Breakfast Costs

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If you added up the coffee, oj, and food from breakfast for one person, what would the approx cost be? 

Obv the more guests the less the cost overall from the products we include. So for an average breakfast, say you have a FULL HOUSE (whatever is full at your inn). What is the cost?

Do you have the cost for a lower priced and higher priced breakfast? In season, and out?

These are numbers we should know. I am upping the $ for taxes from 2012. As the cost of living goes up, so does our breakfast cost. I have kept it the same for 4 years now.  Some items have doubled in cost. 

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04/21/2010

7.25/room so that is a couple. We tried to make some cuts to the number once we saw what it was but I think those just kept us even. Like was mentioned above, this is one of the fun parts of the business so it is a harder spot to make cuts.

We did plant strawberries, raspberries and a plum tree with the hopes that we could offset some of the fruit costs and add a fun aspect at certain times of the year. After doing the grape harvest at the local winery, I want to add grape vines this summer. "These are the actual grapes the winery uses in their whatever wine." I had not realized how sweet wine grapes were. Now how big of a pain these are going ot be to maintain versus just buy at the store is another question.

OnTheShore's picture
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Here's one source: volcanic deodorizer

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Oh, that's what that stuff is? I have a number of those bags around my house. Never realized what they really were. Just supposed to check odors around the house, not in the fridge.

Generic's picture
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They work in the fridge, but since they capture the odours that make fruit continue to ripen, it slows the process. Laughing out loud

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Hillbilly's picture
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Eric Arthur Blair wrote:

They work in the fridge, but since they capture the odours that make fruit continue to ripen, it slows the process. Laughing out loud

The coffee supplier we just had come by the other day said the best odor eater in a fridge is coffee beans. He also did not recommend brewing it after words. You will drink a cup of coffee that tastes like a fridge.

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Generic's picture
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Actually, he's wrong. Besides zeolite, the next best thing is activated charcoal. It's a natural odour absorber, but if it reaches saturation, it gives off odours instead. Of course it absorbs ALL odours, including the good ones. 

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I would love to see exact numbers for an exact breakfast, it would be really cool. I know there are no two days alike, with food or guests, so that is not easy to do. I am going to do it on a 'standard drill' breakfast and see what i come up with.

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05/30/2008

This is something that I never tried to de-construct - which was probably a bad business practice.  But, creating beautiful breakfasts was the joyful part of innkeeping for me.  Smiling  

I tried to stick with seasonal fresh fruits and buy what was "on sale" for the fruit component.  In the Winter, baked pears were a big hit and different kinds of crisps.  February was a great month to do cherry crisps from canned fruit.  While I personally preferred using fresh fruit, those were always a big hit.  Like dessert for breakfast!

I'd also really stock up on the things that we used all the time when they were on sale, like thick sliced bacon, high quality sausage, or real maple syrup. 

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Breakfast Diva's picture
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In the winter I use a lot of apples and pears. I'll buy whatever apple is cheapest (not delicious variety). 1 apple or 1 pear will make 2 servings.

Cut fruit in half and peel the pear (I don't peel the apple). With a melon baller, scoop out the core. With the apple, I'll fill the hole with a little canned cranberry sauce, but you don't have to. Top with crisp topping (I use a lot of topping).

Spray baking dish with Pam, put in fruit and add any kind of juice to the bottom of the pan, so it can steam a little while cooking. Cover with foil and bake at 365 for 20 minutes then remove foil. Bake until top is crisp, about 20-30 minutes. Cooking time varies a lot with the type of fruit and variety of fruit. If it's breakfast time and the fruit is not cooked all the way don't panic. Just microwave for about 1 minute and it should cook enough.

In the winter, I'll use an oval ramekin to bake for 1 room and instead of heating the big oven, it works well in a toaster oven.

My crisp topping:

1/2 cup flour

1/2 cup oats

6 Tbl butter (cut in pieces)

3/4 cup brown sugar

1/2 tsp nutmeg (or cinnamon)

I make a double batch, stick it in a ziplock bag and store it in the fridge. It lasts forever. Just throw all the ingredients into a food processor and blend until the butter chunks are pea size.

