Do you have locks on your guest rooms?

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Ice
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02/22/2010
Yes , need key to open
86% (25 votes)
Yes, combination to open
7% (2 votes)
NO, not for bedroom door, just front door (or other main door to the outside)
7% (2 votes)
Total votes: 29

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we put in keypad locks.  they are great.  guests are free to lock if they want, and we never have to worry about guests taking a key home with them.   even though we have only two rooms and are out in the country, most guests ask if they can lock their door. 

our front door is unlocked whenever we have guests.

 

Innkeep's picture
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hummingbird wrote:

we put in keypad locks.  they are great.  guests are free to lock if they want, and we never have to worry about guests taking a key home with them.   even though we have only two rooms and are out in the country, most guests ask if they can lock their door. 

our front door is unlocked whenever we have guests.

 

This is not a criticism, but just a question/ observation:  Since many potential guests are from the big city where leaving the house unlocked all day long would make them uncomfortable, why not install a keypad on the front door?  Some versions do not lock every time the door is closed, but can be locked from the outside as well as the inside.  You can program the same combo for both room and front door.  Arkie has a keypad that is so fancy he can program the codes on the front door locks from his computer from his own home.

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Innkeep wrote:

Arkie has a keypad that is so fancy he can program the codes on the front door locks from his computer from his own home.

Innkeep, I got this enhanced today. You had noticed that when you put in your code and enter the apartment, one of the floor lamps came on. That was temporary. Today I fixed it where the lights that come on when the door opens are atop that divider wall between the living and bedroom areas, the wall that doesn't go all the way up to the ceiling. The lights come on and illuminate the old pressed metal ceiling 14 feet overhead, and stay on 5 minutes before turning themselves off.

I've rigged something similar in the other apartment. Absolutely amazing technology that has functioned perfectly 100% of the time! I love the 21st Century!! Things like this really work now!

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Madeleine's picture
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09/29/2011

I agree. We took the old front door keypads (one was too hard for older guests to turn the knob, the other used to jam on us) and we put those on our doors. Nice to not need keys just to go for a walk. And, I can easily lock the door to my apt and not have to carry a key while in the inn.

Yes, BTW, we are on our 3rd keypad for the entry door. Tough winters? I don't know. This last one does not allow the guest to manipulate anything, which was the problem before. Guests were turning the locking mechanism on the inside to defeat the door lock so they didn't have to remember the code. (Door locked automatically after 10 seconds so keypad was smarter, but all that twisting all the time finally jammed it.)

We did get a lever door handle this time. Knob was too hard to turn with gloves on. Or for the 90 year olds.

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Arks's picture
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Madeleine wrote:

Guests were turning the locking mechanism on the inside to defeat the door lock so they didn't have to remember the code.

My locks had buttons on the inside that could set them to locked or unlocked. I "operated" on them (removed the buttons) so guests cannot set them to the unlocked state. I want it like a hotel room door. If the door is closed, it's ALWAYS locked from the outside. When a guest packs up and leaves, I don't want them to be able to leave the door unlocked. If the door is closed, and you don't know the code, you're NOT getting in my place! In fact, with my system, the guest's code is automatically erased 30 minutes after check out time.

And as Innkeep mentioned, when a reservation comes in, from my home computer I program the guest's personal code to work on THREE keypads in my building, so in addition to working on their apartment door, they can also open two other doors in my building, doors locked to the general public, so they can pass through the building to access the back porch (their private deck) or the front sidewalk. It works perfectly!

I advertise my place as "for the independent, self-sufficient traveler" and so far so good. I've only had people who can work keypad locks, televisions, and dishwashers without having to ask for help!

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Arkansawyer wrote:

 

My locks had buttons on the inside that could set them to locked or unlocked. I "operated" on them (removed the buttons) so guests cannot set them to the unlocked state.

When we were little kids my dad "operated" on the back seat passenger car doors by removing the handles so we couldn't open the doors ever. 

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10/07/2008

I guess for me, THIS is the issue with no locks: The other guests. We all have stories here of guests using other rooms, and even bathrooms/showers. Drunkenness, foolishness and more. Why do you trust the other guests?  They try to pry and get into our own innkeeper quarters all the time.

Guests had self check in this weekend, they told me your dog growled at us. I asked them, did you try to go into my office? He said, "Well I was just wondering what was in there" (since the sign said private and of course we were not at home, no doubt).  She does not growl, unless a person is in our kitchen or our quarters, who trained her?! I sure didn't, she is wonderful this way!

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06/24/2008

Love it. NOT.  The guy goes where he knows he shouldn't, the dog confirms it and then he is foolish enough to tell you about it. 

You should have said, Man you are lucky, the last person that did that ended up in the ER. 

Breakfast Diva's picture
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Put a sign on the door "Guard Dog on Duty, Enter at Your Own Risk"!

Madeleine's picture
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Breakfast Diva wrote:

Put a sign on the door "Guard Dog on Duty, Enter at Your Own Risk"!

"Beware of teenagers."

"Here be dogs."

"Beware. Behind this door is a very tired innkeeper."

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Madeleine wrote:

"Beware. Behind this door is a very tired innkeeper."

WE all know how scary that can be!!!!

Breakfast Diva's picture
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GOOD DOGGIE!! The nerve of some guests still amazes me.

