A little context would help

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Tom

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Forum members enjoy anonymity - it allows candid discussions.
But there are many threads where it would help to have a little context. The recent "are you required" thread had folk saying "in my state" but they didn't say what state and their profile is blank.
Active participants could consider adding a little context to their profile, without necessarily giving up anonymity. Info like: State (or country). In city limits? Number of rooms. Long time in the business? That way the aspirings and newbies can make more sense out of the advice offered. These factors are part of what makes a difference in how you run an inn.
 

Alibi Ike

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Good point about aspirings not necessarily knowing what states have what requiements and wondering if they should even look at those states.
Part of what you're proposing makes sense, but it gets a little cludgy unless we put the info in particular posts. Or fill in our profiles. Anonymity is a good thing for a few of us. I know a couple of the innkeepers on here dealt with stalkers. For me, I had a raving lunatic call me on the phone and start screaming at me that I was cruel and destroying aspiring dreams by being so honest on the forum. So, no identifying info about me, I don't need that garbage.
But I still like the general camaraderie here.
 

JBloggs

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I concur.
Piecing the puzzle together sometimes gives ya a headache. I try to give info when speaking specifics, and as always please email me and I am happy to divulge.
I don't think anyone needs the who when and where if we share PITA stories. That is understood. There are some who have never ever and won't ever divulge information about who they are or where. So that is just the way it is. So, I guess I am saying you can ask when necessary I spose.

As I type this there are 5 registered users here and 10 NON registered, who are reading this.
 

white pine

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I concur.
Piecing the puzzle together sometimes gives ya a headache. I try to give info when speaking specifics, and as always please email me and I am happy to divulge.
I don't think anyone needs the who when and where if we share PITA stories. That is understood. There are some who have never ever and won't ever divulge information about who they are or where. So that is just the way it is. So, I guess I am saying you can ask when necessary I spose.

As I type this there are 5 registered users here and 10 NON registered, who are reading this..
I have often wondered when reading a response, how many rooms the responder has. It can make a big difference in the way things are done.
 

Joey Camb

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I don't think putting how many rooms you have and how long you have been in business affects your anonymity as you can't tell who a person is from that but I do appreciate there are a lot of weirdos out there. Plus if I was an aspiring I would want the truth than to be told it is all spring and roses and then it is too late when you find out it isn't for you. When I worked for the British version of the IRS I dealt with 100's of small business which were in financial dificulty and they were all in a mess because they hadn't done their homework (ie I was told I would get 50% off my business taxes for the first year by a man in a pub!) and I don't want to be harsh but if you are that stupid I don't want to say you deserve to fail but .... The trouble is in a lot of ways we are all too good at what we do and make it look effortless which makes outsiders think it is the fact we are trying not to cry with toothach while the toilet is exploding and being shouted at by a PITA and simulatniously worrying about the mortgage is not something everyone can do.
 

JBloggs

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What does help is to go and visit some innmates! "No innkeeper is an island"
Once you see them in their innvironment, then you can better understand where they are coming from. I know this is not possible most of the time, but if you can visit one inn per year, say, you would grasp so much more.
We still need to visit other inns, to help in the daily operation of our own. Yes, it is important. To think we never need to visit another inn is ludicrous. If this is our industry, we need to be devoted to keeping abreast of what is going on out there and how other inns operate.
Sure we can glean from the forum, but as mentioned, we don't always "get it." Walking in anothers shoes, so to speak, seeing where they are and how they deal with guests, etc in that environs...well that makes all the difference.
Part of our annual budget s/b to visit other B&B's. And...if you visit innmates you may find the stay is recipricated and you can just pay for the travel. :)
Innvites are open...come and see us here.
Maybe the anon inns to innvite the innmates (sheesh I am getting carries away with the INN prefixes) to their inns. Perhaps the anon innkeepers THINK they ave innvited, but they have not. Or perhaps they don't want any innkeeping fellowship inn person.
 

Morticia

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What does help is to go and visit some innmates! "No innkeeper is an island"
Once you see them in their innvironment, then you can better understand where they are coming from. I know this is not possible most of the time, but if you can visit one inn per year, say, you would grasp so much more.
We still need to visit other inns, to help in the daily operation of our own. Yes, it is important. To think we never need to visit another inn is ludicrous. If this is our industry, we need to be devoted to keeping abreast of what is going on out there and how other inns operate.
Sure we can glean from the forum, but as mentioned, we don't always "get it." Walking in anothers shoes, so to speak, seeing where they are and how they deal with guests, etc in that environs...well that makes all the difference.
Part of our annual budget s/b to visit other B&B's. And...if you visit innmates you may find the stay is recipricated and you can just pay for the travel. :)
Innvites are open...come and see us here.
Maybe the anon inns to innvite the innmates (sheesh I am getting carries away with the INN prefixes) to their inns. Perhaps the anon innkeepers THINK they ave innvited, but they have not. Or perhaps they don't want any innkeeping fellowship inn person..
It really does help to visit other B&B's for ideas. You can sort out your own style by watching how things are done by visiting friends from here or just staying at B&B's while traveling. I know I've mentioned some of these horrors before, but they are worth repeating for aspirings:
  • If you highlight your fireplaces as an added amenity, they had better be fireplaces and not an electronic picture of a fire with no heat;
  • Your guests don't care if you're leaving on vacation next week and are in the process of 'shutting down the building', they paid full price and they expect full services;
  • If you burn the breakfast, recook it, don't tell the guests to 'eat around the burnt parts';
  • Do not monopolize your guests' time with your sob story or the history of the house;
  • If it is snowing outside, saying you see no reason to ever turn the heat above 60 is NOT gracious hosting;
  • You may love your animals, but they absolutely do not belong in the dining room while guests are eating. Do not continually refer to the 4-legged mop at my feet as 'my precious' while it is attempting to pull food from my plate;
  • Try sleeping in your own rooms and note that the 500w parking lot light shines directly onto the bed ALL NIGHT LONG!
  • There is absolutely no reason a guest's breakfast should be cold when it is placed in front of them. If something distracted you, reheat the damned thing before serving it;
  • Those floor mats in the bathroom? If you're not going to wash them between guests, at least tell housekeeping to shake them out and vacuum them.
OTOH, I have had marvelous visits with innkeepers who totally GET customer service!
  • A full suite of amenities provided (especially useful as my luggage went one way and I the other);
  • Fully recognizable food for breakfast (not everyone appreciates everything laden with sauces);
  • A wonderful array of afternoon refreshments;
  • Appropriate, guest-controlled heating and cooling;
  • CLEAN accommodations.
 

