Coffee Supply?

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Hillbilly's picture
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I am in need of a new coffee supply. I did a search on here and didn't really find what I was looking for. I would like a really good coffee. I do know sometimes you can have a really bad cup of coffee. But the atmosphere you are drinking it in can help that. Funny how that works. But this next year, I want people to go "WOW" Thats a great cup of coffee.

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Hi! I didn't read all the way to the bottom, but we use Eight O'Clock Coffee, whole bean, red bag. We get it at Wal-Mart for about $15. Hy-Vee also carries it for about $5 more. Our Cuisinart coffee makers grind it moments before it is brewed. We get frequent comments on how good it is. Good to know it is widely available.

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remnjava wrote:

Hi! I didn't read all the way to the bottom, but we use Eight O'Clock Coffee, whole bean, red bag. We get it at Wal-Mart for about $15. Hy-Vee also carries it for about $5 more. Our Cuisinart coffee makers grind it moments before it is brewed. We get frequent comments on how good it is. Good to know it is widely available.

Eight O'Clock was the house brand of A & P in my Granny's day. The coffee aisle always smelled so good as people put the beans through the grinder as they purchased it. I used it before I got my roaster.

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We have a local roaster in our town. I had no idea. they also do private labeling if we would like to sell the coffee to guests. Funny how things work. they are coming out Thursday to talk with us and bring some samples for us to try. They also said, they deliver for free every week.

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Bob wrote:
We have a local roaster in our town. I had no idea. they also do private labeling if we would like to sell the coffee to guests. Funny how things work. they are coming out Thursday to talk with us and bring some samples for us to try. They also said, they deliver for free every week.

Sorry to come in so late... this is absolutely the way to go.  My coffee is "locally" roasted (unfortunately, they're about two hours away, but their son goes to college in my town so sometimes I don't have to pay shipping) and they created a label for me with my logo. 

I started using them to roast my coffee after they stayed here.  They came to the door with one of my old brochures that said, "Home roasted coffee."  I was like, "Oh, he left."  Now my brochures say, "Freshly roasted coffee."  They roast it up when I order it.

I had to name my coffee... tough to do since I don't actually drink coffee.  It's a breakfast blend, supposed to have a bit extra caffeine, so I named it Morning Jolt.  It's for sale in my dinky gift shop, and although I rarely sell it it's nice to have the option.

=)
Kk.

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Bob wrote:
We have a local roaster in our town. I had no idea. they also do private labeling if we would like to sell the coffee to guests. Funny how things work. they are coming out Thursday to talk with us and bring some samples for us to try. They also said, they deliver for free every week.

Good for you!

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YAY!!  And you would be supporting another local business if you buy their coffee!  Smiling

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gillumhouse's picture
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See what you find out when you pose a question.

Hillbilly's picture
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gillumhouse wrote:

See what you find out when you pose a question.

 

I love you guys!!!wink

gillumhouse's picture
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I use a percolator. All my pots are percs/

Arks's picture
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It's not hard to find a French press for sale here, but not many people use them because their grandmother didn't have one.

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Wow! Do you have one, JB? If not, somebody order one and report back! Coffee is important!

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Arkansawyer wrote:

Wow! Do you have one, JB? If not, somebody order one and report back! Coffee is important!

A super funky coffee roaster in a super funky one light town is having taste tests with all their coffees using this tomorrow. I can't make it, but i can see how I would love this!  DH saw disaster waiting to happen, if he used it, he felt if the cup had a fracture he might bust it.  I agree, need to test one in person. me likes me likes.  Smiling

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Joey Bloggs wrote:

...if he used it, he felt if the cup had a fracture he might bust it....

I thought the same but the physics major in me says the seal on the cup couldn't be that good.

I question some of the anti-drip statements. I've opened a dripper mid-cycle (forgot to add my hazelnut extract) and seen that even early on in the cycle the filter is half-full of water, backed up and waiting to drip through. I just don't buy that all the grounds aren't good and equally soaked and used, and that the water is cold by the time it drips through them all. Maybe in the first few seconds, but after that, no problem.