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½ Cup Oats

6 Tbl butter (cut in small pieces)

3/4 Cup Brown Sugar

½ tsp. Ground Nutmeg

½ tsp. Salt

 Sometimes I'll plate it on top of a glob of yogurt and use some of the left over juices, but it's great plain also.

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On this same token, I would like to share that Pineapple has been a good bang for the buck this year, as it was last year. It keeps better than melon, and if served au natural, in the rough, then it goes further (vs cutting it up and serving diced).

I can also buy one or two and have them ripening on hold until I need them.

Star fruit are in right now, but don't really have guests! Dang it. Those are also good bang for the buck if I can get them, and slice them thin.

Has anyone had something work out really well this past year they would like to share with us? We are all ears. devil

Madeleine's picture
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09/29/2011

The panna cotta. 16 servings from one quart of milk/cream/half and half/whatever you like. 30 cents/serving. (Includes gelatin.)

I top it with the berries I froze from a different day. Cook them up with a little sugar, vanilla and lemon. Maybe raises the price to 40 cents/serving.

The chocolate version costs a lot more. Only do that one when we have little kids in the house.

I really should just break down and start making muffins again. What's a muffin gonna cost to make? 20 cents?

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Madeleine's picture
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09/29/2011

If I tried to figure it out...

  • 30 cents/egg, 2.5 eggs per serving= 75 cents for the eggs
  • 30 cents/slice of bread for toast= 30 cents
  • 75 cents for the sausages
  • 30 cents/cup of coffee= 90 cents for coffee (add in another 50 cents for the creamer and sugars)
  • 50 cents/glass of oj= $1 for juice
  • $1 for the fruit
  • 33 cents for the yogurt to go with the fruit
  • 15 cents for the granola
  • 15 cents for the jam and butter for the toast
  • all of the 'materials' for cooking, seasoning and the like, another 25 cents.

That's $6.08 for one serving. Give or take. And that's with a full house. If you consider days when we have ONE guest, the entire meal is whatever it costs us to buy the food. Maybe $15. Generally speaking, DH spends $60/day buying breakfast foods in the summer. That's the fresh stuff. The frozen stuff we have on hand. Ditto the mixes for batters.

Madeleine's picture
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09/29/2011

We try to average $7/room for breakfast. But...fruit is not cheap here. We are going to have to go to more 'filler' and less fruit but we still have to buy a whole 'whatever size' pack of fruit. And most of it goes bad before we can get a second breakfast out of it unless I freeze it and use it for 'sauce' at another time. (Raspberries in particular go bad the next day after purchase.)

On days when we have pancakes the price is a lot lower than on days when we have french toast with fruit topping. So, average is about $7/room or $3.50/person. It does hit $5/person more often than I like.

We should have these numbers but we don't. All I have is an average for the year. Not by the meal. 

Generic's picture
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02/24/2011

Maddy if you want to try something very different, get some absorbent zeolite and put it in a small linen bag with your berries. It absorbs the gasses that make it ripen too quickly and gives you a few extra days, especially with berries. (It will eventually not absorb as well, you then put it out in the sun for the day and it "Revives" itself, usually every 3 to 4 months. Usually good for a year or so.) When it's expired, don't throw it out, it can be used instead of gravel/salt for traction on icy surfaces. Oh and you don't need baking soda in the fridge when using it.

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05/30/2008

Eric,

Where do I get this, (zeolite) hardware store, pharmacy or...?

With berries at about $5/pint now with the California freezes, this is good to know. I have successfully kept bananas from Aldi's in the plastic bag, in the refrigerator for well over a week! The skins look horrible, but the fruit is fresh.

Generic's picture
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02/24/2011

It's available mostly by mail order. Look up Zeolite and odour or odor and you will find places. The one I use is http://www.fresh-n.com but I'm not sure if they ship to the US. You can find other sources, though. 

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05/22/2008

I have never heard of this before either. Is it approved and safe for use with foods?  I think this stuff is in cat litter???  Here's a link. Did a Google search and found no references to use it with food, but it is used with aquariums,  and I did find a health food place touting it 

Generic's picture
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02/24/2011

You don't put it touching food, you put it in a fabric pouch so that it can absorb the off gassing. The one I use is http://www.fresh-n.com

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05/22/2008

We use those "green bags"  and they keep fruit very well.

Madeleine's picture
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09/29/2011

Thanks!

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