JBloggs

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"on the other hand"
<can you tell I recently saw Fiddler on the roof?>
On the other hand, sometimes AFTER you get all of that background info (I am referring to the orig thread post here) you might want to put some on ignore when you see their inn and wonder aloud "WHAT THE HECK!" and you also say to yourself, they have been on this forum for how long, and still don't get it!? Still have no online reservations, still have BAD very bad photos on their website, still have a BAD very bad website... visit those websites and get TURNED OFF (and you know guests do as well)
>>>BEAT HEAD HERE
So take it for what its worth, nothing is concrete on this forum, nothing stays the same...we all have those posters/users here who we respect a bit more than others, those who we feel their innformation is more valuable to us - where we are and how we operate. So we can just pay attention to that...and as mentioned get out and visit an inn, this year! If it was wonderful, you get warm fuzzies emulate it, if it sucks and was a pit, you now know...
not many...of course, just the ocassional.
 

bbinnsitters

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That is why I wish that my opinion was a little more respected on this forum - to date I have either been a guest in or worked in over 100 B&B's in the past 20 years. I feel as if I've seen it all and I love sharing my knowledge.
 

muirford

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What does help is to go and visit some innmates! "No innkeeper is an island"
Once you see them in their innvironment, then you can better understand where they are coming from. I know this is not possible most of the time, but if you can visit one inn per year, say, you would grasp so much more.
We still need to visit other inns, to help in the daily operation of our own. Yes, it is important. To think we never need to visit another inn is ludicrous. If this is our industry, we need to be devoted to keeping abreast of what is going on out there and how other inns operate.
Sure we can glean from the forum, but as mentioned, we don't always "get it." Walking in anothers shoes, so to speak, seeing where they are and how they deal with guests, etc in that environs...well that makes all the difference.
Part of our annual budget s/b to visit other B&B's. And...if you visit innmates you may find the stay is recipricated and you can just pay for the travel. :)
Innvites are open...come and see us here.
Maybe the anon inns to innvite the innmates (sheesh I am getting carries away with the INN prefixes) to their inns. Perhaps the anon innkeepers THINK they ave innvited, but they have not. Or perhaps they don't want any innkeeping fellowship inn person..
It really does help to visit other B&B's for ideas. You can sort out your own style by watching how things are done by visiting friends from here or just staying at B&B's while traveling. I know I've mentioned some of these horrors before, but they are worth repeating for aspirings:
  • If you highlight your fireplaces as an added amenity, they had better be fireplaces and not an electronic picture of a fire with no heat;
  • Your guests don't care if you're leaving on vacation next week and are in the process of 'shutting down the building', they paid full price and they expect full services;
  • If you burn the breakfast, recook it, don't tell the guests to 'eat around the burnt parts';
  • Do not monopolize your guests' time with your sob story or the history of the house;
  • If it is snowing outside, saying you see no reason to ever turn the heat above 60 is NOT gracious hosting;
  • You may love your animals, but they absolutely do not belong in the dining room while guests are eating. Do not continually refer to the 4-legged mop at my feet as 'my precious' while it is attempting to pull food from my plate;
  • Try sleeping in your own rooms and note that the 500w parking lot light shines directly onto the bed ALL NIGHT LONG!
  • There is absolutely no reason a guest's breakfast should be cold when it is placed in front of them. If something distracted you, reheat the damned thing before serving it;
  • Those floor mats in the bathroom? If you're not going to wash them between guests, at least tell housekeeping to shake them out and vacuum them.
OTOH, I have had marvelous visits with innkeepers who totally GET customer service!
  • A full suite of amenities provided (especially useful as my luggage went one way and I the other);
  • Fully recognizable food for breakfast (not everyone appreciates everything laden with sauces);
  • A wonderful array of afternoon refreshments;
  • Appropriate, guest-controlled heating and cooling;
  • CLEAN accommodations.
.
Morticia said:
If it is snowing outside, saying you see no reason to ever turn the heat above 60 is NOT gracious hosting;
We just had a group of folks this weekend who have been getting away the first weekend of February for 14 years. They said ours was the first place where they felt the temperature was comfortable all weekend. Actually, at first they said it was warm, then they corrected themselves so we would know they weren't complaining. We don't set the heat particularly high - 67 degrees seems to work pretty well in the winter.
 

