digital door entry security

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07/23/2008

For all of you who use the digital door locks we have a question...

How often do you change the combination? 

Is it a hassle? 

have you ever had anyone try to come back and use the combo to get in when they were no longer a guest?? 

do any of you use the smart phone technology??

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Arks's picture
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It's called "oil rubbed bronze" and seemed more fitting for a 111 year old building than the brushed nickel, shiny brass, and other finishes they offer.

Unlike with a round door knob, with this type handle, if you have both hands full, you can stick out one finger, punch in your code, and turn the latch with your one finger, or an elbow, to open the door. Much better for people with arthritis, too.

The handle is of course reversible so it can hang out the other side if needed depending on which side of the door your latch is on.

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Highlands John's picture
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Looks like a project for the winter for me.

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sonatainn's picture
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We have RFID locks through Kaba Ilco, installed in all of our rooms, and entrances....I highly recommend them (though they are pricey.)

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Our state park cabins have door access codes. Some parks use your reservation # some your phone number. The issue is they are hard to see because there is a screen/storm door you open then the key pad is a HARD right against a dark door frame. They are not illuminated. The ones that are once you hit a button are nice.

The last cabin we had did not have an audible beep and I kept thinking it wasn't taking the numbers. The same thing here used to drive me crazy hearing the audible beep beep beep all the time, so the one we have now is much quieter. The one on our back door to the kitchen is louder.

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Arks's picture
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Joey Bloggs wrote:

The issue is they are hard to see because there is a screen/storm door you open then the key pad is a HARD right against a dark door frame. They are not illuminated.

On mine, the keypads light up for a few seconds, if you touch the long button above the number keys. It would greatly reduce battery life if they lit up every time you use the keypad, so they have the lights only come on when you really need them. In my confirmation e-mail I include the image below with instructions to tap the long button on top to light the keys, if needed. They won't read it but maybe they'll glance at the photo!

Ice
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Arkansawyer wrote:

Joey Bloggs wrote:

The issue is they are hard to see because there is a screen/storm door you open then the key pad is a HARD right against a dark door frame. They are not illuminated.

On mine, the keypads light up for a few seconds, if you touch the long button above the number keys. It would greatly reduce battery life if they lit up every time you use the keypad, so they have the lights only come on when you really need them. In my confirmation e-mail I include the image below with instructions to tap the long button on top to light the keys, if needed. They won't read it but maybe they'll glance at the photo!

That looks like the one I have for the Lodge.  Same color and everything!

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I was looking at one similar to that. I like that the lights don't stay on to wear down the battery life. And that they don't come on in the day time. 

We are considering putting them on the individual guest rooms as well. NO MORE KEYS! 

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Sunshine wrote:

I was looking at one similar to that. I like that the lights don't stay on to wear down the battery life. And that they don't come on in the day time. 

We are considering putting them on the individual guest rooms as well. NO MORE KEYS! 

I'm also considering adding them to the rooms.

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Sunshine wrote:

I was looking at one similar to that. I like that the lights don't stay on to wear down the battery life. And that they don't come on in the day time. 

We are considering putting them on the individual guest rooms as well. NO MORE KEYS! 


The lights won't wear it down as much as the key pad functioning. 

Innkeep's picture
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06/04/2008

Like Joey, I have a programmable lock and program a number easy for me to remember.  I change it infrequently, haven't had any problems, but I'm not in a touristy place and have orders of magnitude fewer PITAs than Maddie.

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02/24/2011

We currently do it manually, but plan on moving over to Yale and Zwave in the future. Never had them try to access after. We program it the day of arrival. It works wonders when they need to let themselves in for late arrival. And we make those who arrive at normal check-in time "test" our code for them to ensure they know how it works.

 

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Arks's picture
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My locks are Internet-connected and hold about 20 different combinations at a time. They are programmed from my office computer (or any Internet-connected computer or smartphone).

A week before the guests arrive, I enter their unique code for their door in the computer, set the date/time it is to become activated (check-in time), and the date/time it is to be deactivated (check-out time...I tell them 11:00 but set their code to work until 11:30 to give a safety margin for them). Then I just forget about it. It's all automatic from there. So far it has worked flawlessly.

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Arkansawyer wrote:

My locks are Internet-connected and hold about 20 different combinations at a time. They are programmed from my office computer (or any Internet-connected computer or smartphone).