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I have to share this with you, this is a way to make a great cup of coffee!

 

Drip Brewing
Traditional drip brewing passes water through a bed of grounds. When the water first drips into the bed, it is too hot and bitterness is extracted. As the water filters downward through the bed, it becomes too cool and extraction is weak. The water doesn't contact all of the grounds uniformly. Grounds at the edge of the bed are under-extracted, while grounds at the center are over- extracted and contribute bitterness.
Total immersion of the grounds in the AeroPress completely solves these problems. All of the grounds contact the same water temperature, and the brewing process is short and sweet. The gentle air pressure of the AeroPress also extracts extra flavor from the coffee. Ordinary drip brewers leave a lot of flavor in their soggy grounds.

The drip method cannot make a robust single cup because the small amount of water doesn't heat the bed enough for rich extraction. It is also slow. AeroPress makes one to four servings with a single pressing in less than a minute. The flavor is equally rich for any number of cups.

video here

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I would be happy if I had the French press that I want...but I will wait for it...

Joey Camb's picture
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french presses's seem hard to get in the USA - here in the UK they sell them everywhere ie all the super markets all over!

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No you have the wrong information. They are found everywhere. That is all my husband will use for his coffee.

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camberleyhotelharrogate@yahoo.co.uk wrote:

french presses's seem hard to get in the USA - here in the UK they sell them everywhere ie all the super markets all over!

They are sold everywhere here.

I am not a fan because the coffee goes cold too quickly. I use the personal size for a one cup if at a coffee house. I am a fan when we camp, they are a great way to get a good cup of coffee. Boiling the kettle on the fire.

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Joey Bloggs wrote:

camberleyhotelharrogate@yahoo.co.uk wrote:

french presses's seem hard to get in the USA - here in the UK they sell them everywhere ie all the super markets all over!

They are sold everywhere here.

I am not a fan because the coffee goes cold too quickly. I use the personal size for a one cup if at a coffee house. I am a fan when we camp, they are a great way to get a good cup of coffee. Boiling the kettle on the fire.

We have 2 of these Bodum stainless steel thermal French presses for our guests. Since we're in the land of really strong coffee (Pacific Northwest), we serve those guests who want really strong coffee with this FP. Since it's thermal, it keeps the heat and because it's stainless steel, the guests can't break it! They're expensive though. We paid $60 each several years ago. It's an 8 cup model and they do make smaller ones.  I really prefer FP over drip.

.

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They go for $80 these days. http://www.wayfair.com/Bodum-Columbia-8-Cup-Double-Wall-Stainless-Steel-French-Press-Coffeemaker-1308-16-BMO1049.html

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Just found this French press at Marsh alls for $20!  The 4 cup is perfect for me, the price was right, and the stainless steel outer holder does keep the coffee hot (not that it lasts that long).  I have been enjoying using it now for several days.

This discussion prompted me to look again when I was out holiday shopping for gifts.  Thanks everyone! 

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Good deal! Happy French pressing!

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Here's the funny thing... I only drink decaf coffee now (for health reasons)!  But this French press coffee is excellent.

I now own the following: an old percolator, a Melitta drip coffee pot (that I've had for decades), a dual electric drip coffee maker/espresso machine, a second electric drip coffee maker, and a Tassimo coffee maker.

That doesn't include a couple of coffee makers in our second house. 

And I've only really been a coffee drinker for the last 15 years or so.... 

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THAT is the one that I want!  I don't own one because they're sixty bucks....  haha!

 

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Breakfast Diva wrote:

Joey Bloggs wrote:

camberleyhotelharrogate@yahoo.co.uk wrote:

french presses's seem hard to get in the USA - here in the UK they sell them everywhere ie all the super markets all over!

They are sold everywhere here.

I am not a fan because the coffee goes cold too quickly. I use the personal size for a one cup if at a coffee house. I am a fan when we camp, they are a great way to get a good cup of coffee. Boiling the kettle on the fire.

