Pricing a twin room

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The shape of one of my to-be guest rooms will only accommodate a daybed.  Even a normal twin bed would look weird due to the odd sharp angles in this room.  A daybed with a trundle won't work either.  

Sooo -- the room is furnished with a gorgeous mahogany Edwardian style daybed with an extra long (twin) mattress, two bedside tables with lamps, a beautiful tall 6-drawer chest of drawers, a french vanity/desk with a chair, and a comfortable upholstered chair with a small lamp table next to it and a wall-mounted flat screen TV. (Sounds like with all of this, one could get a larger bed in it -- but no.)  The room has a nice sized walk-in closet and a nice-sized ensuite bathroom and a big window with a pretty view.  This room is my sister's favorite room to stay in when she comes to visit. She says that when the bed is made in the morning, the room becomes more of a "den" where you can sit on the bed and get comfortable and do computer work or whatever, and not feel like you've been piled up "in bed" all day.   I'm hoping that a business traveler, traveling alone, might see it the same way. 

What percentage below the larger queen room rates would you charge for a room such as this?  

   

 

gillumhouse's picture
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The Spa/Massage idea is spot on. IF you get a local therapist, get a rider on THEIR insurance and you get a copy. Check with your lawyer AND  your insurance about the therapist being a contract worker.

The walk-in closet could be the dressing room.

 

BTW - I understand contending with doors & windows - for my rooms, add in fireplaces in each room. Entry door, 2 windows, a fireplace and a closet and under 1 window in each room is the electric baseboard heater.

 

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Seashanty asked me to post pics of my weird room so here they are.  

The only wall to "host" a bed:

The funky corner: 

The door issues: 

Lee2014's picture
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Aspiring Martha wrote:

    Can you knock out this whole wall out, from corner to corner?  Put a corner table in the right corner with the bed coming out from that corner at a slant.  Or will that door be in the way?  What is on the other side of that door/wall?  Can you widen it into that room?  From the photo it looks like a wide open space?   Just a thought, I'm not in construction so it might not work.

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How many inches from wall to wall, from the wall where the "bed" is at the moment to the wall opposite.

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TheBeachHouse's picture
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no wonder your sister loves it  

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Morticia's picture
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Ok, now see how you have all the furniture in there but no room for the bed! If you could take away the closet you could probably put the bed there. Measure it out to be sure because now you've got the entry door to consider

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Tough love moment heart

There is no such thing as a twin room at a bed and breakfast.

You were going to be an upscale inn originally, and now you mention a twin bed. There is no place at an inn for a twin bed, full stop. If it were me I would use it as a dedicated spa room, where folks can get their massage and/or spa treatments. I would throw the $ at the other rooms and consider this one last, you can make it a spa room easily enough until you decide to do something else.

You are starting from scratch, considering a twin room is an anathema. 

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ChrisandShelley's picture
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I think this is exactly what you should do. We would do it if we had a room. Shelley is also a massage therapist, but we just don't have the room for her massage table anywhere. That room seems perfect for it. Guests will pay extra to have a massage done onsite. They don' t have to put on make up or get dressed to go to an off site location. They can get their massage, then get back to their room for a nap. 

Between putting in a twin bed and making a massage room, you will do MUCH better doing the spa room. 

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What was involved in Shelley becoming a massage therapist? Docbones seems to think my hands are strong enough to do it.  Are really strong hands really a requirement?  I do have a weakened left thumb where a pair of scissors slipped and cut my extensor tendon.  (I can't be trusted with anything sharp -- I'm forever slicing something I didn't intend to.)

Docbones is also hedging now on doing his OMT here for liability reasons.  Bummer...

 

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Schools vary, you'll just have to check close to where you live. But I think EmptyNest has the right idea. We originally planned for Shelley to do onsite massages in the evening. I even had the webpage, packages set up and everything. But we realized with her cooking the big breakfasts that she does, refreshing rooms, making snacks for the afternoon, checking in guests, and all other things that innkeepers do, she just doesn't have the time nor the energy. She just wants to take the evening and relax. 

