What’s the point of traveling?

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Food for thought

What’s the point of traveling?

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Don't get me started on them, they shouldn't have them in the USA they are ridiculous. Man I used to fly through them, change lanes roll on out...Love roundabouts, but not here, oh no not here, they are absurd here, people cannot use them.

Many people cannot merge onto a highway or interstate either, they stop.

Now Jersey, you people can drive! I love driving up there, it is like a race course, no one slows down, you go around no matter what. I love it.

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My first experience with roundabouts was in Illinois. There are 2 in the burbs of Chicago - I hated them. 2-lanes going round and round ar max speed and if in the inside lane lots of luck getting out!! The just put in an new exit and road into downtown Fairmont. It has 3 roundabouts and so far is working OK. They go 70 - 80 + mph on the Interstate but drive like normal people in town so the people have adapted to it quickly.

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There's a big push around here for roundabouts. There are a couple between here and VT and they are so much better than the stop lights. Yes, they take practice if you've never seen one. But, the latest research says they're much better for older drivers because the traffic is steady and not doing 80 MPH trying to beat the light. And, because everyone keeps moving, they save on fuel.

As long as the signage is clear, I like them. Not the ones near Boston where they only have the wee tiny street signs that you can't read until you've driven past them. At least you can go around again...

The ones here are only 2 lanes.

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Believe it or not, we now have 3 roundabouts here!  They are in the goofiest locations.  It's kind of funny to see how people navigate them.  Smiling

I guess I was kind of used to them too where I learned to drive...only in DC they are called "circles".  Eye-wink

The only city that kind of made me cringe when we were in a rental car was Boston.  They made lanes of cars where there were no lanes!!

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I recommend using this theme for one of the 101 or 100 things to see and do in your area. If you have a unique culture, watermen for example: click here. Or a specific dialect, or food only found or mostly found, or originating there. 

As you know we have so many one nighters here, arrive late, leave early and miss the whole enchilada. It is a pet peeve of mine, they don't care, I guess, to go outside of themselves and learn about other people and cultures. So I wrote about that (not in a pet peevish way, of course, but an innvite to them).

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Having been raised in MD, I will never forget the first time I met a waterman! 

We took a long weekend trip to Charleston, SC and wanted to try and experience some of the Gullah culture.  We did find a great locally owned restaurant that had fantastic food and the most beautiful art work on the walls. 

Finding out what has woven the fabric of a place through the people is really the most interesting part of travel to me....

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Joey Bloggs wrote:

I recommend using this theme for one of the 101 or 100 things to see and do in your area. If you have a unique culture, watermen for example: click here. Or a specific dialect, or food only found or mostly found, or originating there. 

As you know we have so many one nighters here, arrive late, leave early and miss the whole enchilada. It is a pet peeve of mine, they don't care, I guess, to go outside of themselves and learn about other people and cultures. So I wrote about that (not in a pet peevish way, of course, but an innvite to them).

On my list for sure!!  I find some people are just plain scared to try anything new, especially food.  I cannot say how many times one of them seems all into finding out about this restaurant or that, and the other looks like I am talking Latin.  Or they go to the big city, thinking they will find what they are looking for on the main streets, no you gotta get IN there to find that.... they depart unhappy with the whole trip all because they THOUGHT they knew where they were going. 

THIS is why we are here - love my area, love to share it with the world; just ask!!! (or read my blog or website!) 

 

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copperhead wrote:

Joey Bloggs wrote:

I recommend using this theme for one of the 101 or 100 things to see and do in your area. If you have a unique culture, watermen for example: click here. Or a specific dialect, or food only found or mostly found, or originating there. 

As you know we have so many one nighters here, arrive late, leave early and miss the whole enchilada. It is a pet peeve of mine, they don't care, I guess, to go outside of themselves and learn about other people and cultures. So I wrote about that (not in a pet peevish way, of course, but an innvite to them).

