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EmptyNest

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Ok, so I have had a half dozen innkeepers email me about wanting to do a blog for their inn. Of course, they all attended the same conference and heard "someone" say "it is REALLY important to have a blog."
So my statement to them was...."And what are you going to do with it??? What do you think it will do for you? Are you going to update it and put in pertinent information for your guests? Most of the ones I have seen are nothing more than a poor diary of an innkeepers daily routine. Who cares? Who will read this??
We all know people don't even read the inn's web site!!!! So why would someone take time for a blog??? Is this only for search engine's sake?? If so, many people need to be prepared for disappointment.
I point them to the 2 or 3 really well done innkeeping blogs I have seen and tell them...are you ready to do the work involved? Just posting something there once a month just isn't going to cut it.
SO, can someone please tell me...REALLY...what good does a blog do for an inn??? And why are folks telling them this is so important??
Found this link and thought this expressed well what I am thinking and trying to share with friends contacting me about blogs.
Thanks for you feedback.
 

Morticia

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My take on it, especially if it means less work for YOU as the web guru!
  • Great place for the innkeeper to post specials and things to do in the area;
  • Great place for the innkeeper to keep in touch with guests;
  • Great place for the innkeeper to post PHOTOS of seasons;
  • The list goes on...
As far as how it helps overall, the more pages the website has (and I'm considering my blog as an extension of my website even tho it is not connected), the more chances someone will use the search term the innkeeper has blogged about.
You can SEO your webpages to death and have each page shine as far as a certain term goes, but you can't make the guest use THAT term to find you.
If your innkeepers are sending newsletters, they can direct guests to the content on the blog. If they have FB and/or Twitter (and I'm guessing not), the blog can get out to those subscribers as well.
It's just an easy way for the innkeeper without coding skills to make new content and share it immediately. A webpage may take months to show in searches, a blog is there NOW.
You know these innkeepers well and you know what they will and won't do on their own. BUT, telling them to block out 20 minutes on a Monday morning to blog about something interesting coming up in the next month or so is something they CAN do. And once some guest books and says, 'I saw it on your blog,' they'll get hooked.
Don't know who they heard speak, but Blogger is the one I use because it's easy and free. If you can type, you can blog.
One thing to make sure they understand, tho, is that the blog may be the first thing the guest sees, so it had better be 'polished' and not filled with typos, grammar errors, etc.
If any of them want a 'second opinion' on blogging, feel free to tell them to call or email me. I will happily tell them how much time it takes in a week for me to blog and what's involved.
 

Morticia

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My take on it, especially if it means less work for YOU as the web guru!
  • Great place for the innkeeper to post specials and things to do in the area;
  • Great place for the innkeeper to keep in touch with guests;
  • Great place for the innkeeper to post PHOTOS of seasons;
  • The list goes on...
As far as how it helps overall, the more pages the website has (and I'm considering my blog as an extension of my website even tho it is not connected), the more chances someone will use the search term the innkeeper has blogged about.
You can SEO your webpages to death and have each page shine as far as a certain term goes, but you can't make the guest use THAT term to find you.
If your innkeepers are sending newsletters, they can direct guests to the content on the blog. If they have FB and/or Twitter (and I'm guessing not), the blog can get out to those subscribers as well.
It's just an easy way for the innkeeper without coding skills to make new content and share it immediately. A webpage may take months to show in searches, a blog is there NOW.
You know these innkeepers well and you know what they will and won't do on their own. BUT, telling them to block out 20 minutes on a Monday morning to blog about something interesting coming up in the next month or so is something they CAN do. And once some guest books and says, 'I saw it on your blog,' they'll get hooked.
Don't know who they heard speak, but Blogger is the one I use because it's easy and free. If you can type, you can blog.
One thing to make sure they understand, tho, is that the blog may be the first thing the guest sees, so it had better be 'polished' and not filled with typos, grammar errors, etc.
If any of them want a 'second opinion' on blogging, feel free to tell them to call or email me. I will happily tell them how much time it takes in a week for me to blog and what's involved..
One more thing, after reading that article...my purpose. Why I do this is multi-fold. I do it for the reasons mentioned -getting the word out, keeping in touch, adding quality content. But I also do it for me. I blog because I think I have something to say. Yes, totally self-centered on that one, but those blogs are the ones that get responses!
If you look to see what blogs have comments, they are usually the ones I wrote about something totally unrelated to the inn, but they struck a chord with guests. A beautiful coastline, taking time to 'be' with your family, my snowshoeing accident.
For the most part, not about the inn at all.
They do need to determine the purpose. Is it a 'chatty' blog because guests really want to know about the day to day? A 'tourist info center' blog about what to do? Having a purpose is good, but it need not be narrow. It should be focused on their guests, tho. So, they need first to know what kind of guests they have and want and write to them.
I try to picture one particular guest when I write some of the blogs. I write to that person.
 