EmptyNest is also right about providing a table, sheets, and other massage stuff. If a massage therapist can come in and do a massage without the hassle of sheets or providing their own lotion and other equipment, they will take less for the massage, which you can pass the rest on to the guest. 

If you advertise it as not including tips, most guests will bring a little cash to give the therapist. I would also say that most guests who would stay at your B&B are probably a little on the affluent side, so they are willing to tip well. Providing a well equipped room with little hassle for a massage therapist will attract good therapists. 

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It takes a good year of training in a certified school to become a massage therapist...and it is big bucks as well. You would be better off to keep the room as it is and see if you can just find someone who will come in and do massages in that room for you. My massage therapist is the only one around here who will do on site massages. She is quite successful.

If you can put in a massage table for someone, that may lure them into doing it because most of them don't want to have to lug all their equipment around.

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from previous massages id say firm not hard but there is quite a bit of leaning over to be considered even with a proper table - think you can do a weeks course to be qualified doesn't take much.

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Typo there -- hubby said he does NOT think my hands are strong enough to be a massage therapist.  frown

Turns out we do have options with that room. We measured the closet.  It is 63.5 inches wide.  Not wide enough for a king but just barely wide enough for a queen (queens are 60" wide).  If we had a platform or shelving built at the head of the bed (18''-24" say) for C-paps or electronics or whatever,  that would leave about 3.5 feet of the length of the bed sticking out from the former closet.  If the bed is on wheels, it could be rolled out to change the linens and then rolled back in.  Carpet would have to go and be replaced with hardwood -- but I wanted to do that anyway. 

I could see it really being a romantic nook bed with sconces on the wall for reading and maybe have the widened opening draped with fabric and a valence across the top. It could be similar to the pic below.  I like the idea of wallpaper (but not THAT wallpaper)  inside too.  smiley

 

From inside the closet where one would be lying on the bed, the TV as it now hangs on the wall would be viewable.  An armoire could go kitty corner in the funky corner, the vanity where it is now and a chair or even loveseat where the daybed currently sits.  Hmmmm...

I wonder which use of the room would be the most profitable -- a spa or a queen room?  

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We were measuring a room for possibly putting a kind bed in there, looking at the space between the bed and the wall. You'll probably get several other opinions, but I think 18 inches is the bare minimum for room. More is better, of course, but 18 inches will give a medium sized person room to scoot sideways.

In my humble opinion, I'm voting for the spa room. I don't know what your market is in your location, but if a local place charges $60/hour, you could easily charge $70 to $80 for the convenience of onsite. I have paid that at a resort with no problem. If you supply all the equipment, you could get a massage therapist to take $50 of that, the rest is yours. It's another feather in your marketing cap. It makes for a great addition to packages. 

The massage therapist that we use (not onsite but within walking distance) gives us a free hour massage with every 5 or 6 people we send her. So that is an added bonus as well. Massages are not just for guests! 

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I think the 18" is a good number. Even for the making of the beds. Do we have that here? Not in every room. One tight squeeze has 12" nightstands (where there used to be none, gotta get creative!)

I think maybe the original beds were going to be doubles. Even the position of light fixtures over the beds indicates the beds were going to be smaller.

gillumhouse's picture
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personally, I would not like that. You need to be able to get in and out of the darn bed without crawling off the end of it.

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About 3.5 to 4 feet of the side of the bed would be accessible from the non-wall side.  But yeah -- the person on the wall side would have to crawl off the bottom of the bed. Not ideal, for sure. 

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Aspiring Martha wrote:

About 3.5 to 4 feet of the side of the bed would be accessible from the non-wall side.  But yeah -- the person on the wall side would have to crawl off the bottom of the bed. Not ideal, for sure. 

Don't do it if one person can't get out of the bed without crawling over the other. We deal with all kinds of crap at home, we don't want that on vacation!

And I am amazed at room photos I've seen where there is no head board, no night table, no lighting and one long side of the bed is against the wall. Dude! Pamper me!

