Gonna Be Office

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gillumhouse's picture
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This area is half of my porch and was Himself's workshop. I am hoping before Spring my daughter (my handyman) can come in with her fella and finish the insulation and put up the wallboard. What you see as remaining (not yet torn down) walls is the paneling that himself painted. (Wish we had done it when we got the house.)

This is facing the door that leads to the front porch from my "new office". It is after I cleaned up a lot of crap.

The before of new office

As you can see, they put the paneling over the outside wall of the house - and there is NO insulation under those boards.

The next 2 photos are the left & right side of the wall under the windows at the front of the house. All the torn down paneling was done by the electrician (with my approval) to make it easier to install wiring and the boxes for lights, switches, and outlets.

right side under windows

Tomorrow I will be putting in pieces of insulation above and or below where the current insulation has shifted. Plugging cold air entry is the goal at the moment. Looking forward to when I can show a finished room.

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On the house wall that was paneled over -- what you can do there is run furring strips vertically every 16 inches.  If you used say, 1 by 2's or 1 by 3's,  that would give you a 3/4" depth where you could put 3/4" foam board between the furring strips.  Then I would drywall over that.  Do not put any plastic on that wall.  That is the outer wall for your house and you don't want a plastic vapor barrier on both the inside and on the outside or you'll trap moisture and have problems.

If you want more insulation you could use 2 by 4's which would give you 1 1/2 inches of depth for your foam.  But if it were me I would use 1 by 2's.

On the wall where you have the windows just insulate it good and staple on a poly vapor barrier.

I would sheetrock all the walls in that space. It's cheap, easy to install and goes on fast.  Taping that small a space wouldn't take long.  I think nice painted walls in there will have a better "feeling" to it than other materials.

 

 

 

 

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If you do fur out the house wall and if you already have electrical boxes set, they do make extensions to those boxes that will compensate for the extra thickness you added.  Your electrician can help you with that.  Shouldn't take more than 10 minutes a box to adjust for the change in depth.

gillumhouse's picture
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He already has the boxes set so he can bring them out if needed. My daughter has installed a LOT of drywall - she remodeled the owner's bathroom but had to leave the last of the taping to my son who is now in Finland. She also remodeled her apartment as well as the house she has in Iowa. Thank you for the info.

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Or, I thought that you mean drywall/gyprock. 

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JimBoone's picture
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That looks like fun to me.

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gillumhouse's picture
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I had a brain cramp after I posted this. tell me if you think it has merit or if I am off my rocker.

IF I put a layer of insulation in the space at the floor level in the wall where the house is - do you think that would stop air from coming up from the furnace room and under the porch? I also thought if that would work, to get the sheets of "styrofoam" (for want of a better word) insulation to put against the wall of the house as insulation and then the wallboard over that. Would that work to insulate and make the room nice - easier and cheaper than using the pink insulation?I want it to be warm (I will be using it as an office), but I do not want to spend a fortune since this is just step one to putting the house on the market.

JimBoone's picture
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If both sides of the old wall to the house are heated space I don’t see a great advantage of insulation, sheet rock should eliminate the drafts, if anything some fiberglass insulation in the furnace room ( fill any open space wall/ceiling area ) may do what you desire. Remember the next person may want it back to an open porch, I’d do only what benefits you now.

Generic's picture
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The pink styrofoam is put in places where you can't put real insulation. You then wallboard over it. We've done it on some of the outside walls in the house. Insulation is generally against outside walls to keep heat or cool in. You don't usually insulate between house layers other than sound and fire. It's a different type of insulation. We installed it all around the furnace room to keep the sound low. You also insulate behind heating elements, so that their heat reflects in.

One thing people often forget is to put in enough electrical plugs. The suggestion today is about every 2 meters (6 feet). Around here all our electric boxes are still metal, no plastic allowed.

gillumhouse's picture
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Generic wrote:

The pink styrofoam is put in places where you can't put real insulation. You then wallboard over it. We've done it on some of the outside walls in the house. Insulation is generally against outside walls to keep heat or cool in. You don't usually insulate between house layers other than sound and fire. It's a different type of insulation. We installed it all around the furnace room to keep the sound low. You also insulate behind heating elements, so that their heat reflects in.

One thing people often forget is to put in enough electrical plugs. The suggestion today is about every 2 meters (6 feet). Around here all our electric boxes are still metal, no plastic allowed.

The pink I was referring to is pink fiber insulation. this house was built in 1912 and there is no insulation just wood walls outside and lathe & plaster inside. This room was half of the front porch, there is nothing to keep the cold air from under the porch. My new office is essentially outside the house. I do not have a lot of space on that wall so from what you are saying, the stuff I am thinking about should work.

ALL the boxes that were just put in are metal. We do safe stuff here also. I will have 16 outlets in that room when done - each of the 4 boxes will have 4 outlets and they are 20 amp, not 15 so they can carry the load.

When we upgraded the elecrticity in this house in 1995 from 60 amp to 200, the electrician asked me if I wanted aluminum or copper wire. I told him I wanted the wire he would put in HIS house - of course copper! I knew it was asked because of costs but I also knew the difference of safety. I made clear the scope of THIS project with my friend this electrician when he said he had fixed something already out of friendship, that he usually just did what the job called for. I told him that while he was on the clock, if he found anything that could be a potential problem when I go to sell, it is to be fixed and included in the bill.

My light fixtures are going to be LED.

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Aluminum isn't allowed here anymore, almost everyone who had it installed was told by their insurance company to remove it. I know that plastic boxes are allowed in the south, but not here.

We have a few types of insulation. The pink rigid stuff is what we put against walls where we couldn't open them. Wall board over it. The pink fiberglass in areas like in your picture. The "blown in" pink stuff is only used for attics here. It's avoided for walls, instead now they use a spray foam, but it is a very precise application... and really needs a well trained tech to do it because if mixed improperly it can have a lot of off-gassing, which is dangerous.

gillumhouse's picture
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We have that god-awful pamelling in our bedroom and the former studio because they had insulation "blown-in"on the north wall. It is also in the attic - awful stuff and it ain't pink. Made things VERY messy when we had the ensuite created in 2006 - the walls came down on the north wall in that room (it was the bedroom of one of the brothers).

Not using anything expensive. Going to try my idea in the places that have already been opened to see how that works. Now to price wallboard vs drywall (aka sheetrock).

JimBoone's picture
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Sheet rock is usually not expensive and with tape and mud seals out drafts pretty good, heavy if hanging your self, finishing not really difficult, but I have learned a few tricks if you choose that route as a personal project. 

gillumhouse's picture
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I looked at prices of wallboard last night compared to sheet rock/drywall. It is NOT less expensive than drywall. I will just wait for my daughter to come. I was just wanting it to be done so I could get moving with things. Ain't gonna happen. Sigh.

Step 1 is the new office. Moving into it will clear out the current office so guests can use it (Step 2). That will also (moving into the new office) tell me what is happening with stuff that is now just tossed into the "living room/studio" which will be returned to living room status after #1 son takes the toy box to its new home - his house. (Step 3)

the 4-drawer filing cabinet that in in my bedroom will also go into the new office so Step 4 can get started - making my bedroom look like a bedroom rather than what it looks like now. THEN I can put the house on the market. It is the domino effect with each thing falling into place. That is the theory anyway.

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