A week before the guests arrive, I enter their unique code for their door in the computer, set the date/time it is to become activated (check-in time), and the date/time it is to be deactivated (check-out time...I tell them 11:00 but set their code to work until 11:30 to give a safety margin for them). Then I just forget about it. It's all automatic from there. So far it has worked flawlessly.

Arky, what system do you have? This sounds wonderful!! Do you do this for the front door too??? 

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Sunshine wrote:

Arky, what system do you have? This sounds wonderful!! Do you do this for the front door too??? 

It's the Schlage LiNK system (they still call it that on Amazon but it's actually called Nexia Home Intelligence now). Anyway, you only need one "starter set" that includes:

  1. the "black box" wireless transmitter called the "link bridge"
  2. one lock set (door knob)
  3. a lamp controller

Then you buy additional lock sets (door knobs) individually, so they're cheaper than the starter set. The wireless transmits through my double-thick brick walls really well, so 1 link bridge in the center of the building reaches every lock in my building.

Also, the lamp controllers double as a "repeater" so they pick up the wireless signal and rebroadcast it full strength to give extended range. The link bridge plugs into your Wi-Fi router to connect the locks to the Internet for remote programming.

Yes, you'd set each guest's personal code to work with the front door, and also with their own room door, and any other doors on the property you want to give them access to. The locks will hold 19 different codes at a time, so all your guests' private room codes can also work on the front door.

I mentioned the lamp controller that comes with the starter set (they're also available separately). With those, I have my rooms set up to turn on accent lighting in the room each time the guest enters their code to enter the room. I have mine set to turn on the accent lighting at 60% brightness, then go off automatically 5 minutes later. You have total control over the dim/brightness level and how long they stay on.

Another bonus of the system is that, optionally, you can have it send you an e-mail and/or text message each time the guest enters their code on a particular lock set. You don't have to use this, but it's very handy for me, since I don't live on site at the guest house. For example, if the Smith's are due to arrive today for their stay, it will send me an e-mail when the Smith's enter their code the first time and enter their room, so I know they've arrived and I go ahead and charge their balance due at that time. (Yes, this system lets me have self-check-in for all guests. I don't have to care what time they arrive. They let themselves in, always.)

I love this system! It really works perfectly...so far at least. The lock sets run on batteries that it says will last 2 years, but I change the batteries yearly just to be sure they are going to always work.

If the power is off or the Internet is down, people's codes still work just fine. You just can't add/delete new codes until the wireless is working again.

When guests make their online reservations I have ResKey give them the option to enter their preferred 4-digit entry code. Some give one and I program that into their lock. Others leave it blank and I assign them something random.

Highlands John's picture
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04/16/2010

Wow. That sounds brilliant, it would solve so many issues that we have just come to tolerate without even realizing it. Is it just a standard door handle replacement, my front door is pvc so I couldn't just chisel out a bigger hole as in a wooden door.

Arks's picture
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05/22/2010

Highlands John wrote:

Is it just a standard door handle replacement, my front door is pvc so I couldn't just chisel out a bigger hole as in a wooden door.

Yes. Just remove the old door handle and the new one fits the same holes, at least for standard doors in the US. Can't speak for PVC doors that wear kilts.

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Arkansawyer wrote:

My locks are Internet-connected and hold about 20 different combinations at a time. They are programmed from my office computer (or any Internet-connected computer or smartphone).

A week before the guests arrive, I enter their unique code for their door in the computer, set the date/time it is to become activated (check-in time), and the date/time it is to be deactivated (check-out time...I tell them 11:00 but set their code to work until 11:30 to give a safety margin for them). Then I just forget about it. It's all automatic from there. So far it has worked flawlessly.

Arky, what system do you have? This sounds wonderful!! Do you do this for the front door too??? 

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10/07/2008

We rarely change it. We have had no issues. We have a second deadbolt that is locked when we are home without any guests. Yes, it is a hassle to change it. If it weren't we would do it more often. I can't even recall how to do it right now.

Madeleine's picture
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09/29/2011

Combo changes for every guest. They each get their own. Not a hassle and I do the whole thing manually. Yes, guests have come back and let themselves in if I don't get their code out right away. (Not a whole lot different than when we just had the door unlocked all day. But better than when the code was the same for everyone and we couldn't remove it after guests left.)

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