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Queen room

Morticia's picture
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I love having the bed in the closet. As long as there is enough room to get in and out of the bed. No one wants to be waking someone up by crawling around or whacking a shin.(I wanted to do that in my own bedroom as we have a lot of extra closets where we can put our clothes. Never got around to it.)

We saw a room like that in an inn we looked at buying. It wasn't a walk in closet, tho, just a standard depth.

The saying is 'heads in beds' that's where your money is. But. Big but. 2-3 massages in one day is one room rental. Can you get that many massages? What's your cut?

And, as jb mentioned - you're getting all different opinions on that bed in the closet thing!

Hoping this comes out as a link - <

Innkeep's picture
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I really don't think many of your guests would like that bed arrangement.  It looks like it would be difficult to get in the bed, and claustrophobic.  Are there not a few walls you could knock out?

gillumhouse's picture
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It is a much longer course here. Too many neck muscles that will do a LOT of harm.

https://www.amtamassage.org/findamassage/credential.html 

seashanty's picture
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Nailed it

JBloggs wrote:

Tough love moment heart

There is no such thing as a twin room at a bed and breakfast.

You were going to be an upscale inn originally, and now you mention a twin bed. There is no place at an inn for a twin bed, full stop. If it were me I would use it as a dedicated spa room, where folks can get their massage and/or spa treatments. I would throw the $ at the other rooms and consider this one last, you can make it a spa room easily enough until you decide to do something else.

You are starting from scratch, considering a twin room is an anathema. 

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I LOVE, LOVE, LOVE the idea of a spa/massage area!  That would allow the room to continue to be an income-generating space with (perhaps) even less expense and work.  OMG -- why didn't I think of that?? And since docbones is an osteopathic physician and does osteopathic manipulation treatment for his patients when they need it/ask for it -- I could imagine him making this treatment available as a value-added service for our guests if they request it.  

I was a little bit downhearted as I thought about my weird room -- but now I am totally jazzed!  It may be the best room in the house.  I just called docbones and ran the idea by him.  He is all for it!  For those who haven't heard of OMT - here is a little description of it: 

http://www.osteopathic.org/osteopathic-health/treatment/Pages/default.aspx

(Sitting areas, library, eating areas are great ideas too, but I already have all of those covered  smiley ) 

Morticia's picture
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We have friends who turned one guest room into a massage room. With the attached bath it was an excellent use of the space. She's a masseuse and he does reiki so they use the room a lot.

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I was thinking I'd hire someone to come in (and work a deal for free massages for the innkeeper?)  But I wonder what's involved in becoming a masseuse. If I did it myself, that could be a good income generator.   Hmmmm....

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Think the spa thing through thoroughly - we originally had it setup with local massage therapists who would come and do in-room massages for our guests as a nice add-on for them.  We were advised by others on another forum that the guest should pay the masseuse directly so that it was on their insurance and had nothing to do with us in case anyone was harmed.  However, the guests would call me and ask lots of questions and ask me to book it for them.  I then would try to schedule it for them and many times the therapist was already busy and I'd have to get back to the guest.  I wasn't making any money on it but I was doing lots of calling/planning for it.  Then tried to have guests just call the massage therapist themselves and work it out.  However, often they forgot to tell me that they had booked someone -- this became a problem because our house is always locked.  So they'd expect me to be here to let the masseuse in show them to their room.  Lots of work for little money unless your doing the massages yourself.

Could be good for you but just work out the logistics in your mind before moving forward and if you want the added work/time suck of managing massage appointments.

Morticia's picture
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Consider what your time is worth. How much of it do you want to spend? Check locally to see if you can get someone to come in and how much they charge.

You could build packages around this once you have reliable sources. Couples massage is a thing I've heard.

We tried it here but our rooms are too small for the massage table. One guest arranged for a massage and I found the table set up in the living room. Um. No. That doesn't work!

 

Morticia's picture
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JBloggs wrote:

 

You are starting from scratch, considering a twin room is an anathema. 

Have to agree that a single twin bed in a room won't fly.

You might get calls from students, but most guests in your target market want a queen or bigger.

Don't agree that twin beds, plural, can't be used as guests will book rooms with two twin beds where they won't book just the one. 

