts. Breakfast was blah!!

This morning my vegan had baked oatmeal and her husband had the egg bake with whole wheat toast (I made wheat bread last night). He is severe diabetic. I made peanut butter banana muffins using stevia (put choc chips in the remaining batter for my walk-ins - blessedly normal people).

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 (off topic, well not really...) So when you had pancakes you weren't served scrambled eggs with them? No meat? (on your getaway).  Did you have plenty of fruit with the breakfasts? Always curious to find from the innkeeper sitting on the other side of the table.

I had a no show for breakfast this morning. They said they didn't know we served breakfast. ? B&B? Confirmation, breakfast photos on the website, breakfast questions on the online res form, me - physically showing them yesterday the dining room where they will have breakfast...some people are just awful liars, and it makes me madder. If they said "we wanted to sleep in" then sobeit, but don't pack a lie onto it.

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 We really like this B+B but my one gripe is that they do not have any protein on the mornings they serve the sweet entree.  But they are very accommodating to providing a glass of milk, which is enough to save me from having low blood sugar by 10 am. They have also cut back on baking muffins, so we didn't see any sweet baked goods while there this time.   Here's what they served for the 4 mornings we were there (plus they packed us a nice bag breakfast on the day we left because we headed for home at 6 am.)

Day 1:  lemon poached pears       pancakes with syrup

Day 2: poached peaches with mascarpone cheese      frittata with veggies and cheese, toast  and a side of cukes/sundried tomatoes...kind of a small salad but delicous

Day 3: peaches and pears, cut up with lime and mint      waffles with syrup

Day 4: pear/cranberry crumble      southwest egg bake   biscuit  with side of corn/bean salad

 

Personally, I always provide some protein either with meat, yogurt, milk or eggs.  Doesn't it seem strange to you that anyone would not?   It's not a deal breaker for us, but it does point out that a few more things on the plate might nicely round out the meal.  And, just so you don't accuse me of hyjacking this thread,I think a healthy breakfast should always have some form protein as an option.

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Silverspoon wrote:

I think a healthy breakfast should always have some form protein as an option.

 

Like bacon? Eye-wink

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Bacon??? Gimmee, gimmee, GIMMEE!!!!!!!!!!! Nice & crisp!

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 Bacon works for me!  And PLEASE..don't tell me it's not healthy...I ain't listening!

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Silverspoon wrote:

 Bacon works for me!  And PLEASE..don't tell me it's not healthy...I ain't listening!

Bacon is healthy. It makes us happy---

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That is very interesting. I wanted to know...

I am the first person to admit I don't want a sweet breakfast, there may be a sweet component, sure. I am the one who tried out the "steak and eggs" for Father's day or whatever here. And fruit, I want it pure, I don't want it hot or cooked. Just me, how I like things.

I require protein, I also require some form of fiber, so however that works out in a breakfast is how I like it. Fresh fruit is hard to find eating out, but at a B&B I expect it. 

I appreciate all different takes on breakfast, if you take the time to make it I will enjoy it no matter what. But what I prefer, is well my own take on it. 

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ive had this before - ie thought they had to pay extra for it if they came but I was telling them it was avaliable if they wanted to come -

Uh No - I have to know the night before how many so we can prepare enough breakfasts!

Left my mum in charge and yes there is always some problem when I return - told the people in the room directly above our bedroom that it would be fine to bring back their adult grandson to sleep on the sofa when they return from a wedding ie 3 people crashing about over our heads! I always vet who goes in this room ie older people not staying out late so I don't have this problem. However the grandson may not stay at all so has jiggered me for breakfast numbers and for fire regs - just ruddy great!

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 The plates are licked clean.   I don't think it matters if they are healthy meals or not.    Let 'em go eat tofu and seaweed at an expensive spa if they want healthy.

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No gluten, no dairy, etc. I get all the time. I can not remember the last time I had someone ask for a 'healthy' breakfast. I'm not exaggerating....it's been at least 5-6 years!

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About 5-10 percent ask for healthy. Hubby usually gives them a full breakfast anyway. Fruit course, bread course which may include fruit, and meat with two sides.

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We have guests who say they want to eat 'healthy' and I have to wonder WTH that means? What do they want? I have no idea. Makes me crazy when people aren't specific.

We had a bunch of vegans a few weeks ago who went out of our way to cook for but, of course, at dinner they ate what they wanted. Diabetics are another group we have trouble with- some adjust their meds to compensate, some look at me with withering contempt when I put a bowl of fruit in front of them, some say, 'I'm on vacation, I'll eat anything!' How are we supposed to know which kind of diabetic we're getting? I have one who brings her own food. Another who announces her blood count at the table before telling me it's either ok or not to have a pancake.