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Well, we don't, exactly.  We have old-fashioned surface locks.  They are original to the house.  There is a simple flip lock for when you are inside the room, but since the skeleton keys were lost long ago, the rooms don't lock when the guests are out.  Since there are only two rooms, and we are always on the premises when guests are in residence, we just didn't see the need.

After reading your comments, this will be re-visited. 

If we were in the big city, the mindset would indeed be different.

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Anon Inn wrote:

Well, we don't, exactly.  We have old-fashioned surface locks.  They are original to the house.  There is a simple flip lock for when you are inside the room, but since the skeleton keys were lost long ago, the rooms don't lock when the guests are out.  Since there are only two rooms, and we are always on the premises when guests are in residence, we just didn't see the need.

After reading your comments, this will be re-visited. 

If we were in the big city, the mindset would indeed be different.

Think about the big city people who come to visit. Did I ever tell you about the guy who I thought must be a smoker who went down the stairs, outside, and around the porch about 15 times during the night? I thought he wasn't a smoker and I finally had to ask him, he said "No I don't smoke, just checking on my car"

UGH!

Now, I grew up in a place where more cars are stolen than perhaps any other, and even I don't do that!

Breakfast Diva's picture
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I have one guest room that has a skeleton key for their door and it sounds much like what you have...there's a dead bolt that is for use once they are in their room. I have two other doors in a large suite that also has skeleton keys they can use to lock the doors inside their suite.

Turns out that the skeleton keys work all the doors. If you're able to order a couple skeleton keys online or from a locksmith I bet they would work in your doors if you could find a generic one.  One guest doesn't have to know that their key will open the other guest room. It's all about their perception that theeir room is private and locked.

Your location and my location are very similar...off the beaten path. We never lock our car, etc., but our guests are from cities where they lock everything and if they're not able to lock their room when they leave for the day might make them feel very uncomfortable, but they probably wouldn't mention it to you. Just think about how often you hear the car alarm beep (turn on and off) when your guests are there. It's just habit.

By the way, my guests think those skeleton keys are really cool!

Madeleine's picture
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09/29/2011

I have a friend who does only 3 rooms. No locks. No key to the entry door. She says she is always there. But where? In her own part of the house? In her other business? Can she really keep track? She says she can 'hear' people if they are on the stairs. But can she drop everything to really go check? And can she really tell if guest A is going into guest B's room? (Or that HER KIDS are snooping?)

And, if she really IS always there when guests are in residence, how does she get anything else done? She locks the guests out of the house until she comes back!

Take a look at simple locks. You and the guests will rest easier.

gillumhouse's picture
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05/22/2008

Anon Inn wrote:

Well, we don't, exactly.  We have old-fashioned surface locks.  They are original to the house.  There is a simple flip lock for when you are inside the room, but since the skeleton keys were lost long ago, the rooms don't lock when the guests are out.  Since there are only two rooms, and we are always on the premises when guests are in residence, we just didn't see the need.

After reading your comments, this will be re-visited. 

If we were in the big city, the mindset would indeed be different.

It is the mind-set of the guests that count. Most of my WV guests do not bother locking the doors when they leave the room (even for the day) but the Big City guests lock the door to their room to come down to breakfast. They are so used to locking things - often multiple locks - that they are uneasy with the thought of NOT locking.

Ice
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02/22/2010

The reason I asked...  DH and I went to a B&B and to my surprise there were no locks!  Also when she was showing us around she showed us the other guest room and a guest had already checked in.   I didn't think I was the only one with locks!

Madeleine's picture
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09/29/2011

Yikes! She actually opened up another guest's room to show it to you??? Well, you know she would do that to you as well. And what if you were asleep? Or just getting out of the shower?

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05/22/2008

Oh my..did you say anything to her? If not, I might suggest a nice note.  Obviously she thought since it was her house she could show you around no

Joey Camb's picture
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04/02/2010

there was a woman on 4 in a bed (tv program where BB owners stay at each others places) all 3 other owners pointed out lack of locks - owner who was a woman said no guests have mentioned it as a problem - yup maybe not but have they stayed again? I wouldn't! trust the owner as they wouldn't be in business long if they were filtching guests stuff but I certainly don't trust other guests!

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06/24/2008

Locks are a must IMHO.   I did stay at one with no locks, although there was a screen door latch if you were in the room.  Not much sleep went on there as the door was also a louver style door too so light came in from the hall and so did any sound! 

This place did not stay in business much longer, and never a B&B again. 

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05/22/2008

Of course, you must have locks. People need to feel they have control of their room. even if you have a master key...people want to know their privacy is protected. Locks are required by most B & B associations.

gillumhouse's picture
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05/22/2008

We have dead bolt locks on every guestroom and on the shared bath (and I have the only keys to the bathroom lock to ensure privacy there - lock on the inside and if the lock is not retracted, I get up at 3 AM to unlock it).

 

Madeleine's picture
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I don't like not having a lock on the bedroom door. Who's watching my 'stuff' while I'm out? I can't haul everything with me. And, how can I sleep unless I drag a chair under the doorknob?

Arks's picture
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05/22/2010

Can't IMAGINE not having a lock, for both assured privacy when you're in the room, and security when you're out.

To be included on their list, I think AAA and Select Registry require both a lock and a dead bolt.

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10/07/2008

I have been to two three inns who didn't. They may have them now.

Proud Texan's picture
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05/30/2008

Why wouldn't you?

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