We have 2 of these Bodum stainless steel thermal French presses for our guests. Since we're in the land of really strong coffee (Pacific Northwest), we serve those guests who want really strong coffee with this FP. Since it's thermal, it keeps the heat and because it's stainless steel, the guests can't break it! They're expensive though. We paid $60 each several years ago. It's an 8 cup model and they do make smaller ones.  I really prefer FP over drip.

.

I remember you posted those before. Esp important if you deliver breakfast to their door. I love those!

Hillbilly's picture
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Thanks for all the great ideas!! This was a big help!

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Do you have a local roaster?  Or do you have someone within a reasonable distance that is known locally for their coffee? 

We have a local coffee house that roasts their own coffee.  They will do a roast to your taste.  (They serve a variety of coffees every day - current new one is The Blend of the World, a word play...haha, including a really high caffeine variety).  I would go with them if I was still in business.   I used to use whole bean free trade coffee bought from different sources, fresh ground and brewed every day.  I did keep some of that Dunkin Donuts coffee for the folks that liked a wimpier brew. Eye-wink

Our new bakery buys their coffee from a place in our State that only uses free trade coffee in their roaster.  That is their sales pitch. 

I think that if you provide high quality coffee, your guests will usually notice the difference.  Unless, they're used to the mini market burnt stuff. 

And, if you want, you could add it as a retail item for folks to take home with them. 

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i only buy fair trade coffee, i would suggest you look into that.

a coffee tasting is a great idea, ask your guests for coffee favorites, turn it into a promotion, a facebook contest ....  it's all good.

whatever kind of coffee i brew, if i grind the beans myself, it makes a HUGE difference. 

if you could hook up with a local roaster, that would be awesome.

i am one of those who has a little coffee with my light and sweet ... but i have friends/family/guests who are serious coffee drinkers. 

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Community Coffee. Louisiana coffee, can be ordered from them on line. Offers free shipping most of the rime.

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Is there a local roaster where you live?

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Thanks for all your help! Coffee is a funny drink. It's very true about where your from. It's not like "where do you buy your Coke products from"? We are using a company called Standard now. I'm not getting the results I want. I think it's the same coffee Sonic uses. So JB you are correct. This is not what we should be serving. It's not bad. Just not great. I do have a really nice brewer. I would also like to get into specialty coffees and cappachinos. I think thi would be a nice addition. But the equipment is so much.

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There is NOTHING other than Coca Cola products where I live, Bob.  Nothing...it would be bad form to serve anything else.  Haha!

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Bob wrote:
Thanks for all your help! Coffee is a funny drink.

You got THAT right! I've only had about 10 cups of coffee in my life that really "wowed" me (talking about plain coffee, with no flavoring added). In every case but one, it was at a hotel or "plain food" restaurant that used a commercial Bunn coffee maker. The lone exception was from an old fashioned percolator.

Other than those 10 cups, all the rest I've ever had was just coffee. Just average. I've never had any I'd really call bad. And I've had plenty of cups from the same Bunn machines that did NOT wow me. So I just don't know. Don't know if it was because of the weather that day, or what I had eaten earlier in the day or what.

I currently buy Eight O'Clock beans, grind them, and brew them in a drip coffee maker that was the top Consumer Reports pick because it gets the water to the ideal temperature (they say most machines don't). And the result: just coffee, nothing special.

Come to think of it, I haven't had a cup of wow in several years now. I'm fearing I've worn out my taste buds (really sense of smell)!

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Arkansawyer wrote:

I currently buy Eight O'Clock beans, grind them, and brew them in a drip coffee maker that was the top Consumer Reports pick because it gets the water to the ideal temperature (they say most machines don't). And the result: just coffee, nothing special.

That's what we were using until we switched to a local roaster. We got really good compliments on the Eight O'Clock. Better compliments on the local roaster, tho. Bunn machine, filtered water. Water has a LOT to do with how the coffee tastes. We've sent a lot of guests to the grocery store to buy the blend we get. That tells me they really did like it and weren't just being nice.