Lactose intolerant is the same. Some people compensate, others mean they can't drink milk but it's ok cooked in food, others say no dairy products in any form.

Guests have to be more specific if a food will cause them distress. Last year we started pinning guests down during the booking process...'What does that mean in terms of breakfast food?' And, of course, the 'other' person was making the rez so they didn't really know what it meant. We go over it again at check-in.

But we still get the ones who turn the food down at the table. Those who never mentioned a thing about not liking eggs get served eggs. Can't eat bread? You're gonna get pancakes, it's almost a given you're going to get what you can't eat if you don't tell us!

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What drives me crazy are the people who say they are lactose intolerant but don't actually know what is low in lactose and what isn't. The higher the fat, the lower the lactose. And fermented items (as long as milk solids aren't added) are low lactose as well, so yogurt is usually fine. But we go out of our way to get them coconut milk or almond milk yogurt. We even get them lactose free milk or almond/rice milk. 

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I have had a few thank yous for doing a heart-healthy breakfast. Some of my rail-trail guests have been "health nuts" that the low-fat etc breakfasts have reeled in for us.

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I do low-fat, low cholesterol but I do not think it is obvious - at least not from the comments in the books. The great breakfast is the most common comment - either before or after the great conversation.

I do not keep cereal, bread or milk in-house unless I know a kid id coming and then I get some. I bake bread when the spirit moves me (English muffin bread is made in the morning w/breakfast. I use powdered milk in baking - it is just skim milk with the water removed and has a VERY long shelf life. If drinking it, I go buy some. The people tomorrow have "ordered" their breakfasts. The e-mail I received:

My husband asked me to give you the following additional information:
 
“Let her know that I am diabetic and prefer eggs and whole wheat toast (with meat, such as sausage).  I only get away with the cereal at home because I rigidly control the type and amount of cereal I eat.  Even then it sends my blood sugar up. Prefer skim milk or water to drink.
Don”
 
I mostly eat cereal (shredded wheat and bran) with unsweetened soy milk, but also like oatmeal and other hot cereals, whole-grain pancakes (without milk or eggs), and muffins and other baked goods (again, without milk or eggs or large amounts of sugar).  Fresh fruit is always good.
 
We look forward to our stay at Gillum House.
 
 

I replied I planned to make baked oatmeal with Sple nda (she says without the Splen da because she does not like things too sweet). I will cook and they will eat or they will not...

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gillumhouse wrote:

My husband asked me to give you the following additional information:

 
“Let her know that I am diabetic and prefer eggs and whole wheat toast (with meat, such as sausage).  I only get away with the cereal at home because I rigidly control the type and amount of cereal I eat.  Even then it sends my blood sugar up. Prefer skim milk or water to drink.
Don”
 
I mostly eat cereal (shredded wheat and bran) with unsweetened soy milk, but also like oatmeal and other hot cereals, whole-grain pancakes (without milk or eggs), and muffins and other baked goods (again, without milk or eggs or large amounts of sugar).  Fresh fruit is always good.
 

 

I hate people like this. Stay home already.

Who are they, Jack Sprat and the Missus? They have exactly the opposite diets.

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DH and I are Jack Sprat & wife in person. He will not touch anything with fat (not more than eating half of my portion anyway) and I never met a piece of chocolate, crisp bacon, hunk of cheese, etc that I did not like!

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I love grits, both as a hot cereal and the cheesy/garlicy version. It's part of the southern experience!

Instant grits aren't bad. Just open a paper pouch into a bowl and add hot water.

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 Most will "cheat" on their diets while here because they are somewhere special. Even the diabetics...they say they'll just adjust their med.  I, too, don't cook low fat, low sugar for our breakfasts. If they don't want what I prepared, they just eat around it. If someone let's me know in advance they just want toast, or just cereal, I'll do it. But I don't usually have milk, cereal or bread on hand for that. We don't use any of that personally. The bit of milk I use in recipes is frozen.

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 We serve a big hearty breakfast, but it's not anything fancy that you'd see in a magazine or guest chef column.  We have alot of people tell us that they are able to skip lunch because the breakfast lasted them all day - that's a compliment and added value as we're saving them money in our expensive little town.  And for the most part we get back empty plates.

If someone asked for just toast, I'd see that as a food-cost savings and one less plate I'd have to prepare.  On a full day we have 16+ at the table at once, so one less is nice when we're scrambling to feed everyone. 

I, too, believe that they're on vacation so they expect to break diets.  I'd definitely give healthier versions of what everyone else is getting if I was asked ahead of time.  

