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Lea Ann's picture
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10/11/2013

Ok guys, new question. Locks for doors, what are you doing. The majority of our doors have glass door knobs. 

Thanks

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05/30/2008

We have historic fancy brass door knobs.  We put in deadbolts on the guest rooms.  Keyless entry with a keypad on the front door was definitely the way to go!  We have a second deadbolt for the front door as well.  Our second house had the keypad with a lever entry so it was locked when a guest was inside and closed the door.  The main house did not have the room to install the lever door handle with keypad (old historic door knob there, too).

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seashanty's picture
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06/02/2008

 we had glass doorknobs with old fashioned latch keys. people liked the latch keys but some of them fit in all the key holes although they were supposed to vary slightly!  also, someone leaving would turn and lock their door, effectively locking their travel partner in the room because we never had enough keys to have one inside, one out, one for the innkeeper.  we had planned to install deadbolts above the old glass knobs ... i left before that was accomplished. 

Madeleine's picture
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09/29/2011

Interior doors? Do you want to keep the glass doorknobs? (Please say yes!)

Install deadbolts over the doorknobs.

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Arks's picture
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05/22/2010

I feel the glass doorknobs are a historic part of the building that should remain in place. Any good woodworker can easily fill in deadbolt holes and re-paint the doors if a future owner wants to convert the place back to a private historic residence.

As Copperhead mentioned, the keyless deadbolts are really nice, because you don't have to worry with people carrying off or losing your keys, or copying them. Also, each person in the room can know the code so you don't have to give out multiple keys. You give guests a 4-digit code to unlock their door, and it's easy to change the code when they leave.

The deadbolts are available in a variety of finishes and cost about $100, which isn't a lot more than you'd be paying for keyed deadbolts. The ones for my place are wireless so I can delete old entry codes and program new ones from my computer, so they cost a little more than the manual ones.

As you see from the photo below, they can also be operated with a key, so you can still open the door if the keypad fails (like if the battery runs down...but they last about 2 years). You don't give the key to the guests. It's just for you.

 

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Joined:
06/24/2008

Each guest room has regular keyed house type door locks, the front door has keyless entry system. 

The glass door knobs are beautiful but not practical for a B&B unless you choose to install a deadbolt to go along with it (they make the keyless entry type too) which then requires further damaging the doors. 

Breakfast Diva's picture
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05/26/2009

Guest door handles have no locks, they all have deadbolts with keys. Front main door has deadbolt and keyless pad. I only give out the code for late arrivals. So, each room has 2 keys...one for the front door and one for their room.

Generic's picture
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02/24/2011

We currently have latch locks. We want to move to programmed keycode door handles, eventually.

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gillumhouse's picture
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05/22/2008

We installed dead bolt locks on all guestroom doors. They have to turn the key and turn the knob at the same time to enter a locked room.

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