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Irony: With 18 to 20 choices of countries, I find it amazing how many say - Columbian. BORRRRR-Rrinngggg! Ehtiopia, Sumatra, Kenya are among the stronger varieties for those who like the Five Buck coffee.

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We buy the cash & carry's own brand and we get many positive comments about it. I like a decent cup of coffee and I wouldn't give guests anything less.

So as JB says, maybe it's not so much what you buy as what you do with it. 

it's  Colombian and "Fair Trade" 

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we are a bit spoilt here as the Head Quarters for Bettys & Taylors coffee is here and we get it direct from the factory with free delivery over £50 if you are local (fair trade and rainforest alliance and if you send in the tokens on the packs for every 4 they plant a tree) as we also get our room tea bags from them (yorkshire tea) and breakfast tea bags (and are 12 rooms) it isn't difficult to spend enough to get it free delivery! They are also now behind all the special coffee in Asda so its a good way to buy it anywhere.

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Bob you have such high occupancy you could turn this into a contest with your guests. Have some fun with it.

Hillbilly's picture
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Not a bad idea! This could be a way to bring some people in during the slow season. Advertise a coffee roast extravaganza weekend. Come try coffees from all over the world. Then ask what their fav was.

gillumhouse's picture
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Another way I use it is as donations instead of room nights. I have been told my basket of 4 roasts from around the world are sought after at the Silent Auction at the Tourism Conference.

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Java Estate Roasters in NC is a good one- the inn where I worked have used them for YEARS.

In the 5 years I worked there, we never had a bad batch of beans or a bad cup of coffee...

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Bob I guess the real question is how do you make, and serve your coffee?

There are different qualities of beans and roasting that make a good coffee.

My quote is "Just say no to service station coffee!" that is what you find at most hotels. Bitter back of the throat, heartburn in the shoulder, high in acid, low in flavor, poor quality beans.  I will add if you sugar it up and cream it to the max, then you really don't care for the flavor of coffee. Like latte's, (cafe latte's) which translate to "milk coffee" in Italian, is hot milk with some coffee thrown in! haha

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Yes, we found when we traveled to Italy and France recently, that the cups of coffee probably don't exceed 4 ounces! A 16 ounce cup of coffee is unheard of! It is somewhat common to mix hot milk with coffee, I believe equal parts.

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This is my roaster

http://www.burmancoffee.com/equipment/NescoPro.html

In order of preference of vendor for beans"

http://www.burmancoffee.com/coffeelist/#origin

http://www.u-roast-em.com/coffee-beans.html

I enjoy the different countries and so do guests

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gillumhouse wrote:

This is my roaster

http://www.burmancoffee.com/equipment/NescoPro.html

In order of preference of vendor for beans"

http://www.burmancoffee.com/coffeelist/#origin

http://www.u-roast-em.com/coffee-beans.html

I enjoy the different countries and so do guests

WOW! That a lot to choose from. Do you have some favs? Any you do not recommended?

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I am sorry, I just realized you asked about favorites. I like the milder coffees. Panama, Costa Rica, Bolivia, Peru, the Hawaiians - there are a lot of really nice ones. I do not use any of the peaberry varieties - that is how I roasted roaster #1, a bean got stuck under the auger and the rest is toast! I now have 2 roasters and it will be nice next season when I have requests for a couple countries. I like to wait at least 30 minutes between roasts. 1 roast makes a 24-cup pot. I usually just make the 10-12 cup pots so get 2 pots per roast. (I have 4 regular pots and 1 24-cup in case I have some coffee hounds in-house.)

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What constitutes a great cup of coffee has a lot to do with what region of country you're in and what you're used to.   You might want to keep that in mind, especially if your customer base generally comes from a specific area. 

For example, when we travel in New England, there's literally a Dunkin Donuts on every corner and that lighter, smoother style of coffee is extremely popular. On the west cost, stronger and more bitter coffees like Peets are more popular.   

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