gillumhouse

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I get hits on my web site because of my Blog. I blogged about the wonderful living history program the museum did - about the woman represented - and I have have many hits on my site because of that. I posted about the descendents of the dounders of my City coming to visit the 1778 log house and other things in my City, classes, events, the $%^*&* snow, and about places i have visited and enjoyed. Just about every blog I have done has brought one or more visitors. And I an not consistent, but I blog when I have something to say.
 

EmptyNest

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My take on it, especially if it means less work for YOU as the web guru!
  • Great place for the innkeeper to post specials and things to do in the area;
  • Great place for the innkeeper to keep in touch with guests;
  • Great place for the innkeeper to post PHOTOS of seasons;
  • The list goes on...
As far as how it helps overall, the more pages the website has (and I'm considering my blog as an extension of my website even tho it is not connected), the more chances someone will use the search term the innkeeper has blogged about.
You can SEO your webpages to death and have each page shine as far as a certain term goes, but you can't make the guest use THAT term to find you.
If your innkeepers are sending newsletters, they can direct guests to the content on the blog. If they have FB and/or Twitter (and I'm guessing not), the blog can get out to those subscribers as well.
It's just an easy way for the innkeeper without coding skills to make new content and share it immediately. A webpage may take months to show in searches, a blog is there NOW.
You know these innkeepers well and you know what they will and won't do on their own. BUT, telling them to block out 20 minutes on a Monday morning to blog about something interesting coming up in the next month or so is something they CAN do. And once some guest books and says, 'I saw it on your blog,' they'll get hooked.
Don't know who they heard speak, but Blogger is the one I use because it's easy and free. If you can type, you can blog.
One thing to make sure they understand, tho, is that the blog may be the first thing the guest sees, so it had better be 'polished' and not filled with typos, grammar errors, etc.
If any of them want a 'second opinion' on blogging, feel free to tell them to call or email me. I will happily tell them how much time it takes in a week for me to blog and what's involved..
One more thing, after reading that article...my purpose. Why I do this is multi-fold. I do it for the reasons mentioned -getting the word out, keeping in touch, adding quality content. But I also do it for me. I blog because I think I have something to say. Yes, totally self-centered on that one, but those blogs are the ones that get responses!
If you look to see what blogs have comments, they are usually the ones I wrote about something totally unrelated to the inn, but they struck a chord with guests. A beautiful coastline, taking time to 'be' with your family, my snowshoeing accident.
For the most part, not about the inn at all.
They do need to determine the purpose. Is it a 'chatty' blog because guests really want to know about the day to day? A 'tourist info center' blog about what to do? Having a purpose is good, but it need not be narrow. It should be focused on their guests, tho. So, they need first to know what kind of guests they have and want and write to them.
I try to picture one particular guest when I write some of the blogs. I write to that person.
.
Yep you echo my sentiments exactly. The problem is..folks I know personally...and I know they will not be keeping these updated. I have seen it in non-action already. And those who do post, are posting dull as dishwater stuff that I personally don't care to read.
You say you have kept your blog outside of your domain. ...the "experts" say you shouldn't...that is I guess what is bothering me as well.
If you have lots of links to your site and links to good stories, events etc..what difference does it actually make. Maybe SWIRT can speak to the technical side of it.
Experts say WORDPRESS is easy to use..but...most innkeeper ( not those here...) don't have a clue about installation, set up etc...they would have to have their hosting company so that.
 

