Eggs...U.S. vs E.U.

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Breakfast Diva's picture
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Here's an interesting article on eggs. Leave it to the U.S. to make things more complicated (IMHO)

gillumhouse's picture
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I grew up with pure filtered milk! We milked the cows, brought the buckets of milk to the kitchen for Granny to put through the filter, and she bottled it in quarts and put on thecaps.Then to the fridge!

I rarely buy milk - usually if a child is coming. I do not worry about it turning after they leave because I use it in muffins then. I use powdered milk in baking - great shelf life, low-fat, and one cannot tell the difference.

When we left the farm my parents could not afford to buy milk at the way we were used to drinking it (my youngest brother would down a quart at a time) so for the first few weeks she mixed it half & half or made it chocolate, then it was ice cold, and by the end of the month we would mix & drink. Soda pop was NOT in the budget and it was that or nothing. We adjusted to whatever wasnecessary.

Joey Camb's picture
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My mum and her brothers spent their young lives on a farm in ireland - drank milk like that! she passed it on to us - mind you non of them have ostioperosis so must be doing something right!

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gillumhouse's picture
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We don't either. I am the runt of my family @ 5'7", my kid sister is about 5'11" (ore we were before we got old and started shrinking), little/big brother is 7'1", and the baby brother is 6'5". Baby brother used to drink milk by thequart.

Breakfast Diva's picture
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If salmonella can be stopped by a simple vaccine, I don't understand why it's not required here.

Arks's picture
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05/22/2010

Interesting indeed! I'm constantly dropping part of the egg shell into eggs I break, but I'd hope the heat of the cooking would kill any bacteria on the shell, so technically that should not be a problem, other than the mental thought of manure being on the shell outside the USA.

Coming from America where eggs are always in the store's refrigerated section, I've been amazed in visits to Italy and Spain where the cartons of eggs are always just sitting out on the shelves with the corn flakes and canned goods.

Of course, the milk is also out on the hot shelves over there. I've never seen a carton of milk in a refrigerator over seas. They have some process way stronger than Pasteurization!

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Generic's picture
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02/24/2011

It depends on the country and the milk. The milk that you are seeing on the shelves is UHT milk, shelf-stable milk. It's used much more often in Spain and Italy. But when you are in Germany or Luxembourg, expect to find the milk in the refrigerator. And likely to find pure filtered milk, as well.

I have never seen pure filtered milk in the USA, but around here you can buy ordinary milk or pure filtered. The pure filtered still needs to be refrigerated and still 100% pure milk, some people even think it tastes richer. But it is put through an extremely fine filter and while needing to be refrigerated, will last for a month. It's a little more expensive, though, because of the extra processing. But for people who don't drink as much milk or prefer to use a lower fat content, it's preferable. I've seen it only in Northern Europe, though, never in the south. And I haven't been in the UK in at least a decade, so ...

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Madeleine's picture
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When my daughter was in France for college there was a bit of adjustment over the milk and cheese...not stored in the fridge in her host family. We started calling it 'closet milk' because it was in the cupboard. They could not understand why anyone would want to have cold milk. They didn't drink it the way my daughter did. It was just for coffee or cooking.

And that's the fun part of getting an education away from home.

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Joey Camb's picture
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we have the pure filtered (so you know for your visit!) its called craven dale - little bit more expensive but lasts twice as long - we don't bother as milk doesn't have a chance to go off!

Generic's picture
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We don't either. Then again, they look at us weird when they see we get our milk in bags. 3 bags for 4 litres of milk. Cheapest way. They charge more for the cartons.

I don't think I'm going to be in the UK long enough to worry about milk spoiling. I think I'm in the UK for all of 9 hours on my next visit. 

Joey Camb's picture
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no they don't - just stronger immune system from years of eating them! - we use lion branded eggs which means they have been tested in some way for salmonella - I always worry someone is pregnant - means they can have eggs and not worry about it. In the UK they don't recommend pregnant ladies eat runny eggs at all - just in case.

Generic's picture
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They don't suggest that pregnant women eat runny eggs here either.

Bommelhoeve's picture
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08/14/2009

Thanks for the article link, I enjoyed reading this!

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Wow, I am torn between both methods. I know having chooks that the eggs always had crud on them, and always needed to be cleaned. I dont think any place doesnt clean up a prodyct before market. I can't imagine an alternative, but I get the whole infiltrate the porous shell thing too.

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Generic's picture
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02/24/2011

Very interesting. At the farmers market, the eggs here aren't ever refrigerated. Of course, they are also a day or two old at most.

The supermarket eggs are refrigerated, though.

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