Breakfasts of Yesteryore

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happykeeper's picture
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Over the years, our breakfasts have moved up the food chain and it is rare these days to find most of those old time favorites on our menu. So it was with great delight that I discovered a partial pack of maple bacon in the freezer. We are closed for a few days and it was my husband's birthday, so we had:

Pan-scrambled eggs with cheese and bacon. I started thinking about some of things we served in the early years.

WHAT'S NOT FOR BREAKFAST ANYMORE AT YOUR PLACE?

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Generic's picture
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Thinking about this, how many have tried physalis. (Sometimes called ground cherries, chinese lanterns and even cape gooseberry) Which is pretty common around here. We have guests pull them off dishes and leave them on the table like trash often enough. 

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Oddly enough I didn't see this one on the list, but did just now in my newsfeed on FB. (the link was useless but the link i posted is for the fruit, er sorta...)

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Breakfast Diva's picture
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ahhhhh...when eating this fruit, make double sure they have cleaned it properly. I've had a sticker stuck in my tongue before! No pleasant!

Breakfast Diva's picture
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When I first bought our b&b, I served fresh mango and papaya...two fruits I just love. Over and over, they came back on the tray! When I would buy these fruit in the market, the checker would ask me what they were! Yikes, I really WAS living in the country! I stopped buying them for the guests because they were just expensive here to have to throw away.

Things have changed, and now you see mango smoothies, and mango in foods all the time. But I still keep it kind of plain for the guests.

Here is a list of some exotic/weird fruits. I have never heard of a lot of these! I only got a score of 6 and I've tried exotic foods a lot. What score did you get?

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Breakfast Diva wrote:

Here is a list of some exotic/weird fruits. I have never heard of a lot of these! I only got a score of 6 and I've tried exotic foods a lot. What score did you get?

I have tried a few I did not know what they were, that people grew here and there. Tropical Queensland and even San Diego has some on the list that we grew up picking as kids.

Square Watermelon is the same discussion I had recently with guests who said Mason Jars should be square vs round. You may be able to stack them better but there is a reason they are round. Smiling

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I scored a 20, but I did have to look up a few because some names are interchangeable. Sometimes we get the Filipino name, sometimes the Chinese name, sometimes the pacifica name, etc.

Breakfast Diva's picture
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Wow! Impressive.

happykeeper's picture
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Not really. For example, someone has a Santol tree in their back yard and so it shows up at the farmer's market. Never heard of it, so I get some and give to the jam maker under the next tent. Come back in a week and they made some great jam with it. People plant these exotic things and eventually it crosses your path.

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happykeeper wrote:

Not really. For example, someone has a Santol tree in their back yard and so it shows up at the farmer's market. Never heard of it, so I get some and give to the jam maker under the next tent. Come back in a week and they made some great jam with it. People plant these exotic things and eventually it crosses your path.

Not if you live in Oregon where berries are king, but tropical fruits? Not gonna happen around here!

happykeeper's picture
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yeah- it's kind of specific to our location. OH if only we could grow blueberries!

Generic's picture
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I'm on 9 on that list, but you don't really "eat" buddha's hand, it's mostly for zesting or jam. It's a citron.

I cant be within feet of guava without it making me retch. I'm afraid the same might be true of durian. But I'm willing to try it in dish.

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2 that I've eaten, 2 that I've seen served but did not eat.

I think it would be fair to create a list of fruits of north America and Europe to see how many around the world have ever heard of them.

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Breakfast Diva's picture
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I'm a pretty adventurous eater. I'll try most anything once. DH on the other hand, no way!

I'm very curious out durian. I've seen it in Asia and Asian markets here in the states. But I don't want to buy a whole one just to try it. The stench is supposed to be horrendous. When I've been in Asia, the hotels have a notice saying that it's not allowed in the hotel!

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I wasn't a fan of ackee, either. Durian does smell bad so why eat it?

Everything I ate as a kid, except meat, came out of a box or a can or a jar. So, adventurous I am not. But, waaaay more adventurous than my birth family. 

So much so that when I brought home a bottle of garlic powder my mother threw it out. And she's better than my father!

My kids will try anything. Grandkids same way. So the chain is broken.

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I can relate to your experience as a kid. Veggies from a can, tv dinners, overcooked meats and I lived in a suburban town with no ethnic people and no ethnic restaurants. Oh, and no spice whatsoever. Pretty blah and plain Jane! Things started to change for me when my travel lust began in my 20s.

Traveling to different countries and regional areas of the U.S. opened up my taste buds.

You've broken your family's food chain! yes

Maybe someone out there can tell me what this stuff is. I was in Spain recently and went to one of the big town market with food stalls. This picture is of chorizo, but what the heck is it packed with? Some sort of lard/fat?

Madeleine's picture
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I grew up in NYC. Absolutely no excuse. Eye-wink

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Madeleine wrote:

I grew up in NYC. Absolutely no excuse. Eye-wink

HA! You're right! laugh

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Yup.... lard.