EmptyNest

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I get hits on my web site because of my Blog. I blogged about the wonderful living history program the museum did - about the woman represented - and I have have many hits on my site because of that. I posted about the descendents of the dounders of my City coming to visit the 1778 log house and other things in my City, classes, events, the $%^*&* snow, and about places i have visited and enjoyed. Just about every blog I have done has brought one or more visitors. And I an not consistent, but I blog when I have something to say..
I just visited your site. I had to search to find your blog link. Why don't you have it right up front with all the other navigation? Wouldn't that make it more likely to be found??
 

Morticia

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My take on it, especially if it means less work for YOU as the web guru!
  • Great place for the innkeeper to post specials and things to do in the area;
  • Great place for the innkeeper to keep in touch with guests;
  • Great place for the innkeeper to post PHOTOS of seasons;
  • The list goes on...
As far as how it helps overall, the more pages the website has (and I'm considering my blog as an extension of my website even tho it is not connected), the more chances someone will use the search term the innkeeper has blogged about.
You can SEO your webpages to death and have each page shine as far as a certain term goes, but you can't make the guest use THAT term to find you.
If your innkeepers are sending newsletters, they can direct guests to the content on the blog. If they have FB and/or Twitter (and I'm guessing not), the blog can get out to those subscribers as well.
It's just an easy way for the innkeeper without coding skills to make new content and share it immediately. A webpage may take months to show in searches, a blog is there NOW.
You know these innkeepers well and you know what they will and won't do on their own. BUT, telling them to block out 20 minutes on a Monday morning to blog about something interesting coming up in the next month or so is something they CAN do. And once some guest books and says, 'I saw it on your blog,' they'll get hooked.
Don't know who they heard speak, but Blogger is the one I use because it's easy and free. If you can type, you can blog.
One thing to make sure they understand, tho, is that the blog may be the first thing the guest sees, so it had better be 'polished' and not filled with typos, grammar errors, etc.
If any of them want a 'second opinion' on blogging, feel free to tell them to call or email me. I will happily tell them how much time it takes in a week for me to blog and what's involved..
One more thing, after reading that article...my purpose. Why I do this is multi-fold. I do it for the reasons mentioned -getting the word out, keeping in touch, adding quality content. But I also do it for me. I blog because I think I have something to say. Yes, totally self-centered on that one, but those blogs are the ones that get responses!
If you look to see what blogs have comments, they are usually the ones I wrote about something totally unrelated to the inn, but they struck a chord with guests. A beautiful coastline, taking time to 'be' with your family, my snowshoeing accident.
For the most part, not about the inn at all.
They do need to determine the purpose. Is it a 'chatty' blog because guests really want to know about the day to day? A 'tourist info center' blog about what to do? Having a purpose is good, but it need not be narrow. It should be focused on their guests, tho. So, they need first to know what kind of guests they have and want and write to them.
I try to picture one particular guest when I write some of the blogs. I write to that person.
.
Yep you echo my sentiments exactly. The problem is..folks I know personally...and I know they will not be keeping these updated. I have seen it in non-action already. And those who do post, are posting dull as dishwater stuff that I personally don't care to read.
You say you have kept your blog outside of your domain. ...the "experts" say you shouldn't...that is I guess what is bothering me as well.
If you have lots of links to your site and links to good stories, events etc..what difference does it actually make. Maybe SWIRT can speak to the technical side of it.
Experts say WORDPRESS is easy to use..but...most innkeeper ( not those here...) don't have a clue about installation, set up etc...they would have to have their hosting company so that.
.
I have been struggling for weeks to get my blog as a subdomain on my site. Apparently my hosting company doesn't want to play ball with Google. Swirt found another solution for me to try and I'll get to it this weekend.
It's not that I'm deliberately not doing it, I'm being stymied in my attempts.
I know you mentioned how your gang didn't keep up the blog on the group site, maybe they just needed another push in the right direction.
What I was thinking of was for the less technical innkeepers who don't maintain their own sites. If they want to add a new event, it means sending an email to the web guru, waiting in line, perhaps paying out $ for the extra info. At least that's what the guy who was doing the site here for the PO's told me...$35 for each new photo, $25 for new text, $100 for a new page, etc. (And $200/month for making sure the site didn't disappear. Hmmm? Sounds like extortion to me, too.)
It depends on which expert you listen to what's easy and what isn't. I've heard 2 completely different experts in the past 2 weeks say 2 completely different things. I tend to side with the expert who says to use the platform that requires NO intervention from the user. With Blogger, I blog. I let Google worry about everything else. If I understood correctly, WordPress requires maintenance from the user ala updating the code when new releases come out. If the hosting company takes care of that for free, fine. If it's up to the user, not fine.
Like I said, feel free to have any of them call me as I'm a real innkeeper doing it in real time and not an 'expert!'
 