sandynn

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What does help is to go and visit some innmates! "No innkeeper is an island"
Once you see them in their innvironment, then you can better understand where they are coming from. I know this is not possible most of the time, but if you can visit one inn per year, say, you would grasp so much more.
We still need to visit other inns, to help in the daily operation of our own. Yes, it is important. To think we never need to visit another inn is ludicrous. If this is our industry, we need to be devoted to keeping abreast of what is going on out there and how other inns operate.
Sure we can glean from the forum, but as mentioned, we don't always "get it." Walking in anothers shoes, so to speak, seeing where they are and how they deal with guests, etc in that environs...well that makes all the difference.
Part of our annual budget s/b to visit other B&B's. And...if you visit innmates you may find the stay is recipricated and you can just pay for the travel. :)
Innvites are open...come and see us here.
Maybe the anon inns to innvite the innmates (sheesh I am getting carries away with the INN prefixes) to their inns. Perhaps the anon innkeepers THINK they ave innvited, but they have not. Or perhaps they don't want any innkeeping fellowship inn person..
It really does help to visit other B&B's for ideas. You can sort out your own style by watching how things are done by visiting friends from here or just staying at B&B's while traveling. I know I've mentioned some of these horrors before, but they are worth repeating for aspirings:
  • If you highlight your fireplaces as an added amenity, they had better be fireplaces and not an electronic picture of a fire with no heat;
  • Your guests don't care if you're leaving on vacation next week and are in the process of 'shutting down the building', they paid full price and they expect full services;
  • If you burn the breakfast, recook it, don't tell the guests to 'eat around the burnt parts';
  • Do not monopolize your guests' time with your sob story or the history of the house;
  • If it is snowing outside, saying you see no reason to ever turn the heat above 60 is NOT gracious hosting;
  • You may love your animals, but they absolutely do not belong in the dining room while guests are eating. Do not continually refer to the 4-legged mop at my feet as 'my precious' while it is attempting to pull food from my plate;
  • Try sleeping in your own rooms and note that the 500w parking lot light shines directly onto the bed ALL NIGHT LONG!
  • There is absolutely no reason a guest's breakfast should be cold when it is placed in front of them. If something distracted you, reheat the damned thing before serving it;
  • Those floor mats in the bathroom? If you're not going to wash them between guests, at least tell housekeeping to shake them out and vacuum them.
OTOH, I have had marvelous visits with innkeepers who totally GET customer service!
  • A full suite of amenities provided (especially useful as my luggage went one way and I the other);
  • Fully recognizable food for breakfast (not everyone appreciates everything laden with sauces);
  • A wonderful array of afternoon refreshments;
  • Appropriate, guest-controlled heating and cooling;
  • CLEAN accommodations.
.
Ok here is one. I have held this in a long as I could. I hope this is on one on here but check just in case.
If you have a picture on your web site with the toilet seat up you should get it off as soon as you can. I have seen several site like this.
One lady says she has been photographer for 20 years and has a bed and breakfast. She wanted to be put on a list to photograph others bed and breakfast and there are three pictures with the seat up on her site. One is a reflection in a mirror so you get to see it twice. It is like she is showcasing the toilet. I am not sure why anyone would hire her to photograph their inn. I saw another that has the seat up and the towels had been used. Also if your blankets are not straight by all means straighten them. This is so unprofessional looking. I really don't think people would take you serious. Ok I said these things because I think they need to be said. I am really not trying to be mean just honest.
 

Samster

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What does help is to go and visit some innmates! "No innkeeper is an island"
Once you see them in their innvironment, then you can better understand where they are coming from. I know this is not possible most of the time, but if you can visit one inn per year, say, you would grasp so much more.
We still need to visit other inns, to help in the daily operation of our own. Yes, it is important. To think we never need to visit another inn is ludicrous. If this is our industry, we need to be devoted to keeping abreast of what is going on out there and how other inns operate.
Sure we can glean from the forum, but as mentioned, we don't always "get it." Walking in anothers shoes, so to speak, seeing where they are and how they deal with guests, etc in that environs...well that makes all the difference.
Part of our annual budget s/b to visit other B&B's. And...if you visit innmates you may find the stay is recipricated and you can just pay for the travel. :)
Innvites are open...come and see us here.
Maybe the anon inns to innvite the innmates (sheesh I am getting carries away with the INN prefixes) to their inns. Perhaps the anon innkeepers THINK they ave innvited, but they have not. Or perhaps they don't want any innkeeping fellowship inn person..
It really does help to visit other B&B's for ideas. You can sort out your own style by watching how things are done by visiting friends from here or just staying at B&B's while traveling. I know I've mentioned some of these horrors before, but they are worth repeating for aspirings:
  • If you highlight your fireplaces as an added amenity, they had better be fireplaces and not an electronic picture of a fire with no heat;
  • Your guests don't care if you're leaving on vacation next week and are in the process of 'shutting down the building', they paid full price and they expect full services;
  • If you burn the breakfast, recook it, don't tell the guests to 'eat around the burnt parts';
  • Do not monopolize your guests' time with your sob story or the history of the house;
  • If it is snowing outside, saying you see no reason to ever turn the heat above 60 is NOT gracious hosting;
  • You may love your animals, but they absolutely do not belong in the dining room while guests are eating. Do not continually refer to the 4-legged mop at my feet as 'my precious' while it is attempting to pull food from my plate;
  • Try sleeping in your own rooms and note that the 500w parking lot light shines directly onto the bed ALL NIGHT LONG!
  • There is absolutely no reason a guest's breakfast should be cold when it is placed in front of them. If something distracted you, reheat the damned thing before serving it;
  • Those floor mats in the bathroom? If you're not going to wash them between guests, at least tell housekeeping to shake them out and vacuum them.
OTOH, I have had marvelous visits with innkeepers who totally GET customer service!
  • A full suite of amenities provided (especially useful as my luggage went one way and I the other);
  • Fully recognizable food for breakfast (not everyone appreciates everything laden with sauces);
  • A wonderful array of afternoon refreshments;
  • Appropriate, guest-controlled heating and cooling;
  • CLEAN accommodations.
.
Ok here is one. I have held this in a long as I could. I hope this is on one on here but check just in case.
If you have a picture on your web site with the toilet seat up you should get it off as soon as you can. I have seen several site like this.
One lady says she has been photographer for 20 years and has a bed and breakfast. She wanted to be put on a list to photograph others bed and breakfast and there are three pictures with the seat up on her site. One is a reflection in a mirror so you get to see it twice. It is like she is showcasing the toilet. I am not sure why anyone would hire her to photograph their inn. I saw another that has the seat up and the towels had been used. Also if your blankets are not straight by all means straighten them. This is so unprofessional looking. I really don't think people would take you serious. Ok I said these things because I think they need to be said. I am really not trying to be mean just honest.
.
I don't think you have a mean bone in your body! :) That is all excellent advice!
 

