A first for me Foot down

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Anon Inn's picture
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09/26/2011

The moment when two women are checking in (early, but that’s OK today), and one of them is holding a dog.  

Im sorry we don’t take dogs.  It’s stated clearly on our website.  Her friend made the reservation.  By phone.  The question didn’t come up.  Plus unhappy with stairs.

so I’m adding pets and stairs questions/statements to telephone bookings.  

I did stick to my policy of no pets in the inn.  “I’m afraid I’ll have to decline your reservation.” The friend found a different friend to take the dog overnight.  They’re one-nighters.  All is well.

PhineasSwann's picture
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09/25/2012

As someone tasked occasionally with speaking on the ADA rules involving service animals, notA has done a great job summarizing what type of dogs are covered. 

Others are correct. The only two questions you're allowed to ask are: 

  • Is the dog a service animal required because of a disability?
  • What work or task has the dog been trained to perform?

Note that you're not allowed to ask what the person's disability is. 

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Just had to pass on a wedding for a really sweet couple who very much wanted us to make an exception and allow their two (large) dogs in the Cottage. I was willing to let them be inside and immediately crated, but this was not acceptable for them. Passing on 4K + hurts a little, but after talking to some other wedding venues, most will not allow a dog even outdoors for liability reasons.

Have had someone bring a service animal before. The dog chewed the leg to an antique table. I think you can ask for papers to prove it, which is what we will request in the future. People who truly have a service animal will likely not take offense, because false "service animals" create a bad rap for the true, trained dogs and make it harder for them to get around in public without scrutiny.

Stick to your rules.

Generic's picture
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02/24/2011

Actually, you are legally allowed to charge for damages by a service animal... since service animals will never do any damage. 

I think in the US you are allowed to ask what the animal is trained to do, but you can't ask anything about the person, like what they do for the person. The animal has no such rights. 

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Hillbilly's picture
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10/22/2011

More and more people are calling their pets "Service animals".  If they call them this there is nothing you can do and you have to let them stay.  Its a shame that people are taking advantage of this. You can't even charge them a cleaning fee for them or extra money.

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Anon Inn's picture
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09/26/2011

She did not pull that fast one.  Strait up pet person.  They loved their breakfast this morning, chatted up a storm and said they'd be back.  All really was well.  Smiling

notAgrandma's picture
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07/07/2017

No, there is something you can do. It can be fairly obvious to spot a fake "service animal". They're straining at the leash & misbehaving, not focused on their owner. In the US, you are permitted to ask what tasks the animal is trained to perform. "Emotional support" is NOT a valid answer. If the animal detects seizures or panic attacks, that's another story. 

From the ADA website https://adata.org/publication/service-animals-booklet

Emotional support animals, comfort animals, and therapy dogs are not service animals under Title II and Title III of the ADA. Other species of animals, whether wild or domestic, trained or untrained, are not considered service animals either. The work or tasks performed by a service animal must be directly related to the individual’s disability. It does not matter if a person has a note from a doctor that states that the person has a disability and needs to have the animal for emotional support. A doctor’s letter does not turn an animal into a service animal.
Examples of animals that fit the ADA’s definition of “service animal” because they have been specifically trained to perform a task for the person with a disability:
· Guide Dog or Seeing Eye® Dog1 is a carefully trained dog that serves as a travel tool for persons who have severe visual impairments or are blind.
· Hearing or Signal Dog is a dog that has been trained to alert a person who has a significant hearing loss or is deaf when a sound occurs, such as a knock on the door.
· Psychiatric Service Dog is a dog that has been trained to perform tasks that assist individuals with disabilities to detect the onset of psychiatric episodes and lessen their effects. Tasks performed by psychiatric service animals may include reminding the handler to take medicine, providing safety checks or room searches, or turning on lights for persons with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, interrupting self-mutilation by persons with dissociative identity disorders, and keeping disoriented individuals from danger.
· SSigDOG (sensory signal dogs or social signal dog) is a dog trained to assist a person with autism. The dog alerts the handler to distracting repetitive movements common among those with autism, allowing the person to stop the movement (e.g., hand flapping).
· Seizure Response Dog is a dog trained to assist a person with a seizure disorder. How the dog serves the person depends on the person’s needs. The dog may stand guard over the person during a seizure or the dog may go for help. A few dogs have learned to predict a seizure and warn the person in advance to sit down or move to a safe place.
Under Title II and III of the ADA, service animals are limited to dogs. However, entities must make reasonable modifications in policies to allow individuals with disabilities to use miniature horses if they have been individually trained to do work or perform tasks for individuals with disabilities.

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Generic's picture
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02/24/2011

In this country, we have a right to see the animal's training certificate from an authorized trainer. That's right, you can get a certificate from anyone you want, but if the trainer isn't authorized for training service animals... the certificate has no value. And I can call the cops to give you a ticket too, because faking it is also illegal.

notAgrandma's picture
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07/07/2017

We have 1 room that can only be reached via an outside entrance. Guests snuck in their spaniel after check-in, but I caught them taking the dog out in the morning. The woman was distraught and swore she'd read on my website that we were dog-friendly. Without prompting, she paid me a $75 fee to clean the carpets, even tho the dog hadn't had any accidents during their single-night stay.

I'm glad you stuck to your policies! Some dogs are great travel companions, while others (like my skittish rescue dogs) would freak out in a new environment.

Morticia's picture
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05/22/2008

Good for sticking to your policies!

Too many people believe in 'asking forgiveness, instead of permission.' Except most don't even ask forgiveness.

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