EmptyNest

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Joined
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My take on it, especially if it means less work for YOU as the web guru!
  • Great place for the innkeeper to post specials and things to do in the area;
  • Great place for the innkeeper to keep in touch with guests;
  • Great place for the innkeeper to post PHOTOS of seasons;
  • The list goes on...
As far as how it helps overall, the more pages the website has (and I'm considering my blog as an extension of my website even tho it is not connected), the more chances someone will use the search term the innkeeper has blogged about.
You can SEO your webpages to death and have each page shine as far as a certain term goes, but you can't make the guest use THAT term to find you.
If your innkeepers are sending newsletters, they can direct guests to the content on the blog. If they have FB and/or Twitter (and I'm guessing not), the blog can get out to those subscribers as well.
It's just an easy way for the innkeeper without coding skills to make new content and share it immediately. A webpage may take months to show in searches, a blog is there NOW.
You know these innkeepers well and you know what they will and won't do on their own. BUT, telling them to block out 20 minutes on a Monday morning to blog about something interesting coming up in the next month or so is something they CAN do. And once some guest books and says, 'I saw it on your blog,' they'll get hooked.
Don't know who they heard speak, but Blogger is the one I use because it's easy and free. If you can type, you can blog.
One thing to make sure they understand, tho, is that the blog may be the first thing the guest sees, so it had better be 'polished' and not filled with typos, grammar errors, etc.
If any of them want a 'second opinion' on blogging, feel free to tell them to call or email me. I will happily tell them how much time it takes in a week for me to blog and what's involved..
One more thing, after reading that article...my purpose. Why I do this is multi-fold. I do it for the reasons mentioned -getting the word out, keeping in touch, adding quality content. But I also do it for me. I blog because I think I have something to say. Yes, totally self-centered on that one, but those blogs are the ones that get responses!
If you look to see what blogs have comments, they are usually the ones I wrote about something totally unrelated to the inn, but they struck a chord with guests. A beautiful coastline, taking time to 'be' with your family, my snowshoeing accident.
For the most part, not about the inn at all.
They do need to determine the purpose. Is it a 'chatty' blog because guests really want to know about the day to day? A 'tourist info center' blog about what to do? Having a purpose is good, but it need not be narrow. It should be focused on their guests, tho. So, they need first to know what kind of guests they have and want and write to them.
I try to picture one particular guest when I write some of the blogs. I write to that person.
.
Yep you echo my sentiments exactly. The problem is..folks I know personally...and I know they will not be keeping these updated. I have seen it in non-action already. And those who do post, are posting dull as dishwater stuff that I personally don't care to read.
You say you have kept your blog outside of your domain. ...the "experts" say you shouldn't...that is I guess what is bothering me as well.
If you have lots of links to your site and links to good stories, events etc..what difference does it actually make. Maybe SWIRT can speak to the technical side of it.
Experts say WORDPRESS is easy to use..but...most innkeeper ( not those here...) don't have a clue about installation, set up etc...they would have to have their hosting company so that.
.
I have been struggling for weeks to get my blog as a subdomain on my site. Apparently my hosting company doesn't want to play ball with Google. Swirt found another solution for me to try and I'll get to it this weekend.
It's not that I'm deliberately not doing it, I'm being stymied in my attempts.
I know you mentioned how your gang didn't keep up the blog on the group site, maybe they just needed another push in the right direction.
What I was thinking of was for the less technical innkeepers who don't maintain their own sites. If they want to add a new event, it means sending an email to the web guru, waiting in line, perhaps paying out $ for the extra info. At least that's what the guy who was doing the site here for the PO's told me...$35 for each new photo, $25 for new text, $100 for a new page, etc. (And $200/month for making sure the site didn't disappear. Hmmm? Sounds like extortion to me, too.)
It depends on which expert you listen to what's easy and what isn't. I've heard 2 completely different experts in the past 2 weeks say 2 completely different things. I tend to side with the expert who says to use the platform that requires NO intervention from the user. With Blogger, I blog. I let Google worry about everything else. If I understood correctly, WordPress requires maintenance from the user ala updating the code when new releases come out. If the hosting company takes care of that for free, fine. If it's up to the user, not fine.
Like I said, feel free to have any of them call me as I'm a real innkeeper doing it in real time and not an 'expert!'
.
Sounds like extortion to me
Oh yes, have heard that before. Heck if it takes me just a few minutes to update,I don't charge anything...guess I am too nice