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Jon Sable wrote:

Yup.... lard.

Do they spice it with paprika or something? It's so orange.

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Breakfast Diva wrote:

Jon Sable wrote:

Yup.... lard.

Do they spice it with paprika or something? It's so orange.

From a person with a bell pepper allergy, which has paprika as the relative and been very ill many times,

YES!

Chorizo - Mexican, Spanish or Redneck (Johnsonville brat version) have TONS of paprika, it is not the last ingredient on the list.

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smells awful but tastes good - sort of like eating a skunk, you have to eat it outside in a  remote location

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gillumhouse's picture
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I have gotten into a groove it is either the egg bake with the English bread (the fresh baked each gets a loaf knocks their socks off) or the baked oatmeal with the red raspberries, blackberries, and blueberries. When I get winners, I go with the ain't broke axiom.And I really am not tired of making them.

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I find that I do not tire of what I serve. It is seasonal and always evolving. It's MANGO SEASON AND i HAVE ALREADY FROZEN 10 # FOR FUTURE MANGO COBBLERS that we often use for our dinner dessert. It's the bomb. My hubby begs for mango ginger pie at least a couple of times during the season, but you have to have them just ready- not too ripe- to hit a home run.

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happykeeper wrote:

I find that I do not tire of what I serve. It is seasonal and always evolving. It's MANGO SEASON AND i HAVE ALREADY FROZEN 10 # FOR FUTURE MANGO COBBLERS that we often use for our dinner dessert. It's the bomb. My hubby begs for mango ginger pie at least a couple of times during the season, but you have to have them just ready- not too ripe- to hit a home run.

10 pounds!! yes

and what ever else is left not cubed up can be made into a smoothie!

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Actually- I think we started with 25# of off grade ( You have to trim off a few spots- doesn't affect the flavor or texture) and got about 15 # of actual cubed mango.  It's called Golden Glow and it has no stringiness and smells divine.

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happykeeper wrote:

Actually- I think we started with 25# of off grade ( You have to trim off a few spots- doesn't affect the flavor or texture) and got about 15 # of actual cubed mango.  It's called Golden Glow and it has no stringiness and smells divine.

Ok everybody.  I have to confess that I had never looked a mango in the face until I became an innkeeper.  Around these parts, people refer to bell peppers as "mangos".  I had to consult you tube to figure out what to do with the first one I bought!

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You're not the only one. And the first time I tried to cut one I had mango soup. Had to google it to see what I was up against! Since then it is only mango from a jar.

There are thousands of foods I have never set eyes on.

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You are not the only one. I had to go to yutub to find out about star fruit, guava, and while I was at it checked out papaya and found out I had been looking at the wrong color to find a ripe one. Oh dragon fruit also. I led a sheltered life on the farm - exotic fruit was not on the trees.

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Oh my- dragon fruit season is here too! We buy these buy the case from our farming friends. The pink ones are usually the best, but they have a new variety of white that is sweet and has a little touch of lemon to it. The red are a bit earthy and they stain, but they are very pretty.

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happykeeper wrote:

Actually- I think we started with 25# of off grade ( You have to trim off a few spots- doesn't affect the flavor or texture) and got about 15 # of actual cubed mango.  It's called Golden Glow and it has no stringiness and smells divine.

OK everybody, I had never even looked a mango square in the face until I became an innkeeper.  Folks around here refer to bell peppers as "mangos".  I had to consult youtube to figure out what to do with one.

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I don't know if I should feel bad or lucky.  I serve most of what y'all have abandoned, and I've had compliments on it.  I do think the demographic has something to do with what goes over.  Many of my guests are first-time B&B visitors who are not here primarily as tourists.  They appreciate having someone else do the cooking and cleaning up.  

I found out early on that the few fancy things I tried didn't go over well e.g. rice casserole (cooked rice with OJ, added raisins, mushrooms, sour cream, etc.  I thought it tasted great), and bulk sausage cooked with spiced apples and onions.  So I steer clear of the true gourmet stuff blush

 

happykeeper's picture
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You should feel great! Some of the favorites we let go are the very things we can't wait to have when we come to stay with you! It really is about the demographic you serve and what those expectations are.

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happykeeper wrote:

You should feel great! Some of the favorites we let go are the very things we can't wait to have when we come to stay with you! It really is about the demographic you serve and what those expectations are.

Exactly - I would NOT want (nor expect) biscuits & gravy in Hawaii

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Wow. I look at your lists and I think... thankfully I don't have your clients.

I have raves over my fresh vegetable quiche. And it's not gluten free (we do make a GF version though, when needed). I make pancakes and French toast all the time and nope, not gluten free. I make a lovely dish that has two sunny side up eggs on it (we do offer over easy or scrambled as an option, but they are warned that it compromises the dish.)

