Hypothetical question

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Say an aspiring has Celiac's and is allergic to wheat (dust, remnants....) how would you suggest they go about being innkeepers? Dedicated Celiac's menu- niche?

I'm looking for ways to explain that you can have allergies- serious allergies (dogs, cats, wheat, kids Eye-wink , corn, soy, I could go on and on)- and still be able to deal with/work with/serve the general public.

 

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06/24/2008

So what about those that 'may' be allergic to the wheat alternatives.  If they are not knowledgeable of what is used to make those muffins or crapes...  

We hope our guests know that is normally used in breakfast fixings and will let us know they can't eat - this or that.  But if they are not informed what the crapes are made of and think they are traditional ----

Well just more FOOD for thought! 

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Because this person already cooks and live 'free' that can definitely translate to being an innkeeper. S/he doesn't have to serve gluten-based products or even be 'celiac-only'. However, it is a matter of really being able to nail those great gluten-based breakfasts without the gluten.

And, there will need to be some sort of warning on the website and in communications with guests that gluten-based products may not be brought in. So, no cookies and crackers from the outside. (The stuff people bring!)

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Is the person eating the breakfast? or is it that severe that they cannot touch the food? I serve a couple foods here I would or could never eat.

In other news, DUST is another story.  Plus all the sprays and lotions and potions guests use.

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05/22/2008

IF she wants to limit herself and her guests. But for me personally, I would not even consider going to a B & B where I would not get a "normal" breakfast. So what if the innkeeper has the disease...who needs to know. There are plenty of things I won't eat, but that never stopped me from serving them to my guests.  Sorry I don't think this kind of niche will bring that much business....even though everyone these days seems to think gluten free is the way to go...NOT ME!

If an innkeeper has allergies, that is their own problem..not the guests. If it's dogs, then sure..no dogs permitted...but foods....nope x that one out.

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I don't want to book at a B&B, arrive and find there's no toast or biscuits with my egg, no muffins, no cookies, no pancakes etc. If the innkeeper is allergic to the dust and none of these delights are going to be served, let me know up front and I can make my own decision on staying or not.

You must come up with a positive way to say this and to use this, but inform before you perform...no surprises (unless they're good ones)!

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Yes, but if all those items are going to be there, just that they are incidentally GF, does it make a difference? Do you care that the muffin was made with wheat flour or tapioca flour? As long as it tastes like a muffin... it's a muffin.

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Madeleine's picture
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Eric Arthur Blair wrote:

Yes, but if all those items are going to be there, just that they are incidentally GF, does it make a difference? Do you care that the muffin was made with wheat flour or tapioca flour? As long as it tastes like a muffin... it's a muffin.

That's pretty much what I was trying to say. I'd be more 'upset' if I had to eat the same thing everyday because the innkeeper wouldn't even try to make a GF muffin/pancake/waffle.

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02/18/2012

Yeah, I agree with you.  When you set expectations to start out with, people tend to be happy and not even give a second thought - as long as they read what's on your site!

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I was in the UK recently and I saw a B&B sign in a small town that said "A Vegetarian Inn" and all I could think about it is... I'm sure that it's comforting to vegetarians to know, to me it just seems to be indicating that the owners aren't hospitable? Why, because the sign seemed to me to indicate that vegetarians are welcome, or you can "hide" and be one while there, but you can't be yourself.

I serve breakfast to vegetarians, I serve breakfast to Celiacs and I serve breakfast to vegans, doesn't mean that I have to be any of the three or suggest that you need to be, to stay here.

So, I would specifically market to the Coeliacs, but I wouldn't make a special note of it. I would mention that all baked items, etc are GF if that it what you desire. That being said, your wheat-eating guests don't really need to know, as long as you are a good GF baker that anything is really GF. Except of course that everything costs you more to make.

I don't think being Coeliac has anything to do with it at all. It's not relevant. Just as being left-handed isn't relevant. What is... hospitality. It's not like you are going to force anyone into the lifestyle. It's not like you plan on indoctrinating them into never eating wheat again in their lifetime. It's just part of your breakfast cooking. The same way that my origins are part of mine.