 

swirt

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Just posting something there once a month just isn't going to cut it.
I disagree. One post a month is 12 new pages a year (that's 84 new pages in the course of an avg 7year stint as an innkeeper). Now if that one post a month is nothing more than a long rant about going to the store and not finding the right kind of flour for baking and the right kind of toilet paper, then you are right, it is an utter waste of time.
However, If it is a suggested itnerary for a seasonal visit to your area, or a restaurant review, or a description of an area attraction, or history of something in your area... then go for it. In my opinion one really good post a month is much better than 20 posts about drivel.
When you start casting a bigger and broader "fishing net," you never know what you're going to catch. Over the past few years I've had 6 different people make reservations because they read the tale of my timberframe gazebo construction in a non-inn related blog and wanted to come see the results. They were some of the most fun guests because they had interests in the same thing I did.
We all know people don't even read the inn's web site!!!! So why would someone take time for a blog???
We all know that not everyone reads the website, but that is not the same thing as no one reads the website. (they sound almost the same, but they aren't)
There are lots of times when people will quote things that they read on our site, that I don't even recall writing, but sure enough, they're on their. Some people read through everything, even though lots don't.
My wine blog (which I haven't updated in a year) brought in ~100 visitors in the past year and has a 5% conversion rate .... that is better than some directories.
They may not start on my site and go to my blog, more often than not they start on the blog and come to my site.
Is this only for search engine's sake??
Nope, its for the sake of all the paying guests that the search engines bring in.

Now all that being said... I have seen some horendous blogs created by innkeepers who were told at some conference or by someone that they have to have a blog, and then go create useless posts or worse yet posts that would actually make people run the other way. So they have to have some focus and some idea of what they are doing. ... The teacher in me thought about making a series of multiple choice questions for a test and based on the score would tell them whether they should have a blog or not. You fail... no blog for you LOL
Your questions and concerns are all good and valid. The scary thought of innkeepers being turned loose on a blog without any real direction
was why I wrote this bit on B&B Blogs a while back.
 

swirt

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I get hits on my web site because of my Blog. I blogged about the wonderful living history program the museum did - about the woman represented - and I have have many hits on my site because of that. I posted about the descendents of the dounders of my City coming to visit the 1778 log house and other things in my City, classes, events, the $%^*&* snow, and about places i have visited and enjoyed. Just about every blog I have done has brought one or more visitors. And I an not consistent, but I blog when I have something to say..
I just visited your site. I had to search to find your blog link. Why don't you have it right up front with all the other navigation? Wouldn't that make it more likely to be found??
.
catlady said:
Why don't you have it right up front with all the other navigation? Wouldn't that make it more likely to be found??
Think one-way valve.