EmptyNest

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What does help is to go and visit some innmates! "No innkeeper is an island"
Once you see them in their innvironment, then you can better understand where they are coming from. I know this is not possible most of the time, but if you can visit one inn per year, say, you would grasp so much more.
We still need to visit other inns, to help in the daily operation of our own. Yes, it is important. To think we never need to visit another inn is ludicrous. If this is our industry, we need to be devoted to keeping abreast of what is going on out there and how other inns operate.
Sure we can glean from the forum, but as mentioned, we don't always "get it." Walking in anothers shoes, so to speak, seeing where they are and how they deal with guests, etc in that environs...well that makes all the difference.
Part of our annual budget s/b to visit other B&B's. And...if you visit innmates you may find the stay is recipricated and you can just pay for the travel. :)
Innvites are open...come and see us here.
Maybe the anon inns to innvite the innmates (sheesh I am getting carries away with the INN prefixes) to their inns. Perhaps the anon innkeepers THINK they ave innvited, but they have not. Or perhaps they don't want any innkeeping fellowship inn person..
It really does help to visit other B&B's for ideas. You can sort out your own style by watching how things are done by visiting friends from here or just staying at B&B's while traveling. I know I've mentioned some of these horrors before, but they are worth repeating for aspirings:
  • If you highlight your fireplaces as an added amenity, they had better be fireplaces and not an electronic picture of a fire with no heat;
  • Your guests don't care if you're leaving on vacation next week and are in the process of 'shutting down the building', they paid full price and they expect full services;
  • If you burn the breakfast, recook it, don't tell the guests to 'eat around the burnt parts';
  • Do not monopolize your guests' time with your sob story or the history of the house;
  • If it is snowing outside, saying you see no reason to ever turn the heat above 60 is NOT gracious hosting;
  • You may love your animals, but they absolutely do not belong in the dining room while guests are eating. Do not continually refer to the 4-legged mop at my feet as 'my precious' while it is attempting to pull food from my plate;
  • Try sleeping in your own rooms and note that the 500w parking lot light shines directly onto the bed ALL NIGHT LONG!
  • There is absolutely no reason a guest's breakfast should be cold when it is placed in front of them. If something distracted you, reheat the damned thing before serving it;
  • Those floor mats in the bathroom? If you're not going to wash them between guests, at least tell housekeeping to shake them out and vacuum them.
OTOH, I have had marvelous visits with innkeepers who totally GET customer service!
  • A full suite of amenities provided (especially useful as my luggage went one way and I the other);
  • Fully recognizable food for breakfast (not everyone appreciates everything laden with sauces);
  • A wonderful array of afternoon refreshments;
  • Appropriate, guest-controlled heating and cooling;
  • CLEAN accommodations.
.
Ok here is one. I have held this in a long as I could. I hope this is on one on here but check just in case.
If you have a picture on your web site with the toilet seat up you should get it off as soon as you can. I have seen several site like this.
One lady says she has been photographer for 20 years and has a bed and breakfast. She wanted to be put on a list to photograph others bed and breakfast and there are three pictures with the seat up on her site. One is a reflection in a mirror so you get to see it twice. It is like she is showcasing the toilet. I am not sure why anyone would hire her to photograph their inn. I saw another that has the seat up and the towels had been used. Also if your blankets are not straight by all means straighten them. This is so unprofessional looking. I really don't think people would take you serious. Ok I said these things because I think they need to be said. I am really not trying to be mean just honest.
.
I tell people about their toilet seats all the time :) I even tell many of my friend who have rental cabins. One good friend had some really upscale timber frame cabins..the best...and she gave me photos for her website and I told her...sorry...my pet peev....toilet seat up...no photo of it on the site. She never gave it a thought before.
 

JBloggs

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What does help is to go and visit some innmates! "No innkeeper is an island"
Once you see them in their innvironment, then you can better understand where they are coming from. I know this is not possible most of the time, but if you can visit one inn per year, say, you would grasp so much more.
We still need to visit other inns, to help in the daily operation of our own. Yes, it is important. To think we never need to visit another inn is ludicrous. If this is our industry, we need to be devoted to keeping abreast of what is going on out there and how other inns operate.
Sure we can glean from the forum, but as mentioned, we don't always "get it." Walking in anothers shoes, so to speak, seeing where they are and how they deal with guests, etc in that environs...well that makes all the difference.
Part of our annual budget s/b to visit other B&B's. And...if you visit innmates you may find the stay is recipricated and you can just pay for the travel. :)
Innvites are open...come and see us here.
Maybe the anon inns to innvite the innmates (sheesh I am getting carries away with the INN prefixes) to their inns. Perhaps the anon innkeepers THINK they ave innvited, but they have not. Or perhaps they don't want any innkeeping fellowship inn person..
It really does help to visit other B&B's for ideas. You can sort out your own style by watching how things are done by visiting friends from here or just staying at B&B's while traveling. I know I've mentioned some of these horrors before, but they are worth repeating for aspirings:
  • If you highlight your fireplaces as an added amenity, they had better be fireplaces and not an electronic picture of a fire with no heat;
  • Your guests don't care if you're leaving on vacation next week and are in the process of 'shutting down the building', they paid full price and they expect full services;
  • If you burn the breakfast, recook it, don't tell the guests to 'eat around the burnt parts';
  • Do not monopolize your guests' time with your sob story or the history of the house;
  • If it is snowing outside, saying you see no reason to ever turn the heat above 60 is NOT gracious hosting;
  • You may love your animals, but they absolutely do not belong in the dining room while guests are eating. Do not continually refer to the 4-legged mop at my feet as 'my precious' while it is attempting to pull food from my plate;
  • Try sleeping in your own rooms and note that the 500w parking lot light shines directly onto the bed ALL NIGHT LONG!
  • There is absolutely no reason a guest's breakfast should be cold when it is placed in front of them. If something distracted you, reheat the damned thing before serving it;
  • Those floor mats in the bathroom? If you're not going to wash them between guests, at least tell housekeeping to shake them out and vacuum them.
OTOH, I have had marvelous visits with innkeepers who totally GET customer service!
  • A full suite of amenities provided (especially useful as my luggage went one way and I the other);
  • Fully recognizable food for breakfast (not everyone appreciates everything laden with sauces);
  • A wonderful array of afternoon refreshments;
  • Appropriate, guest-controlled heating and cooling;
  • CLEAN accommodations.
.
Ok here is one. I have held this in a long as I could. I hope this is on one on here but check just in case.
If you have a picture on your web site with the toilet seat up you should get it off as soon as you can. I have seen several site like this.
One lady says she has been photographer for 20 years and has a bed and breakfast. She wanted to be put on a list to photograph others bed and breakfast and there are three pictures with the seat up on her site. One is a reflection in a mirror so you get to see it twice. It is like she is showcasing the toilet. I am not sure why anyone would hire her to photograph their inn. I saw another that has the seat up and the towels had been used. Also if your blankets are not straight by all means straighten them. This is so unprofessional looking. I really don't think people would take you serious. Ok I said these things because I think they need to be said. I am really not trying to be mean just honest.
.
While we are talking toilets...another one is a near empty or EMPTY tp roll. It is just something that catches your eye in a bad way.
 

