Y'all, youse and you guys...

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Madeleine's picture
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Take the quiz to see how your dialect stacks up to where you live...

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2013/12/20/sunday-review/dialect-quiz...

I couldn't get more NYC/New England if I had studied for the quiz...

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seashanty's picture
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crying

Arks's picture
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Somebody British told me "chemist" is becoming "pharmacist" in the UK.

Social media and the Internet are killing our wonderful differences. We were NEVER intended to know that anybody called a soda "tonic"!!!

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Madeleine's picture
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In another way, we are preserving language as well. Tucking words away that we like and using them when others have stopped.

What's worse, I think, is losing accents. And whole dialects.

Innkeep's picture
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Madeleine wrote:

In another way, we are preserving language as well. Tucking words away that we like and using them when others have stopped.

What's worse, I think, is losing accents. And whole dialects.

So true.

seashanty's picture
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i am right on target. interesting, we USED to say tonic but it's given way to soda. 

Innkeep's picture
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I stumped it twice, then it put me in 3 cities west of the Mississippi.  Mom was from Philly, I grew up in Inndiana and lived a good chunk of time in the south.

People who are deaf and use sign language also have a bunch of different versions.  The reason it's called American sign language here is because they sign differently in other parts of the world. (just FYI)

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See, it can't find where I'm from in the US. Sometimes it puts me in Florida, like Fort Lauderdale, othertimes it's thinks I'm from places like Boston, Reno or Toledo. 

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I am too much a mish mash of cultures and countries to get this even close to accurate. Soda, Pop, Sodie Pop, Coke, etc...

The one I always laugh about is this, and it wasn't on the test, I have used these four in my lifetime thus far:

At the grocery store that thing ON WHEELS you push around and put your items into is a:

  1. Virginia it is a Buggy
  2. Southern Calf was a Shopping Basket, or Grocery Basket
  3. Seattle was a Shopping Cart
  4. Sydney Australia was a Shopping Trolley

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Madeleine's picture
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It's kind of fun to see how your responses line up with the averages across the country. There were a few where I do not have a word for that. Like the grassy strip between the sidewalk and the road. It's just 'the grassy strip between the sidewalk and the road'. (Or, the shortened version 'grassy strip'.) We didn't have grassy areas where I grew up so did not need a word for it.

I interchange 'rotary' and 'roundabout' NOW but that's because I went to Ireland and loved the word 'roundabout' so I use it now. But if you asked me quick? It's rotary.

And, have to ask...who has the small road that runs along the highway? Is that a thing? What is the purpose? Around here any road running parallel to the highway is just another road. 

Silverspoon's picture
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LOL!  I can identify with what you are saying!  No name for grassy strip between road and side walk because there have rarely been sidewalks in the rural areas I am from. And how about the little bug that curls up when you touch it.  WHAT?  I have no idea what that might be!  surprise

Rotary is standard fare here...we love to watch visitors from other parts of the country try to negotiate them during the summer...takes 2 or three times around before some of them figure out how to get off!

But "sneakers", "grinders", and "lightening bugs"?  Now those are terms we know!

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Madeleine's picture
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I was torn between subs and heros. And, as I'm typing here, Google did not recognize either of them as valid words!

I remember that bug from To Kill a Mockingbird but that's it. At first I thought they meant wooly bears but they aren't gray.

DH often asks how I get certain words when I don't know them at all... Context. Plus I read a lot.

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Madeleine wrote:

I was torn between subs and heros. And, as I'm typing here, Google did not recognize either of them as valid words!

I remember that bug from To Kill a Mockingbird but that's it. At first I thought they meant wooly bears but they aren't gray.

DH often asks how I get certain words when I don't know them at all... Context. Plus I read a lot.

Well yeah see that is the thing, we have plenty of other terms, torpedo sandwiches, submarine sandwiches, heros, grinders, etc.  We are all too well versed to be from one area alone now-a-days.

Madeleine's picture
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Another one they didn't take on is the ice cream drink...

  • Milk shake?
  • Frappe?
  • Malted?
Breakfast Diva's picture
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egg cream?

gillumhouse's picture
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or Black Cow

gillumhouse's picture
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And, have to ask...who has the small road that runs along the highway? Is that a thing? What is the purpose? Around here any road running parallel to the highway is just another road.

We had frontage roads in Illinois and there were some on our Road Trip - they are roads parallel to the main highway to access the businesses along the highway without impeding traffic to get to them. Traffic flows nicely and business thrives because of the traffic.

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It was interesting.  It had me pegged in 3 cities all close enough to make me feel this was very well done. One was my current of 30 years and that was based on my answer to 3 questions that use a certain term not common anywhere else so it could not go wrong there.

And though it did not place my birth city (and Mother's home) in the mix, there were several answers regarding sounds that I was more like that area than where I was raised, or are now.  Goes to show me that my Mom's dialect had more of an influence on me than I thought. 

Maddie - I too had no idea there was a name for that strip of land between the sidewalk and the street.  All carbonated beverages are C oke - then you say Dr. Pep per!  It's like tea, here all tea is Iced & sweet unless specified!  And around here all interstates have roads parallel.  We call them service roads here, think it was due to allowing access to the interstate for servicing, though I don't ever recall seeing service trucks/cars using it to work on the interstate these days.

Breakfast Diva's picture
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It was right on for me too! SF area with a little SO CA thrown in. Didn't list any cities in my current location though. Guess I was already set in my ways by the time I moved here.

Pretty fascinating!

Silverspoon's picture
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Yup, raised on the boarder between MA and NY, so my dialect has a split personality.  On the average, it nailed my childhood home town exactly!

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Placed me about 2 hours from home. so that hits the mark I'd say Smiling

OnTheShore's picture
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Some of those questions were tough! I would have checked more than one answer in many cases, if I could have....

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Arks's picture
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This site has some interesting similar info.

Hey! It says in Virginia Arky means old-fashioned or out of style. I just call it traditional.

Arks's picture
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Gillum, it took about 2 minutes for my map and cities to appear, so you may not have given enough time. Never thought of you as impatient Eye-wink

It pinpointed me well, listing Little Rock, Oklahoma City, and Shreveport as places where I can speak the local language fluently.

It also said I probably couldn't understand a word Madeleine says, and she sure couldn't understand me. We'd better stick to typing our communication.

I've seen these language tests before, but this was by far the most sophisticated. 

I'll bet Innkeep says pop when everybody knows it's a soda we're talking about.

gillumhouse's picture
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My dear friend from NC says drink. She once ordered a drink and the waitress said we cannot serve that here. My friend said, "you can't serve Dr. Pepper?" That was when it was discovered tat by drink she meant pop.

 

I took it again and it gave me a map this time. Several questions were different or had different answers offered. My map put me in Omaha, Lincoln, or Wichita.

Joey Camb's picture
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honey even I know pop means soda/carbonated beverage of some kind and I'm not even from the US

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I'm as Mid-Western as one can get Smiling

gillumhouse's picture
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I guess I was all over the map because it did not show me one. Did not display any cities either.

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