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I get the hospitality part of it. I'm wondering if someone who is severely allergic to certain things (especially in the kitchen) can still open or buy a B&B and deal with the expectations that come with it.

I get that non-allergy people, like you and a whole lot of other innkeepers, can serve to allergy people. But I'm thinking the other way around. It's a valid concern. If wheat dust makes me sick, can I realistically think I can run a b&b without having to serve wheat. Or am I delusional. (which could be true, too Smiling  )

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 I think you're right.  A good thing about many food allergies is that you actually have to eat to have a problem. 

 Rather than focus on the NO part of breakfast, they might just say what is served for breakfast (or  sample menus) -not even mentioning the diet - and let guests take it for what it is (we serve a  healthy breakfast of fresh fruit, eggs, and your choice of sausage or homemade granola).  The good thing there, is for breakfast you're in control.

Cats, dogs, pets no problem, it's not expected that you accept pets.

But how about something that you're not in control of- like perfume or lotions...I can't imagine it going over well, that you are a "scent free zone"-please do not, put on perfume...

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CafeMae wrote:

   The good thing there, is for breakfast you're in control.

You've never had my crowd... We only cook and serve the breakfast, we're not really in control. Eye-wink Guests determine what is and isn't on the menu on any given day. Personally, I'd get pretty dang tired of serving eggs-fruit-side everyday. (Altho, I know someone who did just that for years.)

Guests who stay for a week need a little variety during the stay.

Generic's picture
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If you are experienced enough as using GF flours, I don't think most people would even know that they are eating GF. And there are certainly many dishes that they wouldn't even notice. Do you think someone will notice that you mixed buckwheat and tapioca to make crepes? They will just think that's YOUR way of making them. As far as GF, for the most part, no one will even notice that you are GF.

Madeleine's picture
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Again, yes. You don't serve/use wheat. (Not you, whoever the person is.) S/he serves non-gluten bread and pancakes and waffles. Because someone who lives like that all the time is much more able to make meals that taste good w/o gluten.

A totally vegan experience might not work for the masses, but eating gluten-free bread is not going to make anyone cry or wish they had stayed elsewhere.

 

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Penelope wrote:

I get the hospitality part of it. I'm wondering if someone who is severely allergic to certain things (especially in the kitchen) can still open or buy a B&B

The short answer is yes, and you will be busy even with offering a celiac only menu if you have a B&B in a high-traffic area.  With the abundance of good wheat substitutes and alternatives - there are many commercial products out there that make good gluten-free toast out there - some of your guests won't even notice. Your kitchen has to be a safe zone for you, and I would be clear about what you offer (and why, without belaboring the point) on your website and to your guests. I don't believe this has to negatively impact your business any more than taking pets vs. no pets or only having second floor rooms. All of those things take some people out of your target demographic but there are still a lot of people left. 

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Penelope wrote:

I get the hospitality part of it. I'm wondering if someone who is severely allergic to certain things (especially in the kitchen) can still open or buy a B&B and deal with the expectations that come with it.

I get that non-allergy people, like you and a whole lot of other innkeepers, can serve to allergy people. But I'm thinking the other way around. It's a valid concern. If wheat dust makes me sick, can I realistically think I can run a b&b without having to serve wheat. Or am I delusional. (which could be true, too Smiling  )

Without serving any wheat? I don't think that would be possible. But who the heck knows, maybe it would be a destination B&B draw for celiacs and other gluten free diets! There are B&B's that market well to a niche and are full.  Smiling

DH im'd me today and said his mind is playing tricks on him at work. I said "Like a tableful of Indonesians listening to bluegrass?"... so anything is possible!

Joey Camb's picture
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If it helps we have a neighbour who is a B&B owner and celiac's (the Belmont Harrogate) they use it as a way to a niche market - they also take non special diet people but I think it comforts the celiac and gluten free people they will be handled properly

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