sandynn

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What does help is to go and visit some innmates! "No innkeeper is an island"
Once you see them in their innvironment, then you can better understand where they are coming from. I know this is not possible most of the time, but if you can visit one inn per year, say, you would grasp so much more.
We still need to visit other inns, to help in the daily operation of our own. Yes, it is important. To think we never need to visit another inn is ludicrous. If this is our industry, we need to be devoted to keeping abreast of what is going on out there and how other inns operate.
Sure we can glean from the forum, but as mentioned, we don't always "get it." Walking in anothers shoes, so to speak, seeing where they are and how they deal with guests, etc in that environs...well that makes all the difference.
Part of our annual budget s/b to visit other B&B's. And...if you visit innmates you may find the stay is recipricated and you can just pay for the travel. :)
Innvites are open...come and see us here.
Maybe the anon inns to innvite the innmates (sheesh I am getting carries away with the INN prefixes) to their inns. Perhaps the anon innkeepers THINK they ave innvited, but they have not. Or perhaps they don't want any innkeeping fellowship inn person..
It really does help to visit other B&B's for ideas. You can sort out your own style by watching how things are done by visiting friends from here or just staying at B&B's while traveling. I know I've mentioned some of these horrors before, but they are worth repeating for aspirings:
  • If you highlight your fireplaces as an added amenity, they had better be fireplaces and not an electronic picture of a fire with no heat;
  • Your guests don't care if you're leaving on vacation next week and are in the process of 'shutting down the building', they paid full price and they expect full services;
  • If you burn the breakfast, recook it, don't tell the guests to 'eat around the burnt parts';
  • Do not monopolize your guests' time with your sob story or the history of the house;
  • If it is snowing outside, saying you see no reason to ever turn the heat above 60 is NOT gracious hosting;
  • You may love your animals, but they absolutely do not belong in the dining room while guests are eating. Do not continually refer to the 4-legged mop at my feet as 'my precious' while it is attempting to pull food from my plate;
  • Try sleeping in your own rooms and note that the 500w parking lot light shines directly onto the bed ALL NIGHT LONG!
  • There is absolutely no reason a guest's breakfast should be cold when it is placed in front of them. If something distracted you, reheat the damned thing before serving it;
  • Those floor mats in the bathroom? If you're not going to wash them between guests, at least tell housekeeping to shake them out and vacuum them.
OTOH, I have had marvelous visits with innkeepers who totally GET customer service!
  • A full suite of amenities provided (especially useful as my luggage went one way and I the other);
  • Fully recognizable food for breakfast (not everyone appreciates everything laden with sauces);
  • A wonderful array of afternoon refreshments;
  • Appropriate, guest-controlled heating and cooling;
  • CLEAN accommodations.
.
Ok here is one. I have held this in a long as I could. I hope this is on one on here but check just in case.
If you have a picture on your web site with the toilet seat up you should get it off as soon as you can. I have seen several site like this.
One lady says she has been photographer for 20 years and has a bed and breakfast. She wanted to be put on a list to photograph others bed and breakfast and there are three pictures with the seat up on her site. One is a reflection in a mirror so you get to see it twice. It is like she is showcasing the toilet. I am not sure why anyone would hire her to photograph their inn. I saw another that has the seat up and the towels had been used. Also if your blankets are not straight by all means straighten them. This is so unprofessional looking. I really don't think people would take you serious. Ok I said these things because I think they need to be said. I am really not trying to be mean just honest.
.
I don't think you have a mean bone in your body! :) That is all excellent advice!
.
Thanks!!! I really need to get that off my chest. I don't know why some don't see it.
 