 

swirt

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My take on it, especially if it means less work for YOU as the web guru!
  • Great place for the innkeeper to post specials and things to do in the area;
  • Great place for the innkeeper to keep in touch with guests;
  • Great place for the innkeeper to post PHOTOS of seasons;
  • The list goes on...
As far as how it helps overall, the more pages the website has (and I'm considering my blog as an extension of my website even tho it is not connected), the more chances someone will use the search term the innkeeper has blogged about.
You can SEO your webpages to death and have each page shine as far as a certain term goes, but you can't make the guest use THAT term to find you.
If your innkeepers are sending newsletters, they can direct guests to the content on the blog. If they have FB and/or Twitter (and I'm guessing not), the blog can get out to those subscribers as well.
It's just an easy way for the innkeeper without coding skills to make new content and share it immediately. A webpage may take months to show in searches, a blog is there NOW.
You know these innkeepers well and you know what they will and won't do on their own. BUT, telling them to block out 20 minutes on a Monday morning to blog about something interesting coming up in the next month or so is something they CAN do. And once some guest books and says, 'I saw it on your blog,' they'll get hooked.
Don't know who they heard speak, but Blogger is the one I use because it's easy and free. If you can type, you can blog.
One thing to make sure they understand, tho, is that the blog may be the first thing the guest sees, so it had better be 'polished' and not filled with typos, grammar errors, etc.
If any of them want a 'second opinion' on blogging, feel free to tell them to call or email me. I will happily tell them how much time it takes in a week for me to blog and what's involved..
One more thing, after reading that article...my purpose. Why I do this is multi-fold. I do it for the reasons mentioned -getting the word out, keeping in touch, adding quality content. But I also do it for me. I blog because I think I have something to say. Yes, totally self-centered on that one, but those blogs are the ones that get responses!
If you look to see what blogs have comments, they are usually the ones I wrote about something totally unrelated to the inn, but they struck a chord with guests. A beautiful coastline, taking time to 'be' with your family, my snowshoeing accident.
For the most part, not about the inn at all.
They do need to determine the purpose. Is it a 'chatty' blog because guests really want to know about the day to day? A 'tourist info center' blog about what to do? Having a purpose is good, but it need not be narrow. It should be focused on their guests, tho. So, they need first to know what kind of guests they have and want and write to them.
I try to picture one particular guest when I write some of the blogs. I write to that person.
.
Yep you echo my sentiments exactly. The problem is..folks I know personally...and I know they will not be keeping these updated. I have seen it in non-action already. And those who do post, are posting dull as dishwater stuff that I personally don't care to read.
You say you have kept your blog outside of your domain. ...the "experts" say you shouldn't...that is I guess what is bothering me as well.
If you have lots of links to your site and links to good stories, events etc..what difference does it actually make. Maybe SWIRT can speak to the technical side of it.
Experts say WORDPRESS is easy to use..but...most innkeeper ( not those here...) don't have a clue about installation, set up etc...they would have to have their hosting company so that.
.
I have been struggling for weeks to get my blog as a subdomain on my site. Apparently my hosting company doesn't want to play ball with Google. Swirt found another solution for me to try and I'll get to it this weekend.
It's not that I'm deliberately not doing it, I'm being stymied in my attempts.
I know you mentioned how your gang didn't keep up the blog on the group site, maybe they just needed another push in the right direction.
What I was thinking of was for the less technical innkeepers who don't maintain their own sites. If they want to add a new event, it means sending an email to the web guru, waiting in line, perhaps paying out $ for the extra info. At least that's what the guy who was doing the site here for the PO's told me...$35 for each new photo, $25 for new text, $100 for a new page, etc. (And $200/month for making sure the site didn't disappear. Hmmm? Sounds like extortion to me, too.)
It depends on which expert you listen to what's easy and what isn't. I've heard 2 completely different experts in the past 2 weeks say 2 completely different things. I tend to side with the expert who says to use the platform that requires NO intervention from the user. With Blogger, I blog. I let Google worry about everything else. If I understood correctly, WordPress requires maintenance from the user ala updating the code when new releases come out. If the hosting company takes care of that for free, fine. If it's up to the user, not fine.
Like I said, feel free to have any of them call me as I'm a real innkeeper doing it in real time and not an 'expert!'
.
WordPress requires maintenance from the user ala updating the code when new releases come out.
When a new update is released, a notice magically appears at the top of your WordPress control panel. Click the link, count to 20 (just to keep yourself amused) and Zimsalabim your installation is updated.
Not that I am saying Wordpress is better than Blogger, but the updates should not be a reason to avoid it.
 

