Thanking a Long-Term Guest

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02/15/2017

We've had a guest that has had an extended stay - 2 weeks - while visiting family in the area and using our B&B as a "home-base". She will be leaving in a few days and I wondered if anyone has a suggestion of what would be a nice gesture or small token to thank her for choosing to stay with us and letting her know it was a pleasure having her at our B&B. (She paid a pretty penny for the 14 days so I'd like to do something!)

We've already had dinner and played cards with her during a fierce thunderstorm, and she is traveling by plane (so nothing like a large gift she has to carry...) She also lives out of state so I'm not sure a gift certificate would be an option...

I am planning to write a Thank You note, but if there are any other thoughts, they would be greatly appreciated!

 

seashanty's picture
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06/02/2008

Miss Sour Grapes here. Never received a gift for staying someplace for a month. Not really grumping just wow ... You guys are extraordinary. 

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02/15/2017

Well, Thanks seashanty, just trying to read each situation and determine what would be best. Like the one couple - first ever - that we had to knock on the door ten min after the check-out time to ask..."I'm sorry to disturb you, but I forget if you had requested the late check-out time?" (knowing they hadn't...)

Sleepy Guest Standing in the door in his underwear: "...oh, when is the late check-out time?"

Me: 11

Sleepy Guest Standing in the door in his underwear: "...ummm (looking back at his girlfriend in bed...) yeah, we're gonna need that"

Me: Ok, well it is an additional $50 and I'll need your cc to run it.

He went and got the card. They were out 30 min later. I'm happy because I know what's going on.

I say this because he got the "knock and the charge", we can be "meanies" when we have to, and because of all the guests before him who always push it over by a 10-15-30 min...you know, the ones who come down to breakfast and act like they are ready to leave, then at 20min after are still loading their car and getting extra coffee. This couple never came down for breakfast and were still sleeping.

This lady we gave the gift to was a widow, traveling alone, visiting locals who are family, (long term impact for us) and well, after two weeks, we got to know her...and she was nice...meeting all the other guests at the table each morning was a treat for someone who lives alone. She also left 30 min after check-out and we were chill - but only because we knew that's when she had to leave for her flight. So it was a small gesture, and it made her day. I don't want to be the grumpy innkeeper that herds guests in and out....all the time...LOL

seashanty's picture
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06/02/2008

I get it Northern Dreamer. And I say BRAVO to you and other innkeepers I know who go the extra mile.

I've been widowed since 2004 (young) and it has been brutal. My 32 day hosts knew I was widowed and alone and it was paintfully hard sometimes when dining since all around me seemed to be couples. Admittedly, I was very sensitive but I was asked to move from a nice little table by the window to one off in the corner since it was 'just me'. First time, I burst into tears and they retreated appalled. Second time I said 'No, thank you. I came to the breakfast room early to sit here.' Got the mean face in return. Next morning and thereafter I was greeted by a little tent card on my favorite table saying reserved. Most mornings I was finished breafkast before anyone sat at that table. ah well. 

At the big, round community table I was accused by a woman of being 'flirty'. Possibly. I thought I was just being friendly and I would say it was her husband/boyfriend who was flirty, not me. No matter. The rest of my stay if they were there (one week) I sat at a little table off to the side with a newspaper. Kind of a treat as I don't buy the paper.

This still happens. At restaurants I'm sometimes tempted to say I'm waiting for someone to join me so they don't seat me off in a corner or with my table against the service station. I am a very generous tipper, too, I understand they might be disappointed in serving just one so I go extra if the service is good. But I also rarely see a man alone seated off in a corner. (when you're alone all the time you observe a lot) I don't  make a fuss, sometimes I ask if there is another table for one, and I will also sit up at the counter. But I also won't return to a place when I'm treated this way. I have my favorite places to go where they treat me like a normal person.

Morticia's picture
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05/22/2008

I love that they retreated 'appalled.' As well they should!

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02/15/2017

Thanks for all the suggestions! I didn't feel she would be uncomfortable, which is why I wanted to do a bit more. She was an older lady and also a widow. I revisited what all she had talked about the last two weeks and ended up getting her a book by a local artist and photographer who highlighted our area together. That book, with a handwritten thank-you note blew her socks off!

Anon Inn's picture
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09/26/2011

An Innkeeper happy day yesterday. 

All three availabilities here were booked by anniversary guests.  One year, unknown # of years and 20 years.  All got a card and a complimentary bottle of wine ( I plan for this )  They were all the most happy people.  Enjoyed them all thoroughly! 

gillumhouse's picture
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05/22/2008

In the last month I ha a 46 year and a 1 year. I baked each of them a small heart-shaped cake.

Highlands John's picture
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04/16/2010

Getting something local is such a perfect idea, something she can't get at home.

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Anon Inn's picture
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09/26/2011

Perfect!  heart

notAgrandma's picture
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07/07/2017

A signature mug from your B&B so she can remember her wonderful stay!

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Your character is what you really are, while your reputation is merely what others think you are. - John Wooden

 

gillumhouse's picture
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05/22/2008

Best answer yet. It would be worth the postage to me to ship it. And when my current pipleliners leave - I guarantee each will have one of my mugs. Thank you for the slap up the side of the head to this DUH!

Morticia's picture
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05/22/2008

I have given small local gifts - Maple syrup, candy, etc. Along with the thank you note. What you want to avoid is making the guest feel awkward.

I like the idea of a future stay discount. As long as it's clear it's not every future stay. (Although we do that as well.)

gillumhouse's picture
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05/22/2008

You have her address, call a florist in her town and send a bouquet or a plant (to remind herof you as she waters it) with a note thank you for your stay. Does not have to be a big bouquet - 3 casrnations in a bud vase would do.

Anon Inn's picture
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09/26/2011

Handwritten thank you note is a lovely gesture.  

If another extended stay is likely perhaps a 10% off coupon?

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