Sweets for breakfast

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Madeleine's picture
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If you had to pick ONE pastry/bread/muffin/donut/sweet starter that is 'traditional' or well-loved in your neck of the woods, what would that be? Something you either introduce your guests to or something they expect to have, that sort of thing. Limit it to something you would serve for breakfast rather than a 'pie' unless you serve pie for breakfast!

Go!

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Our breakfast starts our day, So it should be healthy enough to give a good start to our day. I would suggest you to eat fruit salad of different type that will keep you light whole day as well as refreshing.

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I used to make fruit crisps in the cold months - very traditionally deep South, like a Brown Betty.  Peach, cherry, blueberry, etc. 

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Anon Inn's picture
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Ha Ha.  According to my mom, Pie and coffee was the best possible breakfast!

Scones are probably the most common sweet available locally for breakfast, but no real regional standard here.

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Anon Inn wrote:

Ha Ha.  According to my mom, Pie and coffee was the best possible breakfast.

I agree with your Mom 100% and so do my kids! It's my personal favorite breakfast. But I wouldn't serve it to my guests for breakfast. 

My guests seem to LOVE it when I serve Cinnamon rolls with breakfast.

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Leftover birthday cake.... the best breakfast ever!

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Anon Inn wrote:

Ha Ha.  According to my mom, Pie and coffee was the best possible breakfast!

Scones are probably the most common sweet available locally for breakfast, but no real regional standard here.

 

I served apple and pumpkin pie for the day after Thanksgiving breakfast.   Smiling

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Anadama Bread.  The story is that it was invented on this island.  There used to be a factory in this town that made it.   Now it is only made by local bakers.  It's a heavy molasses bread.

We buy the frozen dough from a local baker and bake it the morning we serve it.

From Wikipedia: It is not readily agreed exactly when or where the bread originated, except it existed before 1850 in Rockport, Massachusetts. It is thought to have come from the local fishing community,[1][2] but it may have come through the Finnish community of local stonecutters.

Near the turn of the 20th century, it was baked by a man named Baker Knowlton on King Street in Rockport, Massachusetts and delivered in a horse-drawn cart to households by men in blue smocks. In the 1940s, a Rockport restaurant owned by Bill and Melissa Smith called The Blacksmith Shop on Mt. Pleasant St. started baking the bread for their restaurant in a small bakery on Main St. They baked about 80 loaves a day until 1956, when they built a modern $250,000 bakery on Pooles Lane. They had 70 employees and 40 trucks which delivered Anadama bread all over New England.

The Anadama bread center of consumption was in Rockport and next-door Gloucester, Massachusetts. It was commercially available from local bakeries widely on Cape Ann from the early 1900s until 1970, when the Anadama Bread Bakery on Pooles Lane in Rockport closed due to Bill Smith's death. For a number of years, it was baked by small local bakeries at breakfast places on Cape Ann.

 

From atasteofhistory.com

This soft, comfortingly sweet, cornmeal-and-molasses bread has a colorful history. For years, New Englanders have passed down two stories that attempt to explain the meaning of this bread’s unique name. Both revolve around a fishing village household. The first tells of a Gloucester, Massachusetts, fisherman, whose wife, Anna, prepared nothing for him to eat but a bowl of cornmeal and molasses. Desirous of something different to eat, one day he added yeast and flour to his daily gruel, in an attempt to create a tasteful bread. So frustrated was he in this endeavor that he grumbled, “Anna, damn her!”

A similar but more endearing story tells of a sea captain whose wife, Anna, was quite a good baker and renowned for her cornmeal and molasses bread. New England lore suggests that upon her death her gravestone read, “Anna was a lovely bride, but Anna, damn ’er, up and died.”

 

 

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Yup, Anadama bread is common down here as well.  In fact, I have some rising in a bowl by the stove as we speak!  We are expecting a winter blizzard to night so I've got a pot of pea soup and Anadama bread in the works.  

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Thinking of all of you in the storm's path...be safe. We just have a few flurries and that is really all that is expected here.

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EmptyNest wrote:

Thinking of all of you in the storm's path...be safe. We just have a few flurries and that is really all that is expected here.

Up to 16" expected here. And wicked cold temps.

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My daughter in Chicago said they have 15 inches. She is hoping it has stopped. I just hope it is enough to keep the cruds off the streets - but then if they are cooped up, she gets the domestics and they can be more dangerous.

 

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EmptyNest wrote:

Thinking of all of you in the storm's path...be safe. We just have a few flurries and that is really all that is expected here.



Interesting innkeeper story.  had a call from a neighbor to see if we have a generator and vacancy.  She is planning to come here for a room if she loses power!

Answers were yes and yes.   The generator won't give them light, but it will power the oil burner.   And we have lots of lanterns.

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Expecting 15 or so inches.  Winds are picking up.  Don't expect damage, just lots of snow and wind. 