I serve carbs. I serve gluten. I hardly even serve meat at all (probably my biggest request is vegetarian or no pork.) And I specifically tell low carb people that they are on their own, we don't do low carb breakfasts.

When people are GF we have GF items, but I don't think it is fair that guests don't get my usual breakfast because someone is GF. In fact, GF usually means that you need to compromise. When I make a GF quiche we vacuum seal individual portions for the future and keep them frozen. The same with GF crepes and blintzes, always ready if needed. (GF crepes and blintzes are usually also dairy free.) And I usually keep a few vegan GF toaster waffles around for emergencies.

On my list, I used to serve a flavour of French Toast that requires an ingredient that I can't get any more, so that's off the list. And this year because of the lack of limes, any dish that usually uses limes is off the list. I have to admit that we haven't served bagels and gravlax for breakfast in a LONG time though, but that's mostly because we make our own and it's not season, yet.

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One thing that is long since gone from our menu... ready made pork sausage links...it's not for breakfast anymore!

happykeeper's picture
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Oh I dono... it isn't all that different me thinks... We locally source much more than we used to.... so that has led to changes. We make all our breads, so we can use WW pastry flour for most of it. I have some great gluten free breads that are surprisingly great, one in particular that I can use for all and no one would even know it.

The carb and fat reductions are because our guests appreciate being able to get healthy meals when they travel. We use salad greens for breakfast, fresh compotes, and tons of fresh local fruit.

I miss the overnight orange french toast with 100% maple syrup and bacon, but like so many innkeepers, we eat what we serve, and it was either knock it off or pick out a pine box.

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"WHAT'S NOT FOR BREAKFAST ANYMORE AT YOUR PLACE?"

Quiche Lorraine

we have too many fruten-glee, vegetarian, i hate eggs, vegan and more guests at one sitting to even consider a breakfast that serves all.

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Simplifed...

Get large silicone muffin cups. Cut a tortilla into four pieces, using two of the triangles, overlapping the pointy edges in the centre, make the tortilla act as a crust. Pour quiche ingredients into muffin cups. Bake. Individual quiche.

Or skip the tortilla, break up some hash brown (or use grated potatoes), pour ingredients in and you have GF individual quiche. Make a few extra. Freeze in silicone cup. Remove cup when frozen and put in baggie and label "Annoying fad breakfast for someone who isn't really a Celiac"

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Jon Sable wrote:

Simplifed...

Get large silicone muffin cups. Cut a tortilla into four pieces, using two of the triangles, overlapping the pointy edges in the centre, make the tortilla act as a crust. Pour quiche ingredients into muffin cups. Bake. Individual quiche.

Or skip the tortilla, break up some hash brown (or use grated potatoes), pour ingredients in and you have GF individual quiche. Make a few extra. Freeze in silicone cup. Remove cup when frozen and put in baggie and label "Annoying fad breakfast for someone who isn't really a Celiac"

Uh no way, sorry.  Except the last part... Smiling

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There is always the crust "trick". You take frozen pie dough and grate it while still frozen. And then use the grated parts to make a crust inside of said muffin cup by pressing it in. Parbake it for a few minutes before use.

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Jon Sable wrote:

Simplifed...

Get large silicone muffin cups. Cut a tortilla into four pieces, using two of the triangles, overlapping the pointy edges in the centre, make the tortilla act as a crust. Pour quiche ingredients into muffin cups. Bake. Individual quiche.

Or skip the tortilla, break up some hash brown (or use grated potatoes), pour ingredients in and you have GF individual quiche. Make a few extra. Freeze in silicone cup. Remove cup when frozen and put in baggie and label "Annoying fad breakfast for someone who isn't really a Celiac"

Uh no way, sorry.  Except the last part... Smiling

gillumhouse's picture
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Haven't made bread pudding in ages. Made baked pineapple toast for the first time in ages last month when I had a BIG group.

happykeeper's picture
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Sounds great! These days, most every carb we use is a whole grain or a fresh fruit or vegetable. No more sweetbread french toast. The only pancake we serve, and it doesn't make it into rotation all the time, is whole grain buckwheat.

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All my bread is homemade. The one I seem to make most these days - after the egg bake w/English Muffin Bread - is the baked oatmeal. That gets rave reviews. I do not do pancakes much at all any more - my maple syrup provider stopped making it and I have not found another yet. Richter's is great stuff, but pricier than I would like. Plus I no longer have the time to go get it - it made for a nice day trip and avoinded the shipping charges.

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BTW, your breakfast for yourselves is what we serve our guests. 

happykeeper's picture
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It's an old favorite- great comfort food

Madeleine's picture
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Egg Casseroles.

Baked French toast (even though this was a big hit years ago we haven't done it in yonks)

Muffins. (Except the ones we split and grill.)

Breakfast Diva's picture
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Eggs Florentine, Coddled Eggs (this was a biggie with the PO), Eggs Benedict, any kind of baked eggs which shows a whole yolk, quiche with a crust, weak coffee

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