Service pets -

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06/24/2008

Just saw this on a national chain's website 'ADA certified service animals welcome'   Anyone know if they are now doing certifications? 

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04/21/2010

It would save everyone a lot of time and hassle if they were certified. Seems like a small thing. But leaving it up to a word of mouth thing seems a bit messy.

gillumhouse's picture
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05/22/2008

I will bend over and grab my ankles for people who are genuinely in need or are nice about their requests BUT I despise people who push BECAUSE THEY CAN! The ones who SAY they have a service animal simply because they know we are stuck when they know and we know (and they know we know) it is just a way to get what they want and we be damned! Selfish people that make life difficult for everyone - especially for those who are genuine.

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07/23/2008

My dog is a "therapy dog" and used in therapeutic settings. When we moved here (a different state) she was considered a 'service' dog and was allowed to fly on the air plane right at my feet.

Even tho she had certifications on paper, she had to pass a couple 'visible' tests and the airlines made it clear that whether she would be allowed to ride on the plane was completely dependent on how she behaved at the airport. 

I would think a B&B would be able to do the same. I have never had a service dog show up here, but If someone asked to bring their service animal, I'd ask what their disability is, because I don't have a ADA room. Being historic and over 100 yrs old, in my state, I don't have to. 

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Sunshine

 

seashanty's picture
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06/02/2008

When it is not obvious what service an animal provides, only limited inquiries are allowed.

Staff may ask two questions: (1) is the dog a service animal required because of a disability, and (2) what work or task has the dog been trained to perform.

Staff cannot ask about the person’s disability, require medical documentation, require a special identification card or training documentation for the dog, or ask that the dog demonstrate its ability to perform the work or task.

from the ada.gov website

 

 

Sunshine wrote:

My dog is a "therapy dog" and used in therapeutic settings. When we moved here (a different state) she was considered a 'service' dog and was allowed to fly on the air plane right at my feet.

Even tho she had certifications on paper, she had to pass a couple 'visible' tests and the airlines made it clear that whether she would be allowed to ride on the plane was completely dependent on how she behaved at the airport. 

I would think a B&B would be able to do the same. I have never had a service dog show up here, but If someone asked to bring their service animal, I'd ask what their disability is, because I don't have a ADA room. Being historic and over 100 yrs old, in my state, I don't have to. 

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06/24/2008

Sunshine wrote:

 I don't have a ADA room. Being historic and over 100 yrs old, in my state, I don't have to. 

We were also told we do not have to meet ADA standards as we are 5 rooms. 

Kay Nein's picture
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02/13/2012

Thanks for that link, Harborfields!  Good information.

Particular points of interest:

  • A service animal is not a pet. The ADA requires you to modify your "no pets" policy to allow the use of a service animal by a person with a disability.
  • Some, but not all, are licensed or certified and have identification papers. You may ask the person who has the animal if it is a service animal required because of a disability. However, an individual who is going to a restaurant or theater is not likely to be carrying documentation of the disability. Documentation generally may not be required as a condition for providing service to an individual accompanied by a service animal. You may not insist on proof of state certification before permitting the service animal to accompany the person with a disability
  • You may exclude any animal, including a service animal, from your facility when that animal's behavior poses a direct threat to the health or safety of others. For example, any service animal that displays vicious behavior towards other guests or customers may be excluded. You may not make assumptions, however, about how a particular animal is likely to behave based on your past experience with other animals.

Let me ask this question - if you have a particular room(s) that are pet friendly, would you allow someone with a "service animal" to stay in a room that was not pet friendly?  

There is a cabin rental company here who got into a major fuss with a guest.  He clearly stated that his service animal was not a "pet" (which it says in this document).  The cabin he wanted to rent was not pet-friendly at the request of the cabin owner and also as a way to offer that cabin to people who might have pet allergies.  His argument was that his animal was not a pet and under ADA he should be allowed to rent any cabin he wanted. 

What's your opinion on that one?

Madeleine's picture
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09/29/2011

K9 wrote:

Let me ask this question - if you have a particular room(s) that are pet friendly, would you allow someone with a "service animal" to stay in a room that was not pet friendly?  

There is a cabin rental company here who got into a major fuss with a guest.  He clearly stated that his service animal was not a "pet" (which it says in this document).  The cabin he wanted to rent was not pet-friendly at the request of the cabin owner and also as a way to offer that cabin to people who might have pet allergies.  His argument was that his animal was not a pet and under ADA he should be allowed to rent any cabin he wanted. 

What's your opinion on that one?

It's really too bad that the guest HAD a place to stay but had to push to get something that was clearly off limits. We had a pet-friendly room but I know we're required to take the service animal in any room, no charge. It means a hell of a lot more cleaning for us, which is why we originally charged for pets.

The guest probably didn't want to stay somewhere other dogs may have been which is a bit much.

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06/24/2008

Interesting question.  Maybe this is the best way to handle the problem:  have the pet room also designated as the ADA room.

 

OnTheShore's picture
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08/28/2011

This is the current FAQ document about service animals on the government's ADA website, dated 2008: http://www.ada.gov/qasrvc.htm

Apparently some states may be certifying service animals, but the feds say you can't discriminate on that basis....

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"where even time relaxes...."

 

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