sandynn

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 15, 2008
Messages
457
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What does help is to go and visit some innmates! "No innkeeper is an island"
Once you see them in their innvironment, then you can better understand where they are coming from. I know this is not possible most of the time, but if you can visit one inn per year, say, you would grasp so much more.
We still need to visit other inns, to help in the daily operation of our own. Yes, it is important. To think we never need to visit another inn is ludicrous. If this is our industry, we need to be devoted to keeping abreast of what is going on out there and how other inns operate.
Sure we can glean from the forum, but as mentioned, we don't always "get it." Walking in anothers shoes, so to speak, seeing where they are and how they deal with guests, etc in that environs...well that makes all the difference.
Part of our annual budget s/b to visit other B&B's. And...if you visit innmates you may find the stay is recipricated and you can just pay for the travel. :)
Innvites are open...come and see us here.
Maybe the anon inns to innvite the innmates (sheesh I am getting carries away with the INN prefixes) to their inns. Perhaps the anon innkeepers THINK they ave innvited, but they have not. Or perhaps they don't want any innkeeping fellowship inn person..
It really does help to visit other B&B's for ideas. You can sort out your own style by watching how things are done by visiting friends from here or just staying at B&B's while traveling. I know I've mentioned some of these horrors before, but they are worth repeating for aspirings:
  • If you highlight your fireplaces as an added amenity, they had better be fireplaces and not an electronic picture of a fire with no heat;
  • Your guests don't care if you're leaving on vacation next week and are in the process of 'shutting down the building', they paid full price and they expect full services;
  • If you burn the breakfast, recook it, don't tell the guests to 'eat around the burnt parts';
  • Do not monopolize your guests' time with your sob story or the history of the house;
  • If it is snowing outside, saying you see no reason to ever turn the heat above 60 is NOT gracious hosting;
  • You may love your animals, but they absolutely do not belong in the dining room while guests are eating. Do not continually refer to the 4-legged mop at my feet as 'my precious' while it is attempting to pull food from my plate;
  • Try sleeping in your own rooms and note that the 500w parking lot light shines directly onto the bed ALL NIGHT LONG!
  • There is absolutely no reason a guest's breakfast should be cold when it is placed in front of them. If something distracted you, reheat the damned thing before serving it;
  • Those floor mats in the bathroom? If you're not going to wash them between guests, at least tell housekeeping to shake them out and vacuum them.
OTOH, I have had marvelous visits with innkeepers who totally GET customer service!
  • A full suite of amenities provided (especially useful as my luggage went one way and I the other);
  • Fully recognizable food for breakfast (not everyone appreciates everything laden with sauces);
  • A wonderful array of afternoon refreshments;
  • Appropriate, guest-controlled heating and cooling;
  • CLEAN accommodations.
.
Ok here is one. I have held this in a long as I could. I hope this is on one on here but check just in case.
If you have a picture on your web site with the toilet seat up you should get it off as soon as you can. I have seen several site like this.
One lady says she has been photographer for 20 years and has a bed and breakfast. She wanted to be put on a list to photograph others bed and breakfast and there are three pictures with the seat up on her site. One is a reflection in a mirror so you get to see it twice. It is like she is showcasing the toilet. I am not sure why anyone would hire her to photograph their inn. I saw another that has the seat up and the towels had been used. Also if your blankets are not straight by all means straighten them. This is so unprofessional looking. I really don't think people would take you serious. Ok I said these things because I think they need to be said. I am really not trying to be mean just honest.
.
While we are talking toilets...another one is a near empty or EMPTY tp roll. It is just something that catches your eye in a bad way.
.
That is another one. I see it all the time.
Oh one more thing. Look up at your fans once in a while. I have gone to stay in several b&bs and looked up at the fan and it looked as though it had not been cleaned in a year. I only takes me 5 minutes once a month to keep it clean.
 

sandynn

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 15, 2008
Messages
457
Reaction score
0
What does help is to go and visit some innmates! "No innkeeper is an island"
Once you see them in their innvironment, then you can better understand where they are coming from. I know this is not possible most of the time, but if you can visit one inn per year, say, you would grasp so much more.
We still need to visit other inns, to help in the daily operation of our own. Yes, it is important. To think we never need to visit another inn is ludicrous. If this is our industry, we need to be devoted to keeping abreast of what is going on out there and how other inns operate.
Sure we can glean from the forum, but as mentioned, we don't always "get it." Walking in anothers shoes, so to speak, seeing where they are and how they deal with guests, etc in that environs...well that makes all the difference.
Part of our annual budget s/b to visit other B&B's. And...if you visit innmates you may find the stay is recipricated and you can just pay for the travel. :)
Innvites are open...come and see us here.
Maybe the anon inns to innvite the innmates (sheesh I am getting carries away with the INN prefixes) to their inns. Perhaps the anon innkeepers THINK they ave innvited, but they have not. Or perhaps they don't want any innkeeping fellowship inn person..
It really does help to visit other B&B's for ideas. You can sort out your own style by watching how things are done by visiting friends from here or just staying at B&B's while traveling. I know I've mentioned some of these horrors before, but they are worth repeating for aspirings:
  • If you highlight your fireplaces as an added amenity, they had better be fireplaces and not an electronic picture of a fire with no heat;
  • Your guests don't care if you're leaving on vacation next week and are in the process of 'shutting down the building', they paid full price and they expect full services;
  • If you burn the breakfast, recook it, don't tell the guests to 'eat around the burnt parts';
  • Do not monopolize your guests' time with your sob story or the history of the house;
  • If it is snowing outside, saying you see no reason to ever turn the heat above 60 is NOT gracious hosting;
  • You may love your animals, but they absolutely do not belong in the dining room while guests are eating. Do not continually refer to the 4-legged mop at my feet as 'my precious' while it is attempting to pull food from my plate;
  • Try sleeping in your own rooms and note that the 500w parking lot light shines directly onto the bed ALL NIGHT LONG!
  • There is absolutely no reason a guest's breakfast should be cold when it is placed in front of them. If something distracted you, reheat the damned thing before serving it;
  • Those floor mats in the bathroom? If you're not going to wash them between guests, at least tell housekeeping to shake them out and vacuum them.
OTOH, I have had marvelous visits with innkeepers who totally GET customer service!
  • A full suite of amenities provided (especially useful as my luggage went one way and I the other);
  • Fully recognizable food for breakfast (not everyone appreciates everything laden with sauces);
  • A wonderful array of afternoon refreshments;
  • Appropriate, guest-controlled heating and cooling;
  • CLEAN accommodations.
.
Ok here is one. I have held this in a long as I could. I hope this is on one on here but check just in case.
If you have a picture on your web site with the toilet seat up you should get it off as soon as you can. I have seen several site like this.
One lady says she has been photographer for 20 years and has a bed and breakfast. She wanted to be put on a list to photograph others bed and breakfast and there are three pictures with the seat up on her site. One is a reflection in a mirror so you get to see it twice. It is like she is showcasing the toilet. I am not sure why anyone would hire her to photograph their inn. I saw another that has the seat up and the towels had been used. Also if your blankets are not straight by all means straighten them. This is so unprofessional looking. I really don't think people would take you serious. Ok I said these things because I think they need to be said. I am really not trying to be mean just honest.
.
I tell people about their toilet seats all the time :) I even tell many of my friend who have rental cabins. One good friend had some really upscale timber frame cabins..the best...and she gave me photos for her website and I told her...sorry...my pet peev....toilet seat up...no photo of it on the site. She never gave it a thought before.
.
I am glad you didn't use it. I really does baffle me why people don't see it for themselves. :)
 