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There are 2 such traditional sweets here, one I serve seasonally the other do not attempt.  The seasonal one - King Cake is similar to a cinnamon coffee cake, these I purchase rather than make from one of 2 famous bakeries.  (I found a Christmas version at a local grocery I served the Innmates but when I tried it I was not overly taken by it though, sorry girls) 
The other are beignets which are deep fried and oh so yummy.  I don't deep fry anything, besides they are best at THE coffee place in big city!  I tell everyone that is a must!

Mostly I serve biscuits with jam or honey or fruit/cream cheese croissants.   I had dropped making the muffins for the most part except for early departures.

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Do you do "Galette des Rois" for Epiphany? Filled with frangipane. If you find the bean (usually now a figurine) you are crowned king for the day. (The President of France is not allowed to draw the king, so he gets a cake without the bean!)

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Well we start the 'parties' on Day of Epiphany and continue to MG day.  Our king cakes are a little different than what you picture but we do put a 'baby' inside the cake.  Here, it stands for the baby Jesus.  The person 'lucky' enough to get the baby hosts the next king cake party!  Most are cinnamon but the best are filled with cream cheese and or fruit (gelled).  

Edited to add:

 

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What Americans call a chocolate croissant, but we would NEVER call it that, since it's not shaped like a crescent. 

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Sugar Bear wrote:

What Americans call a chocolate croissant, but we would NEVER call it that, since it's not shaped like a crescent. 

Love these!

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Sugar Bear wrote:

What Americans call a chocolate croissant, but we would NEVER call it that, since it's not shaped like a crescent. 

What is a chocolate croissant?

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We have chocolatine, which the French also call "Pain au chocolat". It is two to three bars of chocolate in a rolled up dough.

 

 

 

 

But a chocolate croissant would have a crescent shape, with the sides visibly smaller than the middle and look like... 

 

 

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Now that DOES resemble a sausage roll from down under (one of the variations of them) definitely not chocolate. At the bakeries in Oz there are almond croissants, filled with some sort of rum butter cream or something, and icing sugar all over them, and all over you when you eat them.

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Almond croissant come in two types. The normal ones are regular croissant with pate d'amande (almond paste) inside and a few almonds on top and icing sugar. 

And then there is a harder variation, that is more cookie danish like, but I havn't been able to find a recipe to make my own.

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Sugar Bear wrote:

We have chocolatine, which the French also call "Pain au chocolat". It is two to three bars of chocolate in a rolled up dough.

 

 

 

 

But a chocolate croissant would have a crescent shape, with the sides visibly smaller than the middle and look like... 

 

 

Leave it to Sugar to try to rope us Yanks into this one! I have never even seen those before in my life. 

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There is a whole thing about the "sadness" of chocolatine. The two or three bars are often placed in a way that when you look it from the side, it seems to be very sad.... and needs to be eaten to make it happy again Smiling

 

Look at the top picture, you can see the sad puppy dog face with two droopy eyes.

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Au Bon Pain is a chain. They have several in Pittsburgh and they have them In VA - 

Virginia Tech - 225 Squires Student Center, 125 College Ave., Blacksburg 24061 - 540-231-9421
Virginia Tech - 225 Squires Student Center Kiosk, Otey & College Ave., Blacksburg 24061 - 540-231-5859

The list had them in most States but not in WV yet.

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First and last one I ever saw was in DC. I do know it's a chain, just haven't seen one in 20 years.

I remember it because DH & I were on our first trip together. We were walking around DC and decided to stop and get a coffee. We ate outside at one of their tables while homeless people slept on the grates or sat and watched us.

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My first was in 1986 in Boston near the Back Bay Hilton. A manager at the hotel I was working at got me a room there for $35 per night. It was one of the placves we stayed with 2 beds and the girls og the bed one night and the boys got it the next - off nights got the floor in sleeping bags. That is how we were able to take the kids all over the US, even to places we did not have friends or family to stop over with.

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Darn mouse! Dupe

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Joey Bloggs wrote:

Sugar Bear wrote:

What Americans call a chocolate croissant, but we would NEVER call it that, since it's not shaped like a crescent. 

What is a chocolate croissant?

I don't know about SB, but around here it would be pain chocolat. Pain means bread. Croissant dough rolled around either a sheet of chocolate or a chocolate filling. Baked into a rectangular shaped pastry a bit bigger than a deck of cards, drizzled with more chocolate and dusted with powdered sugar. Divine!

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We had those in Boston in 1986 at a place called (can't remember) Au Pain. Oh they were soooo good!!

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gillumhouse wrote:

We had those in Boston in 1986 at a place called (can't remember) Au Pain. Oh they were soooo good!!

Au Bon Pain.

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YES!!!

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Joey Bloggs wrote:

What is a chocolate croissant?

I never heard of that either, but I want one!

Speaking earlier of fried pies, I was raised on them, apricot ones and apple ones, until my mother decided they were too much trouble to make. These days I get them once a year, when the Humane Society ladies make them as a fund raiser.