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 Toast only throws a spanner into the mix. a deviation. I buy the food for the guests, so it is not a cost saver for me. I had an email today asking for grits. They are here one night on this holiday long weekend and want grits. I don't serve grits.

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I can't believe that you don't serve grits! 

We didn't serve them that much, but people always asked about them.  I never served grits as a hot cereal type of thing.  Fancy cheesy grits as a side.

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Samster, you must be in the South. We served grits (hubby insisted) and the guest refused them. Nobody has asked about them. Not that they aren't good. I've never developed a taste for them, but probably wouldn't turn them down.

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Not just the South, MM, the Deep SouthSmiling  My husband is from the NE and he still doesn't understand what grits are.  He is not a fan.  Haha...

When I served them, if guests just gave them a try, that was OK by me.  Many folks just want to sample what the local fare is.  Eye-wink

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K9 wrote:

I, too, believe that they're on vacation so they expect to break diets.  I'd definitely give healthier versions of what everyone else is getting if I was asked ahead of time.  

We have guests who not only won't break a 'diet' they also bring their own coffee, tea, sweeteners, etc. We can't even make smaller portions of anything we serve, DH just cannot do small. I tell guests to eat what they want and leave the rest, we'll understand.

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If someone asks for 'healthy', I'll do it. Most folks though want to inndulge a little.

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 I serve a ton of fruit, they can just eat that if they want.  When people say I just want toast, it hurts, deep inside this innkeeper's soul...

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Joey Bloggs wrote:

 When people say I just want toast, it hurts, deep inside this innkeeper's soul...

Some of them have been on vacation for a week, they are done in! It's not personal. (The Italian women all eat pane tostada con marmalata and that's it.)

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Madeleine wrote:

Joey Bloggs wrote:

 When people say I just want toast, it hurts, deep inside this innkeeper's soul...

Some of them have been on vacation for a week, they are done in! It's not personal. (The Italian women all eat pane tostada con marmalata and that's it.)

Yeah see let's just say, I have been in one nighter-ville for way too long. So almost ALL of our guests right now are here for a special ocassion or on the road and want a nicer than hotel breakfast. Anyone who is traveling for a while might be a different story, so I hear ya loud and clear.

One repeat guest tells us we are the only place he eats breakfast, it is a badge of honor with him. Last week our young 20's stayed an additional night, and I quote "This is the greatest breakfast! Let's stay another night" which I found to be the best compliment in the world.  Now they were pretty much living in a pig sty in their room, but hey can't win 'em all!

So we do what we do. We hope everyone likes it. But please, don't say "I'll just have a piece of toast" ...boo hoo hoo 

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Joey Bloggs wrote:

So we do what we do. We hope everyone likes it. But please, don't say "I'll just have a piece of toast" ...boo hoo hoo 

Glad they liked the breakfast!

You know, after a week in GA a few years back I really, really did not want another pork product at all. Toast or cereal would have been about all I could handle.

It's tough...I don't want to ask for just toast but I also don't want someone to cook up a big breakfast I just cannot eat.

When we went to our B&B class the owners put on a show for us in re breakfast. I got thru the fruit course and the crepe course and then they brought out a big mess o something and I blurted out, 'There's MORE?'

How are we to know what's 'enough'? Guests are packing it in at the restaurants and are coming to the table stuffed from the night before. Or NOT. We just never know!

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 My response:

Too hard to do a poll on this one, but fattening and unhealthy are in the eye of the beholder.  I don't do cook to order breakfasts, and I don't do low fat options. I am not a dietition, I cook for 12+ people at once, and unless an allergy, they get a delicious homecooked breakfast. If they want to add butter to their pancakes, that is up to them. Smiling

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We don't do 'healthy' and we've been told that by guests who are on strict rationing of calories. You're not getting a low fat, low carb, low sugar hunk of cardboard on the plate here. We believe in flavors, fats, sugar, fruit! If you're 'dieting' or 'don't eat that' then don't eat that!

I've seen scathing reviews going both ways...'health food crap' and 'a plate of carbs and butter'. We've been told our portions are too large and not enough and just right.

C'mon people, you're on vacation. Relax the rigidity for 2 days already.

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Speaking of rigidity... of course you have the right to serve whatever you want in your B&B, but what about bending the rules a little bit to accomodate guests? You can have different options, so even the uptight, health food lovers can have their share.

A little bit of this and a little bit of that would be the perfect balance - even in the personal diet, I believe. Nobody needs to either starve with tasteless food or eat 3 pounds of bacon every day Smiling

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