Alibi Ike

Well-known member
Staff member
Joined
Aug 8, 2010
Messages
2,928
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What does help is to go and visit some innmates! "No innkeeper is an island"
Once you see them in their innvironment, then you can better understand where they are coming from. I know this is not possible most of the time, but if you can visit one inn per year, say, you would grasp so much more.
We still need to visit other inns, to help in the daily operation of our own. Yes, it is important. To think we never need to visit another inn is ludicrous. If this is our industry, we need to be devoted to keeping abreast of what is going on out there and how other inns operate.
Sure we can glean from the forum, but as mentioned, we don't always "get it." Walking in anothers shoes, so to speak, seeing where they are and how they deal with guests, etc in that environs...well that makes all the difference.
Part of our annual budget s/b to visit other B&B's. And...if you visit innmates you may find the stay is recipricated and you can just pay for the travel. :)
Innvites are open...come and see us here.
Maybe the anon inns to innvite the innmates (sheesh I am getting carries away with the INN prefixes) to their inns. Perhaps the anon innkeepers THINK they ave innvited, but they have not. Or perhaps they don't want any innkeeping fellowship inn person..
It really does help to visit other B&B's for ideas. You can sort out your own style by watching how things are done by visiting friends from here or just staying at B&B's while traveling. I know I've mentioned some of these horrors before, but they are worth repeating for aspirings:
  • If you highlight your fireplaces as an added amenity, they had better be fireplaces and not an electronic picture of a fire with no heat;
  • Your guests don't care if you're leaving on vacation next week and are in the process of 'shutting down the building', they paid full price and they expect full services;
  • If you burn the breakfast, recook it, don't tell the guests to 'eat around the burnt parts';
  • Do not monopolize your guests' time with your sob story or the history of the house;
  • If it is snowing outside, saying you see no reason to ever turn the heat above 60 is NOT gracious hosting;
  • You may love your animals, but they absolutely do not belong in the dining room while guests are eating. Do not continually refer to the 4-legged mop at my feet as 'my precious' while it is attempting to pull food from my plate;
  • Try sleeping in your own rooms and note that the 500w parking lot light shines directly onto the bed ALL NIGHT LONG!
  • There is absolutely no reason a guest's breakfast should be cold when it is placed in front of them. If something distracted you, reheat the damned thing before serving it;
  • Those floor mats in the bathroom? If you're not going to wash them between guests, at least tell housekeeping to shake them out and vacuum them.
OTOH, I have had marvelous visits with innkeepers who totally GET customer service!
  • A full suite of amenities provided (especially useful as my luggage went one way and I the other);
  • Fully recognizable food for breakfast (not everyone appreciates everything laden with sauces);
  • A wonderful array of afternoon refreshments;
  • Appropriate, guest-controlled heating and cooling;
  • CLEAN accommodations.
.
Ok here is one. I have held this in a long as I could. I hope this is on one on here but check just in case.
If you have a picture on your web site with the toilet seat up you should get it off as soon as you can. I have seen several site like this.
One lady says she has been photographer for 20 years and has a bed and breakfast. She wanted to be put on a list to photograph others bed and breakfast and there are three pictures with the seat up on her site. One is a reflection in a mirror so you get to see it twice. It is like she is showcasing the toilet. I am not sure why anyone would hire her to photograph their inn. I saw another that has the seat up and the towels had been used. Also if your blankets are not straight by all means straighten them. This is so unprofessional looking. I really don't think people would take you serious. Ok I said these things because I think they need to be said. I am really not trying to be mean just honest.
.
Totally agree. The room should be spotless, everything shold be straightened out, nothing should be 'hanging out' from under the covers (especially the mattress or the boxspring!), mirrors & pictures should be aligned and all the 'stuff' should be gone. No cords showing if it's possible. And, yes, close the dang toilet seat.
 

