Menus for a long term stay.

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TheBeachHouse's picture
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We are on day nine of a ten day stay and I have only repeated one egg dish.   Feeling pretty darned creative!     Might break my arm patting myself on the back.  

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The Markow House Gardens BnB's picture
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I put the same basics out every morning, buffet style, and it's quite a selection. If they want something special, with the exception of an omelet or  because of dietary restrictions they can request ahead, and pay extra. I will say I've had some fun cooking( without extra charges) for long term guests from China.I love to cook that style, and surprised them with "Hot Pot" for breakfast one morning. They were delighted; taking pictures and sending to their friends back home. Made me feel great.

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Morticia's picture
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I thought this morning would be a challenge as we had 2 of *the* most difficult countries to please in the dining room. Miracle of miracles, all 6 guests said, 'Whatever you're making is fine with us.' And they ate everything!

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Generic's picture
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Italy and Japan?

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Morticia's picture
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Generic wrote:

Italy and Japan?

Our experience is Asians eat anything and everything you put in front of them. And Italians (male) eat everything and (female) just want toast. Unless we're having sweets for breakfast. Altho, most just want the bread with nothing done to it, and a pot of jam.

So, no, not them.

Generic's picture
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Our experience... Germans want bread. French, Spanish and Italians want sweet.... but Italian women won't eat anything but sweet. And the French love dunking stuff in their coffee. Some Japanese guests have proven to be picky eaters, we have found.

Morticia's picture
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I can say that the one time we made a breakfast casserole with potatoes and tried to serve it to Germans, they absolutely refused to eat it (Make us something else!) and then they dented my car to show how much they disapproved of being served potatoes for breakfast!

I'm a lot older now and less apt to take that kind of colossal rudeness with a smile. McD's is across the street. Don't order the hash browns.

Generic's picture
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Dented your car? Seriously? I would have asked for their insurance to cover that.

Morticia's picture
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Generic wrote:

Dented your car? Seriously? I would have asked for their insurance to cover that.

I didn't realize they had hit it until they left.

Generic's picture
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I might have asked if they would like to have the repair charged to their credit card, or if they prefer for me to file a police report for vandalism.

Morticia's picture
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Generic wrote:

I might have asked if they would like to have the repair charged to their credit card, or if they prefer for me to file a police report for vandalism.

It was still dented years later when we traded it in for Gomez's new car.

ChrisandShelley's picture
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Shelley loves to have variety in her breakfasts and HATES repeating, but there have been a couple of lengthy stays where she had to get creative. She tried a couple of new things out (which are always awesome) then she just mixed up the regular menu to where it is the same dishes, but in different configurations. Happy campers!

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JimBoone's picture
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Just my silly comment, but do guests care if a breakfast is repeated? I'm a creature of habit I suppose, but I'd probably be happiest knowing what to expect each morning.

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TheBeachHouse's picture
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JimBoone wrote:

Just my silly comment, but do guests care if a breakfast is repeated? I'm a creature of habit I suppose, but I'd probably be happiest knowing what to expect each morning.

it varies.   Some love the fun of seeing what’s on the menu every morning.   Others eat cereal and toast and barely register that there is anything else offered.   

ChrisandShelley's picture
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I've found that they don't care. With the few long-termers we've had, they loved having a favorite dish again.

TheBeachHouse's picture
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ChrisandShelley wrote:

I've found that they don't care. With the few long-termers we've had, they loved having a favorite dish again.

i always ask.   If they are here for more than two days, I ask if they have any requests.    

Highlands John's picture
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That's deflating, when you go to all the effort of putting out a different menu every morning and they just order the same thing every day.

We have some guests who come back every year and I can tell you now what they're going to have for breakfast in 2020

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Tom
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At least in Scotland you can get haggis for breakfast and at one B&B on the coast near Arbroath, the innkeeper's daughter went there to get the famous smoked herring for breakfast.  Sorry that trip didn't take me to Loch Ness or we would have tried to stay with you.

Morticia's picture
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Highlands John wrote:

That's deflating, when you go to all the effort of putting out a different menu every morning and they just order the same thing every day.

We have some guests who come back every year and I can tell you now what they're going to have for breakfast in 2020

We had a long term stay from the UK. They liked the location, we were ok, the room was fine. The problem? No 'full English.' And no menu. And no options. They wanted what they wanted for breakfast and it didn't matter how tasty everything was, there was no choice. They really just wanted to tell us what to make.

They have never been back in spite of having said they planned to be in the area every year to visit grandchildren. I'm guessing they found a place that had a menu.

I totally understand that. I'm not a morning person and faced with a plate of unknown breakfast food I tend to hand it off to Gomez and eat a granola bar back in the room.

I really only want some yogurt and bacon. Maybe a French toast if it's not doused in syrup. But, unfortunately, I don't like going out for breakfast because I compare everything to what I can eat here! Gomez doesn't believe it, but he's really good at breakfast!

Highlands John's picture
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The Brits have a reputation abroad for wanting "British" food, that's why when you go to holiday destinations like  Benidorm, Mallorca, Albufeira etc there are British/Irish pubs and fish and chip shops. 

Personally I travel to try different things, still remember the hollowed out bread with the lobster soup in Maine.

And as I'm the breakfast cook I enjoy anything for breakfast that wasn't cooked by me.

Anon Inn's picture
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I've just finished a week of binge-watching The Hotel Inspector.  Every time Alex Polizzi was shown trying a breakfast it was.....eggs and bacon.  Every time.  

I was surprised to see this after the past few decades of culinary diversity.  But perhaps she was using the standard breakfast as a benchmark, or are inns/B&Bs required to do full English for a rating requirement?

 

gillumhouse's picture
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What I hear from the UK innkeepers is - THAT is what the guests want.

Anon Inn's picture
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Well, you know what to expect then.  On our trip to London then Ireland over a decade ago, we did tire of the standard breakfast sausage - rusk isn't a typical ingredient in American sausages.  I sometimes find now I miss it a bit.  Smiling

gillumhouse's picture
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I have thouroughly enjoyed my visits to the UK - but breakfast was boring.Yes, there was a menu - but the menu was components of a Full English. Every day, every where. I did stay at one that had salmon on the menu - you bet I took it!

Do they have the same breakfast EVERY day? Is there no  sense ofculinary adventure?

Morticia's picture
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JimBoone wrote:

Just my silly comment, but do guests care if a breakfast is repeated? I'm a creature of habit I suppose, but I'd probably be happiest knowing what to expect each morning.

I will ask if they care. Or, rather, I will say, 'Oops, we've reached the end of our repertoire, what would you like to see again? Here are some options...'

JimBoone's picture
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See I'm strange, the kid who took a fried egg sandwich for lunch everyday, through high school and at least the first 20 years of my working life, wouldn't mind a repeated item, course I'm more about bacon, eggs, sausage, grits, etc. than a pretty presentation.

Anon Inn's picture
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9 was my personal best.  Some repeats, as in sausage or eggs more than once, but served a  different way with different accompaniments each time.  Alternate sweet and savory.   

Tom
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Let's see ... if day 1 I present plates with eggs on plate at 12:00 position (top), sausage at 4:00 and potatoes at 7:00 and day 6 I swap egg and potato positions, would that come across as a different breakfast?  wink

I don't have more than 5 breakfasts in the repertoire ...

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Yay for YOU! I also take it as a personal challenge to not have any breakfast repeats for long-staying guests! Had a 14 day guest last year and nailed it!!!

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