CARDAMOM + FRENCH LAVENDER COLD BREWED COFFEE CONCENTRATE

Summary

Yield
Servings
Source

DAUPHIN KAFFEE Atelier

Prep time5 minutes
Recipe TypesDrink

Description

This summer we’re taking things a step further by creating a cold brew concentrate of this coffee more suitable for short drinks (think cold brewed cappuccinos, latte macchiatos and stronger Thai coffees, etc. You will no doubt note about cold-brewed coffee is the flavor profile of the final brew – it’s much, much, much lower in acidity. This is true almost regardless of the coffee used. Why you ask? The coffee never comes into contact with hot water thus the acidic compounds are pretty much left un-extracted in the grounds. Note too that when most hot coffee is cools rapidly a slightly bitter taste develops. The only two notable expectations that I’ve ever encountered to this “rule of thumb” were semi-wild Ethiopian Geisha varietal and Jamaica Blue Mountain Coffee.

Ingredients

2ccoarsely ground coffee
2Ttoasted cardamom pods
2tfrench lavender
2qfresh spring water

Instructions

  1. First, toast the cardamom pods. Here's how. Using a small, dry frying pan warm it on medium heat on the stove (do not use any oil). Add the 2 tablespoons of cardamom pods. Toast them for about three minutes and using a wooden spoon keep them moving in the pan. You don't have to constantly saute them, but just make sure they don't burn. The skin of the cardamom will turn lighter and the aroma will waft through your kitchen. Turn off the heat and let the pods cool to room temperature in a small bowl or dish.Next, place ground coffee, cardamom pods and French Lavender in a large container.
     
  2. Gradually add the 2 quarts of spring water. Stir gently to be sure all grounds are moistened. Cover with a layer of cheesecloth. Place is somewhere safe where it can remain undisturbed at room temperature for 24 hours.
     
  3. Remove the cheesecloth, invert it (clean side up) and use it to line a fine-mesh sieve set over a large pitcher or another clean pot/container.
     
  4. Pour coffee through cheeclothed sieve into pot/container/pitcher (do not stir).
     
  5. Discard the cheesecloth with solids.
     
  6. Line same sieve with a large coffee filter or paper towel and pour the coffee through sieve into jar. This is the final filtration so per patient. It may a little time for all of the coffee to drip through but trust me it will be worth the wait.
     
  7. When the filtration is complete do not stir or coffee because it will become cloudy.
     
  8. Pour into jars, a pitcher, anything covered then place the concentrate into the refrigerator to chill. This coffee concentrate will remain ready for use for up to 2 weeks if kept chilled in a closed container.
     
  9. Dilute the coffee 1 part coffee concentrate to 1 part cold water (strong flavour) up to 3 parts water (light flavour) over ice for a really great iced coffee.
     
  10. I personally prefer a dilution of 1:1 the addition of 1 part half & half and a tablespoon of sweetened condensed milk. It’s the Dauphin Kaffee version of Thai iced tea. Have a great summer
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coffee-concentrate.jpg22.43 KB
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Joined:
10/07/2008

Ooooh!

DauphinKaffee's picture
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Joined:
09/29/2013

It's almost like a strong cold espresso. The advantages are obvious when dealing with ice. Not melt dilution. So you can build "classic" hot espresso based drinks cold. I love this recipe and I'm happy to share it.

Anon Inn's picture
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Joined:
09/26/2011

I used to make the concentrate years ago.  So good and easy once made.  Never added a flavoring.  The cardamom sounds nice though. 

DauphinKaffee's picture
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Joined:
09/29/2013

Yeah we kind of played it safe with the cardamon (but it must be toasted otherwise the coffee will have an astringent quality) because it's a classic additive from the middle east - very traditional. The twist here was the addition of the French Lavender - wow that was unheard of. Bear in mind cloves, cinnamon even dried ginger are traditional proven additives to coffee so experiment in smaller scaled down batches. I'd love to hear some new combinations of aromatics with coffee. I am in fact a coffee dork - so let me know your experiments turn out. Have a great day.

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