On my list for sure!!  I find some people are just plain scared to try anything new, especially food.  I cannot say how many times one of them seems all into finding out about this restaurant or that, and the other looks like I am talking Latin.  Or they go to the big city, thinking they will find what they are looking for on the main streets, no you gotta get IN there to find that.... they depart unhappy with the whole trip all because they THOUGHT they knew where they were going. 

THIS is why we are here - love my area, love to share it with the world; just ask!!! (or read my blog or website!) 

 

ONE more thing to note.  If you do blog about a restaurant, go to Urbanspoon.com and register, you can link your blog post to the site and gain extra exposure.  Urbanspoon has provided lots of hits to my blog.  (this is new to me as I never check blog stats)  Now I will do lots more & look for other ways to expand my exposure.

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no you gotta get IN there to find that

One of the days my brother & I were in Paris, we took the day to take the Metro to go along the Seine (the tour was going to Versailles for extra euros). the lines to the small museum and the small chapel we were told were nice were just too long so we just went walking. We walked back to Notre Dame and then decided to see what was in the next block. Just one block away from Notre Dame, the prices of a bottle of water or coke and the prices in the shops were half of what it was on the main drag! It was just nice to walk along the streets - the produce displays, the small sandwich shops, etc and watching the people!!!

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Yes, I agree. Hubby and I were just in Europe. We walked to our destination, about a mile or two away. There was a little hole in the wall bar, but they offered breakfast!! Imagine that! We ordered and hubby asked about bread and butter. Even though they displayed sandwiches in their display window, the woman said it would be just about 10 minutes and she went down the street to buy bread for my husband! Talk about service and graciousness!

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One of the reasons why I'm usually against being dragged around in a tour bus with a large group of the same demographic (Americans, seniors, etc.) My dh and I had the best time last year when we rented scooters to tour around an historic Southern city on our own.  We could park easily, stop when we wanted, and zip around quicker than riding a bicycle or walking.  We had folks in tour buses listening to the canned speech look out on us as we could easily read the historic markers up close and personal and take great photos.  Smiling 

However, when we did our Med cruise last year, we had the best time on our shore excursions because the groups were smaller, the people on the tours were from all over the globe, and we picked adventures where for the most part we met the locals.  

You'll pay more for just about everything around the tourist sites in any big city, unfortunately.  There are just some things not to be missed though!  Depending on if we move this year and some other things (like $$$), I really want to get my dh to Paris and France (he has never been there). 

I really feel enriched by the travel that I've been able to do and the places where I've been fortunate to live and all the people that I've met.  Seems like that is the main point of the article.  I still have a looooooooooong travel bucket list....

 

 

 

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I love to travel. I just resented the statement that people who do not travel are stupid.

One thing that make me want to hit whomever does these rankings on areas a slap up the side of the head is the way they give West Virginia a black mark for "lack of diversity". Uhm, what are we supposed to do? Hogtie people and tell them they MUST live here? In the big cities with their "diverse" populations, you will find pockets of ethnicity. Likes want to like near likes. A lot of my State is hard-scrabble living. In the best of times we do not have a lot of "diverse" employment. Money is found for food and shelter and there is not a lot left for travel. Cable lets them travel the world. They are NOT stupid - just content with their lot in life because we get to live in a place of wonderful beauty and near the really important thing here - family. I have never lived anywhere that displayed the pride of place as here. The Flying WV or the name of our State is on vehicles, clothes, jackets, hats. or flags flown in front of houses. Never saw that in Illinois or Ohio.

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I would say a very poor choice of words for that author...  But I understand the point of the article.  One of my nieces went to Paris on her honeymoon.  She was raised on the West coast of Florida and had never been to a big urban city even here in the U.S.  All she noticed about Paris was that the city was noisy, busy, and there were lots of people who all spoke French.  dur.  She didn't embrace the architecture, the history, and aspects of their culture.  I felt sad for her that she couldn't see it. 