You have to pick a market. Do you want couples only? Go for bigger beds. If you want families or friends traveling together offer options in rooms that can have two beds. But know that if a guy calls and you tell him there are two beds he won't book.

You can use this room as a den or library or, like jb says, a spa room.

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If we follow the idea that twin rooms don't sell or don't contribute to your overall marketing, let's consider how else to use the room.

So far, suggestions for a spa room or a library.

I suggest a sitting room, common room, or even breakfast room.   Another place to relax with others outside of your bedroom.   Maybe a coffee, refrigerator, microwave set up for guests to use in the evening or before breakfast.  

And I love the library idea.  we have mini libraries on both the second and third floors filled with beach books and best sellers.

Morticia's picture
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Me, I love a library!

We looked at a place that was more like an old timey hotel or boardinghouse. The one room with the bath across the hall would have made a perfect library and given us an extra bathroom for events.

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    How big is that window?  Can you put a bed in front of it?  Then they can admire the view from the bed.  I have seen pictures on websites where B&Bs have done this with poster beds or canopies. I also seen where the bed is in the middle of the room.  This one was a canopy with curtains all around and tied back to reveal the bed.  Cute.  Not my first choices but if it means getting a bigger bed.  How about having a bed coming out of a corner so its not on a wall?  (kitty cornered) 

    Three of our rooms have walk-in closets.  The guests admire them but besides hanging their few items, its not used.  We put a chair in one for quiet mediation, etc. (need to fill the space!)  One yearly family reunion, one of the husbands, use the drawers and shelves to unpack his suitcase and his wife use the dresser in the room, but they are here for a week.  The other time two little girls used it for their nursery for all their dolls!  They pulled the drawer halfway out and put extra pillows, blankets, and towels inside.  It was so cute!  I made the dolls beds up every morning as well!!!!!wink

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Agree with everyone on trying to remove closest and get queen bed in there, or you'll likely have this room sitting empty.  Even as a business traveller covering 4 states I would never have booked a twin, In fact most times took a king if it was available.  As another post showed, people want kings first, then queens.

gillumhouse's picture
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Getting rid of the walk-in closet was my thought - add and armoire to replace it as closet

seashanty's picture
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Would you be comfortable posting a couple pictures so that folks here could see and offer possible suggestions for room configuration?  

I realize it's not what you asked for ... 

Morticia's picture
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I know it's easy to rent a double twin room, but not sure about the single. However, you're asking about prices, so I'd put this one $20 lower than the queen and really talk it up.

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I wouldn't rent a twin bed room. Twin beds aren't really suited for adults...at least that is my opinion. If you are serious about turning your place into a B & B, I would get rid of some of the furniture and make the walk in smaller. You don't need a walk in for a B & B guest...then you should get a queen in there.

Breakfast Diva's picture
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Sounds like that room has too much furniture. With a walk in closet you can get rid of the chest of drawers. It may be great for your sister to sleep in, but not for a guest. My suggestion would be to get rid of some of the furniture and get a bigger bed. You don't want to create an 'orphan' room when it could be making more revenue as a double.

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Most rooms are priced assuming double occupancy, so I agree a discount is in order.  But other things count.   Bathroom, view, noise level.   I would not say 50%.   Maybe a round number based on a percentage.

seashanty's picture
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No idea. It really does sound like a bigger bed could fit. I can easily sleep in a twin but I've been spoiled

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Yeah, I know.  The two walls that are long enough for a bed don't have a normal 90 degree corner.  The corner is more like 45 degrees.  So the foot of a regular length bed bumps into the angled wall.  The other walls won't work because of the position of doors - closet, bathroom, hallway...

I hear ya on the "spoilage". Me too. 

Innkeep's picture
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B&B travelers don't necessarily need large walk-in closets.  Is the configuration of the room such that you could get some usable room space by taking away some of the closet space?

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Yes, i could move the closet to the funky corner and that would open up an area for a larger bed.  Hmmmmm...

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cos if you had a joiner put one in the funky corner you can make it look normal at the front and a bit bendy at the back if you see what I mean? can run with the shape of the wall.

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