How much should I budget?

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TheBeachHouse's picture
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what is a good estimate for a bathroom re-do?  

We are gutting and remaking a bathroom.  Moving the toilet.   No additional space or wall movement.  We are purchasing the shower, sink and flooring ourselves.  I think his estimate is high.   Any ballpark estimates?

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Breakfast Diva's picture
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I would rethink if it's worth sinking (pun intended) all that money into a bathroom that's in a guest room which already has a high occupancy rate. Unless you're going to make it into a spa bathroom or add on sq ft.  the return on your investment will take many years to recover. Personally, I would do an update, but keep it within just a few thousand dollars. If it's not going to put more heads in beds I would just do a refresh rather than a redo.

Will this reno make the room rent more often? Do you have pictures of bathrooms on your website? 

TheBeachHouse's picture
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Breakfast Diva wrote:

I would rethink if it's worth sinking (pun intended) all that money into a bathroom that's in a guest room which already has a high occupancy rate. Unless you're going to make it into a spa bathroom or add on sq ft.  the return on your investment will take many years to recover. Personally, I would do an update, but keep it within just a few thousand dollars. If it's not going to put more heads in beds I would just do a refresh rather than a redo.

Will this reno make the room rent more often? Do you have pictures of bathrooms on your website? 

 

good advice.   we've had comments that the shower in this room is 'claustrophobic.'  And it is.  We decided to replace it with one that isn't so close and dark.   What we don't HAVE to do, is move the toilet.   But it is in such a stupid place.    It offends my design sensibility.  Smiling

But again, your point is well made.  Maybe the toilet can sit where it is and we just do the shower and sink upgrade.

(We have already replaced 4 of the 6 sinks in the house.  They were all so old and tired that they made the rooms look dirty.   Of the two left, one is a full on antique (marble) and will stay and the other is this one.  Our most expensive room.)

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I would estimate $5K also for someone else to do the work.  Demo work is usually costly (we found...because no one wants to do it). Sad   You'll have to put concrete board on the shower wall, of course.  Also, a tiled shower will cost more than one of the pre-fab units, especially since you also have to have a custom glass door installed and the cost on that varies depending on the quality of that part of the project. Since the shower is on the top floor be sure that the shower pan is installed correctly so you don't have any leaks.  It's worth the extra money to install a quality shower floor membrane if you're putting in a tile floor. You can save some coin if you find a nice sink and toilet on sale.

Good luck!!

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Doors on a shower are much better protection for water on the floor.  I had one separate shower in my second house(others with glass doors) with just a liner & curtain & had more problems with water.  People just aren't always the best with making sure that a curtain is in the right place.  No problem with doors.

And, I definitely preferred cleaning the doors (which had little build-up because you're cleaning them every day in a well maintained B&B) to changing out the curtain liner between each guest (even with the easiest of shower curtain hooks).

Morticia's picture
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I hate changing the shower curtain in my own bathroom once/week! We had to remove the glass door because it was installed wrong and there was mold under the frame. Otherwise I wouldn't have gone to the curtain.

And, yes, Gomez cleans the guest showers everyday so there's little chance for any buildup. When it's less busy he gets into the track with a toothbrush. Otherwise, he wipes it out with a cloth.

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New door designs are much easier to clean.  This is what I learned from looking at new home construction recently!  Wish I'd spent a few bucks more on my glass enclosure when we did our own master bath here.  It's always worth thinking through.  

But I totally get it that you have to deal with your own budget!  We renovated (and installed) 5 bathrooms after we bought this house.  Yikes!

Morticia's picture
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The frameless doors are beautiful!

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We built a doorless shower for ourselves. They are great. I'm a great believer in glass shower doors. Coat them with Rain-X or other material. Try not to allow bar soap, though, because the talc that makes the bar is what causes soap scum, without it, it's just a wipe down with some of the blue stuff to clean the door.

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Rain-X is a GREAT tip!  We've used that on all of our shower doors and it really does work.  Forgot that dh had done that until you mentioned it.  Thx!

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Yes, they're on my wish list.  Especially after the number of bathroom cleanings that I know have on my resume (which doesn't even come close to what you, and others here on this forum, have done).  smiley

gillumhouse's picture
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I did not put in glass shower doors - or any shower doors. I put up shower rods with a nylon liner inside and a vinyl curtain outside. I change the liner with each guest. It makes it so much easier to get in and out of the shower AND for cleaning, I have a 60 inch shower as well as a 48 inch. Both have a personal shower head as well as the regular shower head. Cleaning is easier because I spray the cleaner, scrub, and hose down with the personal shower.