I recently talked to someone here who had the good fortune to do a big trip to Asia.  They complained that they got tired of the food.  Again, dur.  I think maybe that's the kind of thing that the author is addressing.  Meanwhile, having lived all over here in the U.S. and also abroad, I'm tired of the fact that it's a challenge to get anything but this regional food when eating out here.  Good thing that I like to cook at home!  Eye-wink

I lived in Texas for 8 years and there is a State with BIG pride of place (it's a BIG State, too!)  Smiling

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Part of the point was that when all you have ever seen is what you've always ever seen anything different is taken as alien and 'bad'.

I moved 300 miles from where I was born and I might as well have moved to the moon. The answer to 'Where are you from?'  was greeted with a sneer and the end of the conversation. Those same folks thought going to a city 10 miles away that had a non-college population of about 25,000 people JUST LIKE THEMSELVES was dangerous. They were amazed I would let my kids take the bus even. Not big travelers, the farthest most of them did travel was to go to work. It was a very insular community. Not accepting of differences of any kind. As a single parent with a really good job I was looked on as a freak. After years of this I told one bubba who asked me out that I didn't want to dilute the gene pool, so no thanks. (So, I dated guys who were born in the same state I was and who had also moved for the job.)

And I am not a big traveler. But I was brought up in a big city where insularity has its limits. You can have your '____town' but it abuts someone else's '_____town' so you at least know there are other kinds of people. And, even if you don't want to associate with them on a personal level you're probably gonna have to work with them.

 

 

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I find it helps to go with someone who knows the area (which is why B&B's are so crucial). Even tho my biggies were to see the gargoyles up close (I did) and to see the Mona Lisa (no one else in the room at the time) going there with someone who knew exactly where everything was made the trip a lot more pleasant. I even got to see the Lady and the Unicorn tapestries.

That's why staying at a B&B is important if you're coming into an area cold. You can have a list (which I did) but having someone be able to say, 'Go at this time, not that,' or, 'You'll pass this along the way, stop there to eat,' or, 'The last Metro runs at 11 PM, don't miss it, it's a long walk back!' are really important things to know!

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I agree! We loved walking off the beaten path in Venice. I enjoyed the evenings especially...no cars, no sounds except those from the open windows of Venetians going about their lives. Fun eavesdropping Smiling  Would love to go back to Italy, but the major thing stopping me is the mess at the airports, and flying for 8-10 hours. But maybe one day, I will reconsider it.

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Did you DRIVE? That was what drove me CRAZY! Folks on the "interstate" flashing lights at you, honking, just because you are not going 160KM like they are! Had bad driving weather, lots of rain, etc. The bicyclists and folks on scooters just whizzed past you. What if you were going to make a turn? They could have been creamed! Then everybody changes lanes in the middle of the intersection! We were in Venice, too. The GPS lady wanted us to turn into the canal to get to our room. We kidded she'd been nipping a bit between cities. Nothing was easy to find. I really wanted to take a train, but hubby insisted on driving. Once in the big cities, we parked and walked pretty much everywhere we went.

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I took a trip to France about 10 years ago and ended up being the driver.  That was interesting because I wasn't prepared for it!  We thought someone else was going to drive and she chickened out.  haha.  If we'd had a smaller car, I think it would have been easier when we were in the towns on some of the really narrow streets.  Smiling

My dh does pretty well in the UK despite driving on the "other side" of the road.  He's pretty amazing with how he can navigate the roundabouts.  On our last trip there, we had a little Peugeot with a stick shift.  We took a trip up through the North York Moors and everyone in their BMWs or other cars with bigger engines were blinking their lights and passing us.  haha.  We just looked out the windows and shrugged at them.  Eye-wink

I learned to drive on the DC beltway....takes a lot to scare me.  Laughing out loud

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Oh, roundabouts in France/Italy are SWEET! At least folks who are entering give those already on the roundabout the right of way! (I never could figure out the traffic flow WITHIN a roundabout...)