swirt

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My take on it, especially if it means less work for YOU as the web guru!
  • Great place for the innkeeper to post specials and things to do in the area;
  • Great place for the innkeeper to keep in touch with guests;
  • Great place for the innkeeper to post PHOTOS of seasons;
  • The list goes on...
As far as how it helps overall, the more pages the website has (and I'm considering my blog as an extension of my website even tho it is not connected), the more chances someone will use the search term the innkeeper has blogged about.
You can SEO your webpages to death and have each page shine as far as a certain term goes, but you can't make the guest use THAT term to find you.
If your innkeepers are sending newsletters, they can direct guests to the content on the blog. If they have FB and/or Twitter (and I'm guessing not), the blog can get out to those subscribers as well.
It's just an easy way for the innkeeper without coding skills to make new content and share it immediately. A webpage may take months to show in searches, a blog is there NOW.
You know these innkeepers well and you know what they will and won't do on their own. BUT, telling them to block out 20 minutes on a Monday morning to blog about something interesting coming up in the next month or so is something they CAN do. And once some guest books and says, 'I saw it on your blog,' they'll get hooked.
Don't know who they heard speak, but Blogger is the one I use because it's easy and free. If you can type, you can blog.
One thing to make sure they understand, tho, is that the blog may be the first thing the guest sees, so it had better be 'polished' and not filled with typos, grammar errors, etc.
If any of them want a 'second opinion' on blogging, feel free to tell them to call or email me. I will happily tell them how much time it takes in a week for me to blog and what's involved..
One more thing, after reading that article...my purpose. Why I do this is multi-fold. I do it for the reasons mentioned -getting the word out, keeping in touch, adding quality content. But I also do it for me. I blog because I think I have something to say. Yes, totally self-centered on that one, but those blogs are the ones that get responses!
If you look to see what blogs have comments, they are usually the ones I wrote about something totally unrelated to the inn, but they struck a chord with guests. A beautiful coastline, taking time to 'be' with your family, my snowshoeing accident.
For the most part, not about the inn at all.
They do need to determine the purpose. Is it a 'chatty' blog because guests really want to know about the day to day? A 'tourist info center' blog about what to do? Having a purpose is good, but it need not be narrow. It should be focused on their guests, tho. So, they need first to know what kind of guests they have and want and write to them.
I try to picture one particular guest when I write some of the blogs. I write to that person.
.
Yep you echo my sentiments exactly. The problem is..folks I know personally...and I know they will not be keeping these updated. I have seen it in non-action already. And those who do post, are posting dull as dishwater stuff that I personally don't care to read.
You say you have kept your blog outside of your domain. ...the "experts" say you shouldn't...that is I guess what is bothering me as well.
If you have lots of links to your site and links to good stories, events etc..what difference does it actually make. Maybe SWIRT can speak to the technical side of it.
Experts say WORDPRESS is easy to use..but...most innkeeper ( not those here...) don't have a clue about installation, set up etc...they would have to have their hosting company so that.
.
You say you have kept your blog outside of your domain. ...the "experts" say you shouldn't...that is I guess what is bothering me as well.
If you have lots of links to your site and links to good stories, events etc..what difference does it actually make. Maybe SWIRT can speak to the technical side of it.
I know I've had this discussion on here before ... it is a long drawn out thing ... let me see if I can go find it. (toodles off to find a shovel)
 