Lee2014's picture
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   Glass doors may look nicer than a shower curtain but it ten times easier to clean and maintain than a door!

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Morticia's picture
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I have to disagree about the shower curtains vs glass doors. I bet it takes all of 30 seconds to wash the door. It takes a lot longer to take the curtains down and replace after every guest.

I've seen enough 'pink' or 'orange' curtains at nice B&B's to know that they are rarely cleaned or replaced.

Anon Inn's picture
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We get lime scale accumulation no matter what I do.  So it's the curtains here, know what you mean about keeping those nice though.  More of a challenge in the hot weather.  I have to custom hem mine for one of the rooms and that hem is a challenge.  Soaking in oxy helps but after a time - just has to be replaced and in the busy season new hems are not happening.  Just occurred to me I should make up a few in advance!  We have stall showers so even finding the right size is a trick here.  Natl. Ho spit ality has them by the doz so that will be the next source.  

Lee2014's picture
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  At my parent's place we have hard water with orange.  The Works tub and shower spray does wonders on everything including shower curtains.  At my parents we lay it down on the driveway, spray with water from hose,  spray it with The Works, let soak, scrub, hose down, and throw over fence or bush to dry.  At the inn we soak it in the washer over night, run washer, and then hang it over lawn furniture out back to dry or in dryer on no heat.  The rest of the time we just wash it regular in the washer.  We also used Basic H.

gillumhouse's picture
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That is why I use the nylon liner on the side that touches the guest. IT gets changed and washed. To each his own. I can replace liners for $10 any time, and do fairly often if needed or if i find a pretty one I like. The liner goers in the wash with sheets or towels. It works for me and that is the only one it has to work for - was also a lot cheaper than trying to put glass doors on a 60 inch shower.

Lee2014's picture
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  We do the plastic liner on the inside and cloth shower curtain on the outside.  To clean the shower or tub, move the cloth curtain to the middle and outside of the tub/shower to work around them.  That's way the cleaning stuff doesn't get on them as it does when they are up against the shower walls.

gillumhouse's picture
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I hate the feel of the "plastic" on me and that is why the nylon liner is on the inside. The vinyl curtain is just to catch any water that may spray through the nylon. I take the liner off the hooks as I take down the curtain and set it aside to clean the shower. Then I attach the clean liner to the hooks as I hang it back up. Takes 15 seconds to take down and maybe a minute to hang back up (mainly because I usually try to start from the wrong end of the liner). This is what I have been doing since 2006 when I got shower curtains. Prior to that, it was a hand-held shower in the claw-foot tub and no shower curtain.

Lee2014's picture
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   What kind of shower curtain's hooks do you use?  We have a wide variety of them of all different styles and shapes.

gillumhouse's picture
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Just regular hooks that go over the shower rod. I have the vinyl hooked on first and then the nylon so as I remove the hook from the rod, I take off the nylon and leave the vinyl. One set (Gillum) are gold-looking fans I think and the ones in the shared bath are a heavy chrome with a white knob that looks nice (at least I think it does). Both have been in use for a long time.

Lee2014's picture
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  Don't buy the metal ones!  They leave rust marks on the curtains holes.

Lee2014's picture
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  At one place I stayed the shower had two glass doors.  Poor design as stuff would drip down into a ditch that you could not get into....brown and black stuff laid in there.  Sorry, I'd rather wash curtains then have that situation at my b & b!

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that just means they arn't cleaning them properly - we have a steam thing that jets as well as your basic tooth brush and shower head - doesn't take much to keep on top. You may want to tell any UK guests that the curtain goes inside the tray as in the UK we just don't have them (not hotels, BB's or homes) its all glass. 

Lee2014's picture
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  Thanks for the warning!  We do have the curtains spread across the opening with the one inside the ledge and the other outside the ledge.  Is that enough of a hint for them?

gillumhouse's picture
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I have lights in my showers - ceilings are so high that I call the plumber to change the light bulb. We have a 60 inch shower in the shared bath to replace the claw-foot tub and a 48 inch in the created ensuite where the claw-foot now resides.