Another thing I was unprepared for was merging onto the "interstate." Here the approaches/onramps are MUCH longer! Even on a short one, if you stop...you just DON'T! I learned one way of merging here in the U.S.... you just GO! NEVER stop! Just the opposite in Europe. You stop/slow down  until it is safe to merge. We had a Honda. Not as good a turning radius as I'm used to with my car, but better than some.

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Our area has found out just how great roundabouts are and have been placing them in otherwise congested areas and have eased the problem... that is once people found out how they work.  It's yield not stop - angry

We took public transit when in Europe and I learned long ago not to watch how they drive - better for my heart to not know what's coming!  After reading this thread, if any of you plan to drive in Europe and want to practice driving on short on-ramps, go to Houston and drive I-10, while most things are BIG in TX, ramps there didn't get the word.  Scarysurprise

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A lot of states have even removed the Yield signs from the entry ramps. I can tell you that here half the drivers do yield to traffic doing 80 on the interstate and half just pull right out in front of them, while doing 40. We had one spot here where 2 entry ramps were within 100 yds of each other and one of them had a ramp that was about 3 feet long. You came around a corner where there was a granite cliff blocking your sight line and then you were in traffic. Even after using that ramp many times I was still surprised by how short the lane was.

It was finally extended quite a distance and it has made that section of highway much better.

I don't just pull out because I don't want to die just trying to get on the highway. There is not always room for drivers to change lanes and a lot of them think they own the lane they're in anyway. Too much rage behind the wheel. And, yes, I have been cut off by drivers with more aggressive habits who just pull out anyway.

(I have a friend who doesn't even look. She is the only car on the road and everyone else had better understand that.)

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Yes, if you stop on an entrance ramp here in the States, you'll get run over!  (Unless they have controlled access with the stop lights.)  Drivers in the Atlanta metro area never seem to signal either.  

Driving in France, I was never sure of the speed limit in a lot of places.  Ack!  It didn't seem to be posted as much as here, so I just kept up with the rest of the traffic.  Eye-wink

I've used trains and public transport quite a bit in Europe and the UK because it's so accessible and affordable. 

 

 

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I drove in Ireland. A little disconcerting when people are passing on both sides and from opposite directions. Everyone just moves over. A 2-lane road goes to 4-5 lanes depending on who is passing where. Of course, then there are the 'lanes' where 2 cars don't fit so someone has to drive up the side of the hill.

Everyone was very nice to us. Apparently, unlike here, they see the 'rental' car plates and give you some leeway. France was a whole other ball of wax! I walked or took the Metro there. Loved how everyone just pulled up on the sidewalk to park. I think as long as one tire was in the road, it was ok.

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Did they have Smart Cars then? They park with their nose in the street. back to the curb! Not unusual for cars to double park, at least for a bit. A new meaning for "Smart Cars."

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I read that they are removing the machines that gave us our mammogram, mri, and cat scan all in one from the airports.

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Yes I heard that on the news. Good grief...more money down the drain and more being spent on the replacements..

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copperhead wrote:

THIS is why we are here - love my area, love to share it with the world; just ask!!! (or read my blog or website!) 

 

Just had a review that said just that about us.

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CH I was thinking about you when I made those comments, as you have a unique culture. I would love to find out more about it when I visit. So that is a great theme!

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Joey Bloggs wrote:

CH I was thinking about you when I made those comments, as you have a unique culture. I would love to find out more about it when I visit. So that is a great theme!

Can't wait for you to visit JB!   So many themes here, wish I had the time to list them all.  But I have it in my mind to as many as possible.  Thanks for the match!

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Joey Bloggs wrote:

CH I was thinking about you when I made those comments, as you have a unique culture. I would love to find out more about it when I visit. So that is a great theme!

