Starting a B & B

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Lea Ann's picture
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10/11/2013

We are in the process of buying an old house that we are going to convert to an inn/B and B. This home was built in 1930 and has wonderful bones. It even has the original chandeliers in the dining and living room. One of the rooms was probably the parlor back in the day and the hubby wants to make it a rentable room. It has these French doors that I love and don't want to take out. His concern is the noise. Does anyone have any experience with this and could possibly help me save these doors!

Thanks

 

TheBeachHouse's picture
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06/24/2013

Another thought - do you need this room in order to afford the house?  If not, it might make sense to live with the house for a year before making huge changes.  

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Lea Ann's picture
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We actually own a home in the area, this is more for an investment and we see a need in our area for something small since we have a community college in the area. 

TheBeachHouse's picture
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Can you use the French doors elsewhere in the house and install a better type of door in that area?

Lea Ann's picture
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The problem with the French doors is that they open to what would be the common area.  The room also has doors that open up to a small private porch and a door off the main hallway.  So there are three ways to enter the room.  If we end up removing the doors (which is probably what will happen) I want to save them for possible use later in the home.

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I think you would be wise to remove and save the doors for someplace else. You will need to close off for privacy. Be sure and fill that space with plenty of insulation/soundproofing if near common area.

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01/12/2013

My quarters are on the other side of french doors, in the foyer, next to the stairs going to guest rooms and just steps from the front door.  I have heavy drapes on mine, and draft guards at the bottom.   I placed a table with brochures, maps, etc in front of the doors to keep people from congregating there, or trying the door handle (!).  I have a little iPod player tucked behind a brochure rack to play music and keep any noise from transferring through.  I also have a dehumidifier going pretty much 24/7 (I'm located on the Gulf Coast - always humid here) located just out of the picture - that also helps.

So I think it just depends on your layout of the house, and furniture placement behind the doors.  But there are things you can do to help drown out the noise.  Can you take a picture to give us a better idea?

Lea Ann's picture
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Where are you at on the gulf coast?

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Lea Ann, I'm in Galveston, about 45 miles south of Houston.  I emailed you my website.

Lea Ann's picture
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We are in MS, I was hoping you were closer so maybe we could take a field trip and pick your brain. smiley

Lea Ann's picture
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This room also has a small porch with double doors going out to the porch.  Just as soon as the deal is done I will post a couple of pics to give you guys a better idea

Thanks for your input!

Breakfast Diva's picture
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It depends on a lot of factors. Location, how the guest room is layed out, i.e. is it a large room with bed not near door, etc. We have 1 guest room with a French door. I've put very thick draperies on the guest side of the door so they aren't so aware that it's a French door when they're in their room. This room layout is a bit strange and the bed area is not near the door, so you don't hear sounds. It's off a common area, but don't hang around it talking, so it's very private when you're in the guest room. It works for us, but you must be very careful.

Joey Camb's picture
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04/02/2010

it depends where the French doors are -ie to the outside or to the inside? inside I would say depends on who foot traffic would move past that room and outside depends on how quiet the area you are in, is.

Plus I am a pragmatist - a bedroom would bring you in more money - do you need it to pay the mortgage? would it be an attractive large double? especially if it is ground floor these rooms are a premium - I have 2 ground floors and they are requested more than anything else

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Arks's picture
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05/22/2010

Welcome to Innspiring, Lea Ann, and good luck with your plans!

Most sound travels through the air, so maximum quite will involve closing all gaps where light or air can flow under or around the doors. At the same time, if the house has central heat/AC, you have to allow some way for air return to the central system. If the room has its own heat and air system, this won't be a problem.

The other way sound travels is through vibration. Single pane glass in the French doors can imperceptibly vibrate and transfer the sound into the guestroom. I don't have any thoughts on how to prevent that, without installing new doors with double-pane glass, and I know you don't want to do that!

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gillumhouse's picture
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05/22/2008

I have 2 sets of French Doors but both are on my side of the house. One set is between what was the parlor and the dining room - now our bedroom and the parlor is now DH's art studio (was supposed to be our living room). The other set is between what was the parlor (now studio) and the enclosed part of the front porch that Mrs. Gillum had as a sun room (now DH workshop). Both have glass panes in them. I have lace sheers on the set to our room for privacy. When closed, I do not hear a lot from his TV or radio, but he keeps them low due to guestroom above him.

I would discourage from making it a rentable room. I do not have any common area other than dining room or porch and wish I had more. What you MAY be able to do with that room is rent it out for meetings or small parties (shower/cards/book clubs) as the French doors would allow it to be closed off and private.

Not knowing the layout of the house, this is a suggestion. If it is rented as  a room, you will have to figure out how to give it a bathroom - and bathrooms are not cheap!

 

And I neglected to say Welcome. Keep us posted on the French doors.

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