Alibi Ike

Well-known member
Staff member
Joined
Aug 8, 2010
Messages
2,928
Reaction score
0
What does help is to go and visit some innmates! "No innkeeper is an island"
Once you see them in their innvironment, then you can better understand where they are coming from. I know this is not possible most of the time, but if you can visit one inn per year, say, you would grasp so much more.
We still need to visit other inns, to help in the daily operation of our own. Yes, it is important. To think we never need to visit another inn is ludicrous. If this is our industry, we need to be devoted to keeping abreast of what is going on out there and how other inns operate.
Sure we can glean from the forum, but as mentioned, we don't always "get it." Walking in anothers shoes, so to speak, seeing where they are and how they deal with guests, etc in that environs...well that makes all the difference.
Part of our annual budget s/b to visit other B&B's. And...if you visit innmates you may find the stay is recipricated and you can just pay for the travel. :)
Innvites are open...come and see us here.
Maybe the anon inns to innvite the innmates (sheesh I am getting carries away with the INN prefixes) to their inns. Perhaps the anon innkeepers THINK they ave innvited, but they have not. Or perhaps they don't want any innkeeping fellowship inn person..
It really does help to visit other B&B's for ideas. You can sort out your own style by watching how things are done by visiting friends from here or just staying at B&B's while traveling. I know I've mentioned some of these horrors before, but they are worth repeating for aspirings:
  • If you highlight your fireplaces as an added amenity, they had better be fireplaces and not an electronic picture of a fire with no heat;
  • Your guests don't care if you're leaving on vacation next week and are in the process of 'shutting down the building', they paid full price and they expect full services;
  • If you burn the breakfast, recook it, don't tell the guests to 'eat around the burnt parts';
  • Do not monopolize your guests' time with your sob story or the history of the house;
  • If it is snowing outside, saying you see no reason to ever turn the heat above 60 is NOT gracious hosting;
  • You may love your animals, but they absolutely do not belong in the dining room while guests are eating. Do not continually refer to the 4-legged mop at my feet as 'my precious' while it is attempting to pull food from my plate;
  • Try sleeping in your own rooms and note that the 500w parking lot light shines directly onto the bed ALL NIGHT LONG!
  • There is absolutely no reason a guest's breakfast should be cold when it is placed in front of them. If something distracted you, reheat the damned thing before serving it;
  • Those floor mats in the bathroom? If you're not going to wash them between guests, at least tell housekeeping to shake them out and vacuum them.
OTOH, I have had marvelous visits with innkeepers who totally GET customer service!
  • A full suite of amenities provided (especially useful as my luggage went one way and I the other);
  • Fully recognizable food for breakfast (not everyone appreciates everything laden with sauces);
  • A wonderful array of afternoon refreshments;
  • Appropriate, guest-controlled heating and cooling;
  • CLEAN accommodations.
.
Ok here is one. I have held this in a long as I could. I hope this is on one on here but check just in case.
If you have a picture on your web site with the toilet seat up you should get it off as soon as you can. I have seen several site like this.
One lady says she has been photographer for 20 years and has a bed and breakfast. She wanted to be put on a list to photograph others bed and breakfast and there are three pictures with the seat up on her site. One is a reflection in a mirror so you get to see it twice. It is like she is showcasing the toilet. I am not sure why anyone would hire her to photograph their inn. I saw another that has the seat up and the towels had been used. Also if your blankets are not straight by all means straighten them. This is so unprofessional looking. I really don't think people would take you serious. Ok I said these things because I think they need to be said. I am really not trying to be mean just honest.
.
While we are talking toilets...another one is a near empty or EMPTY tp roll. It is just something that catches your eye in a bad way.
.
That is another one. I see it all the time.
Oh one more thing. Look up at your fans once in a while. I have gone to stay in several b&bs and looked up at the fan and it looked as though it had not been cleaned in a year. I only takes me 5 minutes once a month to keep it clean.
.
The ceiling fan is one of my failings. When I notice it is when I'm talking to someone and I can't handily grab the swiffer and dust it off. It seems like one day it's fine and the next it has all the wispy bits hanging around the edges.
 

Samster

Well-known member
Joined
May 30, 2008
Messages
6,475
Reaction score
14
Location
South Carolina
What does help is to go and visit some innmates! "No innkeeper is an island"
Once you see them in their innvironment, then you can better understand where they are coming from. I know this is not possible most of the time, but if you can visit one inn per year, say, you would grasp so much more.
We still need to visit other inns, to help in the daily operation of our own. Yes, it is important. To think we never need to visit another inn is ludicrous. If this is our industry, we need to be devoted to keeping abreast of what is going on out there and how other inns operate.
Sure we can glean from the forum, but as mentioned, we don't always "get it." Walking in anothers shoes, so to speak, seeing where they are and how they deal with guests, etc in that environs...well that makes all the difference.
Part of our annual budget s/b to visit other B&B's. And...if you visit innmates you may find the stay is recipricated and you can just pay for the travel. :)
Innvites are open...come and see us here.
Maybe the anon inns to innvite the innmates (sheesh I am getting carries away with the INN prefixes) to their inns. Perhaps the anon innkeepers THINK they ave innvited, but they have not. Or perhaps they don't want any innkeeping fellowship inn person..
It really does help to visit other B&B's for ideas. You can sort out your own style by watching how things are done by visiting friends from here or just staying at B&B's while traveling. I know I've mentioned some of these horrors before, but they are worth repeating for aspirings:
  • If you highlight your fireplaces as an added amenity, they had better be fireplaces and not an electronic picture of a fire with no heat;
  • Your guests don't care if you're leaving on vacation next week and are in the process of 'shutting down the building', they paid full price and they expect full services;
  • If you burn the breakfast, recook it, don't tell the guests to 'eat around the burnt parts';
  • Do not monopolize your guests' time with your sob story or the history of the house;
  • If it is snowing outside, saying you see no reason to ever turn the heat above 60 is NOT gracious hosting;
  • You may love your animals, but they absolutely do not belong in the dining room while guests are eating. Do not continually refer to the 4-legged mop at my feet as 'my precious' while it is attempting to pull food from my plate;
  • Try sleeping in your own rooms and note that the 500w parking lot light shines directly onto the bed ALL NIGHT LONG!
  • There is absolutely no reason a guest's breakfast should be cold when it is placed in front of them. If something distracted you, reheat the damned thing before serving it;
  • Those floor mats in the bathroom? If you're not going to wash them between guests, at least tell housekeeping to shake them out and vacuum them.
OTOH, I have had marvelous visits with innkeepers who totally GET customer service!
  • A full suite of amenities provided (especially useful as my luggage went one way and I the other);
  • Fully recognizable food for breakfast (not everyone appreciates everything laden with sauces);
  • A wonderful array of afternoon refreshments;
  • Appropriate, guest-controlled heating and cooling;
  • CLEAN accommodations.
.
Ok here is one. I have held this in a long as I could. I hope this is on one on here but check just in case.
If you have a picture on your web site with the toilet seat up you should get it off as soon as you can. I have seen several site like this.
One lady says she has been photographer for 20 years and has a bed and breakfast. She wanted to be put on a list to photograph others bed and breakfast and there are three pictures with the seat up on her site. One is a reflection in a mirror so you get to see it twice. It is like she is showcasing the toilet. I am not sure why anyone would hire her to photograph their inn. I saw another that has the seat up and the towels had been used. Also if your blankets are not straight by all means straighten them. This is so unprofessional looking. I really don't think people would take you serious. Ok I said these things because I think they need to be said. I am really not trying to be mean just honest.
.
While we are talking toilets...another one is a near empty or EMPTY tp roll. It is just something that catches your eye in a bad way.
.
That is another one. I see it all the time.
Oh one more thing. Look up at your fans once in a while. I have gone to stay in several b&bs and looked up at the fan and it looked as though it had not been cleaned in a year. I only takes me 5 minutes once a month to keep it clean.
.
How about all the dust on bathroom fans and furnace air intakes? That looks gross to me.....
 
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