Should we ever go there it would be to find the other half of DH's family. They were split up- half the family (and I mean individual families) were separated and sent, some to desolate parts of NB and some to the bayou. We tell that history to guests and they are astonished that some of the family names you find in the bayous are from Canada. They think they're all there from Napoleon.

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Madeleine wrote:

Joey Bloggs wrote:

CH I was thinking about you when I made those comments, as you have a unique culture. I would love to find out more about it when I visit. So that is a great theme!

Should we ever go there it would be to find the other half of DH's family. They were split up- half the family (and I mean individual families) were separated and sent, some to desolate parts of NB and some to the bayou. We tell that history to guests and they are astonished that some of the family names you find in the bayous are from Canada. They think they're all there from Napoleon.

You are right, so many really do not know where that group of people came from.  Watched a documentary recently on PBS and it told the history in detail.  Very entertaining as well as accurate.  The name is "Against the Tide: The Story of the Acadian People"  and LPB documentary. 

I am sure some of your DH's family are doing the same here, trying to reconnect the link to their ancestors.  Hope you are able to make the trip at some point.

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Madeleine wrote:

Joey Bloggs wrote:

CH I was thinking about you when I made those comments, as you have a unique culture. I would love to find out more about it when I visit. So that is a great theme!

Should we ever go there it would be to find the other half of DH's family. They were split up- half the family (and I mean individual families) were separated and sent, some to desolate parts of NB and some to the bayou. We tell that history to guests and they are astonished that some of the family names you find in the bayous are from Canada. They think they're all there from Napoleon.

Same here with my husband's family. MOST got sent north, but the lucky (or unlucky, depending upon you you look at it) were sent the to Northernland....

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Penelope wrote:

Madeleine wrote:

Joey Bloggs wrote:

CH I was thinking about you when I made those comments, as you have a unique culture. I would love to find out more about it when I visit. So that is a great theme!

Should we ever go there it would be to find the other half of DH's family. They were split up- half the family (and I mean individual families) were separated and sent, some to desolate parts of NB and some to the bayou. We tell that history to guests and they are astonished that some of the family names you find in the bayous are from Canada. They think they're all there from Napoleon.

Same here with my husband's family. MOST got sent north, but the lucky (or unlucky, depending upon you you look at it) were sent the to Northernland....

We're off to visit the motherland...but not while it's 30 below! I'll wait until it warms up a bit. At least 0.

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Yes, to point out what there is to see and do is grewat. I always did research to find out what there was - I hated to get home and find out we were just 10 miles from __________! It was reading the article that made me want to slap the writer. I love travel and want others to see what we have here (and stay here a few days while they do it).

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I come from parents who both had "sand in their shoes" and we traveled. I took my kids all over the USA. Of the six, 1 is a world traveler (my one trip to the delivery room inherited the sand gene), 1 travels a lot, 1 has traveled some, and of the others, one does a lot of fishing and camping sometimes into Canada, and the last 2 not so much other than to visit The Ps (here). My City Manager has traveled as far as Chicago (a Conference) and Wisconsin (moving a son) but I would call any of them stupid. Living in the Chicago area and going to museums exposed my family to diversity. Reading exposed others. I wish I had the intelligence of my City Manager.

I agree travel allows one to see, do, experience but I do not agree that it is a necessity. Travel is/can be expensive. I had the travel gene so bad, it was the one thing I was willing to take out a loan to do (and we did it on the cheap). Growing up, our travel was mostly going to Chicago for a week (I grew up in WV) to visit my aunt, go to the museums, the zoo, the lakefront = free things. BOOKS were purchased to open our world to the world, cultures, and history. This article puts down anyone who does not have the wanderlust (or wherewithal) for travel. I do not like to put anyone down who does not have the same opinions and high intelligence of myself (yeah, right) because I often find I can learn a lot from others, including compassion.

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Absolutely.

I usually say that about guests who show up wanting exactly what they could get back home in (insert state here)- what's the point of traveling (if all you want is what you have at home)?

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