A restaurant near here is famous for their chocolate fried pies, with a filling something like Nutella rather than a fruit pie filling, and they are good, but not really traditional around here like the peach, apricot, and apple ones (that's 3 separate pies, not mixed into 1 pie).

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The home made fried pies I had came from dried, then reconstituted apricots.  Is that the way your mom made them?

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Innkeep wrote:

The home made fried pies I had came from dried, then reconstituted apricots.  Is that the way your mom made them?

Yep. From dried apricots. My mouth is watering.

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I honestly cannot think of a breakfast sweet that is regional here. Not having grown up in this area is part of the problem and having a "split" childhood is the other. I grew up in West Virginia with a Chicago Mother - I could not win if I tried! My Mom baked a lot but breakfasts were basic - sweets were cookies, cobblers, klotchkes, cakes, etc. Sometimes she would make cinnamon/raisin rolls. Mostly in winter it would be cooked hot cereal that was cheap to do and summer it would be corn flakes - although I started many a day whacking off a big slice of her homemade bread that I then slathered with ketchup.

Just asked a friend who grew up here and he said they had pie for breakfast sometimes. Pancakes with lots of syrup would be a sweet breakfast.

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We don't have a specific item that's from here, but if it's got butter, cheese, yogurt, or anything else dairy it's our regional dish!

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Oh well, if you want what the locals eat at home for their morning sweets:

Bake a batch of homemade biscuits (or Pillsbury and Great Value also sell great ones frozen that bake up perfect in about 20 minutes). No canned biscuits, please!

Pour about 2 tbs sorghum molasses into your plate then stir about 1 tbs butter into it. 

Eat it with the hot biscuit.

Repeat until you cannot hold any more.

That's how the locals eat it but of course you could butter the biscuit, pour the sorghum on top like pancake syrup, and dig in with a fork, but then locals would cast suspicious eyes your way.

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It doesn't seem like anyone yet has a regional sweet starter they serve. Something you only get where you are. (Yeah, I know, you can get anything everywhere now. But not as good as where it started!)

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In North Georgia the orchard we visited made fried pies.  Now, that is a regional dish that could be served.  We all had samples.  Dee-lish.

Home-made is roll out a biscuit size lump of dough into a circle, put apple pie filling on one half, fold over, seal the edges with a fork, then fry in the frying pan.

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Innkeep wrote:

In North Georgia the orchard we visited made fried pies.  Now, that is a regional dish that could be served.  We all had samples.  Dee-lish.

Home-made is roll out a biscuit size lump of dough into a circle, put apple pie filling on one half, fold over, seal the edges with a fork, then fry in the frying pan.

 

OMG I got to go back there!

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Regional food is a tough one. For my verrrry broad area, I suppose butter tarts would be one. And perhaps beaver tails. Neither would I serve as a breakfast starter. Maple danishes, perhaps.

Regionality aside, I've been making date squares as the baked good on the sideboard fairly often this year and I'm amazed how well they go over. Loads of recipe requests. However, these aren't your grandma's date squares -- they've got slivered almonds and toffee bits in the crust and espresso powder in with the dates.

Sweet scones, glazed lemon loaf and cherry torte are also very popular but not unique to my area.

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I enjoy making the danish from crescent roll dough (recipe on here somewhere).  My guests always seem to like them.  If I was braver, I'd try making cinnamon rolls, but I don't like any I've tried that use short cuts.  It's mostly muffins that I bake in batches and thaw as needed.

Thinking of recipes already posted here, I think I'll try more of those jello and yogurt jigglers this year.

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Innkeep wrote:

Thinking of recipes already posted here, I think I'll try more of those jello and yogurt jigglers this year.

Sugar Bear convinced me to not use jello any longer! Go to my blog and look at the recipe section for 'panna cotta'. You can use food coloring/juice if you want colorful ones. Easy peasy.

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Innkeep wrote:

I enjoy making the danish from crescent roll dough (recipe on here somewhere).  My guests always seem to like them.  If I was braver, I'd try making cinnamon rolls, but I don't like any I've tried that use short cuts.  It's mostly muffins that I bake in batches and thaw as needed.

Thinking of recipes already posted here, I think I'll try more of those jello and yogurt jigglers this year.

I made the danish from crescent rolls yesterday (with blueberries) and my guests still haven't stopped raving about it. It's a regular on my menu here. In the summer I use blackberries and/or blueberries from our property.

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Cinnamon rolls (Cinnabon style). 

Nothing new to anybody, but always a crowd pleaser, though if it's a starter they'd need to be smaller than Cinnabons. 

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Arks wrote:

Cinnamon rolls (Cinnabon style). 

Nothing new to anybody, but always a crowd pleaser, though if it's a starter they'd need to be smaller than Cinnabons. 

I saw a guy at the airport eating one. At first I said, Oh that looks good...then I saw him still eating it like a half hour later, and I figured I might pass him a tums on the plane after we took off!

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