Morticia's picture
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We've done all the sinks we could as well. The ones we had were low end motel grade. There is one left that will require relocation which means taking down a wall, moving the plumbing, possibly moving the toilet and putting in a whole new floor. Luckily it's on the first floor so we can get at the pipes from the basement.

We don't know why there is a false wall but will find out this winter!

gillumhouse's picture
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We don't know why there is a false wall but will find out this winter!

To hide the body?

Morticia's picture
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gillumhouse wrote:

We don't know why there is a false wall but will find out this winter!

To hide the body?

It's been in there for almost 30 years at this point!

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Morticia wrote:

gillumhouse wrote:

We don't know why there is a false wall but will find out this winter!

To hide the body?

It's been in there for almost 30 years at this point!

   Better have the police and the local newspaper reporter on site at least when the wall comes down if you don't know why its there. wink  

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$10K for starters I would guess.

OnTheShore's picture
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The vent piping I am talking about is venting of the plumbing drain lines, not ventilation of the bathroom itself. So moving the toilet 2 feet laterally one way or the other will probably require opening up the wall behind the toilet as well as the floor in order to run a plumbing vent pipe. Of course if this is an old bathroom, it might not have had proper vent piping when it was built, so the new plumbing work you are doing now requires it to be brought up to current code (requiring vent piping for all three drains!).

There is also the problem of the floor joists -- which way they are running -- If you are moving the toilet in a direction parallel to the direction the joists run, that is probably not much of a problem; if your drain pipe from the new location has to cross the joists to get back to the main stack, that may require some re-structuring of the floor.

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Toilets are a nightmare to move - usually a good reason they are where they are. I won't move one unless its an absolute necessity.

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Agreed.  

A lot of planning goes into plumbing in order for everything to go down smoothlywink, not an easy task and may require more plumbing than you think to get the new location to tie into the old.  

Other issues that could come into play is the age of the house.  If existing electrical or plumbing is outdated you may want to make sure the work being done does not require any other updates to be in code.  

       I bring this up because a neighbor (home built in early '80's) just added a small addition to their home, all of the addition was added to the new code.  Upon final inspection by the county inspector, they were informed that the entire house had to be updated to have hard wired smoke detectors.   While it is a good idea, having it be mandatory was beyond the scope of the project budget. 

Morticia's picture
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Yes. All of that!

OnTheShore's picture
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How far are you moving the toilet? just an inch or three, or to the other side of the room? In either case it will require some degree of opening up the sub-floor, or tearing down and redoing (at least part of) the ceiling of the room below.  If additional vent piping is needed, then it will require opening up and re-doing the ceiling (or the floor of the room above), as well as the walls. What floor is this bathroom on? Are the rooms above or below it finished space, or unfinished basement or unfinished attic?

When you say "gutting" do you mean down to the studs, and thus needing new drywall, or are you leaving the existing wall and ceiling finishes in place (and just re-painting, -papering, or -tiling them)?

Any windows or doors being replaced? Cabinetry (sink vanity)?

Is there electrical work involved? light fixtures? GFCI protected outlets?

Morticia's picture
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Gutting, to me, meant out to the studs.

TheBeachHouse's picture
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Morticia wrote:

Gutting, to me, meant out to the studs.

 

We are removing the sink, shower, toilet, floors, lights, heat.   It will likely mean new walls and some new plumbing and electrical.  

TheBeachHouse's picture
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We aren't intending new drywall, but I wouldn't be surprised if it were needed.  Toilet moving about 2 feet.   Room is on the third floor above another guest room.   

Sink and cabinet are being replaced.  Also mirror, light fixture, heat pipes, floor.  Venting and window are already new.  

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See to me I would rather source my own stuff - found a ton of bargains on ebay and by generally shopping around and in sales which plumbers won't do - ie they go to their regular shops. Much more work but can be $1000's in savings. 

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See to me I would rather source my own stuff - found a ton of bargains on ebay and by generally shopping around and in sales which plumbers won't do - ie they go to their regular shops. Much more work but can be $1000's in savings. 

Morticia's picture
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You're hiring out the work? The plumbing is in place but moving toilet? Vent? Drains? 

Id guess $5k for someone else to do all the work. But I'm often low on my estimates.

Look on home advisor if you don't have someone to work with.

TheBeachHouse's picture
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Right.   He did suggest moving some heat pipes to get rid of the baseboard.  I liked that idea.  But the sink and shower will remain where they are.

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