wifi range extender?

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seashanty's picture
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06/02/2008

 To allow guests to access the internet throughout your place, can you recommend a wifi range extender?  I had one years ago and am wondering what's the best now for an old building, around corners etc.  Thanks

seashanty's picture
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06/02/2008

 this sounds a lot more complex than it used to be. 

  maybe i should contact the geek squad, pay them to do a site visit.

Kay Nein's picture
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02/13/2012

This is a very timely conversation as we've been talking about getting an extender for years now.  But, after trying to read everyone's gobbledy-gook technical sling-slang, I think I'll stick with my weak signal and play dumb when someone says they can't log on in their bedroom.  It's worked so far... 

Breakfast Diva's picture
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05/26/2009

Our system finally got too complicated for me to really comprehend. We have 3 buildings that need to have excellent wi-fi and we had to put in a bridge and an accent point and more gobbly gook. I hired someone to come in and make it work. Worth every penny!

Madeleine's picture
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09/29/2011

Sorry. Unacceptable answer. Too many people rely on the WiFi.

It's like saying sometimes the a/c works and sometimes it doesn't.

It's a big peeve of mine if someone says they have it but then it only works well in one room.

The programming part is not easy that is true but you can hire people to do this.

You don't not fix something because you don't know how. You get help. Says me who went for years with screwy showers because dh didn't know what was wrong and refused to pay for a plumber.

Same dh who is grousing he has to pay someone to fix his car because we don't have a garage where he could do body work.

Sorry, side track. But this is a real peeve with me.

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Madeleine's picture
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09/29/2011

I agree with arks. We tried the range expander wirelessly and you lose so much signal thru every wall and around pipes, etc.

If you have access to the basement it's pretty easy. You need the cable and a small electric drill to make the hole in the floor. And some cup books or a big stapler to attach the cable to the joists so it doesn't droop. Better still, if you can run it along with your tv cable, or find where that was run before you don't need to drill anything.

We put a small side table over the hole in the floor but really, the cable takes up the whole hole.

 

Arks's picture
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05/22/2010

I've tried so many things: repeaters, extenders, even a little directional antenna thing that "beams" a stronger signal to the area where you need it. NONE of those worked for me.

Not as easy, but probably the best way to do this is to run a Cat 5 cable from your present Wi-Fi router to the location where you need a stronger signal, and install an additional router there. So you end up with 2 Wi-Fi networks, like MyHouse1 and MyHouse2 and tell guests to connect to which ever one has a stronger signal in their area.

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Generic's picture
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02/24/2011

Why a router and not a wifi access point? Are you actually routing the router? I assume you therefore know how to configure this to avoid IP address conflicts?

I agree that a wifi access point is definitely better than a repeater. But people forget two things... singles go "down" not up. And a giant direction antenna... helps Smiling But it also depends on what the wall is made of, etc.

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Highlands John's picture
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04/16/2010

That's what I have.

Netgear router at the back of the property, cable through the basement to an Netgear access point at the front.

No need to buy a 2nd router, you can get an access point for £25 and you only have one wifi network, all the same name.

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Arks's picture
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05/22/2010

Highlands John wrote:

That's what I have.

Netgear router at the back of the property, cable through the basement to an Netgear access point at the front.

No need to buy a 2nd router, you can get an access point for £25 and you only have one wifi network, all the same name.

That sounds like the way to go. I've never seen a Netgear access point at our Walmart (the only place in this little town that sells stuff like that). They only have routers for $25 or so and yes, additional routers get their own IP address so you have multiple network names.

Generic's picture
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02/24/2011

Netgear only makes them for businesses and it's too specialized for wallyworld. But many of the routers can be configured as wireless access points, if you know how. You likely need to go to someone like Neg... for a wireless AP. 

There are actually some really cheap APs out there, if you know how to configure them. Units like on Amazon. But the instructions that come with it really suck and you really have to know how to configure it. It's just easier to buy a higher end product that has real support in English than a cheap product that works but has no support and no instructions. 

Highlands John's picture
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Bought mine on ebay, easy to set up.

Generic's picture
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02/24/2011

I have to say that because eBay doesn't police their own listings, I've found that they have often times become useless. You want a wireless access point and the category is full of wifi networking cards, manuals and AC adapters. You want a car accessory and all you find our screen protectors. They have made their website useless for the average person.

Arks's picture
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05/22/2010

Jon Sable wrote:

Why a router and not a wifi access point? Are you actually routing the router? I assume you therefore know how to configure this to avoid IP address conflicts?

I've done it many times. Plug a cable into one of the router network ports and run it to another router.

I do know how to assign non-conflicting IP addresses, but every one I've ever done has handled that automatically. It's easy to pop into Walmart and pick up a cheap router for daisy chaining. If you (seashanty) don't know how, you'd have to get instructions from a computer store.

Generic's picture
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02/24/2011

You have been very lucky. You need to set up one of three configurations for this to work properly....

  1. use one router's DHCP (bootp) and let it control giving out addresses
  2. use different IP sets (one uses 192.168.0.x and another 192.168.1.x, etc) 
  3. set it to assign different IP addresses (so one is 192.168.1.50 to 192.168.1.69 and the next assigns 192.168.1.70 through 192.168.1.89)

I'll be honest, I've been dreaming of replacing my whole setup with Open-Mesh, so that I can leave the web unencrypted and require a login. But it's a project for another time.

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