Morticia

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Just posting something there once a month just isn't going to cut it.
I disagree. One post a month is 12 new pages a year (that's 84 new pages in the course of an avg 7year stint as an innkeeper). Now if that one post a month is nothing more than a long rant about going to the store and not finding the right kind of flour for baking and the right kind of toilet paper, then you are right, it is an utter waste of time.
However, If it is a suggested itnerary for a seasonal visit to your area, or a restaurant review, or a description of an area attraction, or history of something in your area... then go for it. In my opinion one really good post a month is much better than 20 posts about drivel.
When you start casting a bigger and broader "fishing net," you never know what you're going to catch. Over the past few years I've had 6 different people make reservations because they read the tale of my timberframe gazebo construction in a non-inn related blog and wanted to come see the results. They were some of the most fun guests because they had interests in the same thing I did.
We all know people don't even read the inn's web site!!!! So why would someone take time for a blog???
We all know that not everyone reads the website, but that is not the same thing as no one reads the website. (they sound almost the same, but they aren't)
There are lots of times when people will quote things that they read on our site, that I don't even recall writing, but sure enough, they're on their. Some people read through everything, even though lots don't.
My wine blog (which I haven't updated in a year) brought in ~100 visitors in the past year and has a 5% conversion rate .... that is better than some directories.
They may not start on my site and go to my blog, more often than not they start on the blog and come to my site.
Is this only for search engine's sake??
Nope, its for the sake of all the paying guests that the search engines bring in.

Now all that being said... I have seen some horendous blogs created by innkeepers who were told at some conference or by someone that they have to have a blog, and then go create useless posts or worse yet posts that would actually make people run the other way. So they have to have some focus and some idea of what they are doing. ... The teacher in me thought about making a series of multiple choice questions for a test and based on the score would tell them whether they should have a blog or not. You fail... no blog for you LOL
Your questions and concerns are all good and valid. The scary thought of innkeepers being turned loose on a blog without any real direction
was why I wrote this bit on B&B Blogs a while back..
swirt said:
The teacher in me thought about making a series of multiple choice questions for a test and based on the score would tell them whether they should have a blog or not. You fail... no blog for you LOL
Ah, yes, it's not the soup Nazi, it's the blog Nazi.
But if you have those questions, it's a great way to explain it to someone wanting to dive in.
 

swirt

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Just posting something there once a month just isn't going to cut it.
I disagree. One post a month is 12 new pages a year (that's 84 new pages in the course of an avg 7year stint as an innkeeper). Now if that one post a month is nothing more than a long rant about going to the store and not finding the right kind of flour for baking and the right kind of toilet paper, then you are right, it is an utter waste of time.
However, If it is a suggested itnerary for a seasonal visit to your area, or a restaurant review, or a description of an area attraction, or history of something in your area... then go for it. In my opinion one really good post a month is much better than 20 posts about drivel.
When you start casting a bigger and broader "fishing net," you never know what you're going to catch. Over the past few years I've had 6 different people make reservations because they read the tale of my timberframe gazebo construction in a non-inn related blog and wanted to come see the results. They were some of the most fun guests because they had interests in the same thing I did.
We all know people don't even read the inn's web site!!!! So why would someone take time for a blog???
We all know that not everyone reads the website, but that is not the same thing as no one reads the website. (they sound almost the same, but they aren't)
There are lots of times when people will quote things that they read on our site, that I don't even recall writing, but sure enough, they're on their. Some people read through everything, even though lots don't.
My wine blog (which I haven't updated in a year) brought in ~100 visitors in the past year and has a 5% conversion rate .... that is better than some directories.
They may not start on my site and go to my blog, more often than not they start on the blog and come to my site.
Is this only for search engine's sake??
Nope, its for the sake of all the paying guests that the search engines bring in.

Now all that being said... I have seen some horendous blogs created by innkeepers who were told at some conference or by someone that they have to have a blog, and then go create useless posts or worse yet posts that would actually make people run the other way. So they have to have some focus and some idea of what they are doing. ... The teacher in me thought about making a series of multiple choice questions for a test and based on the score would tell them whether they should have a blog or not. You fail... no blog for you LOL
Your questions and concerns are all good and valid. The scary thought of innkeepers being turned loose on a blog without any real direction
was why I wrote this bit on B&B Blogs a while back..
swirt said:
The teacher in me thought about making a series of multiple choice questions for a test and based on the score would tell them whether they should have a blog or not. You fail... no blog for you LOL
Ah, yes, it's not the soup Nazi, it's the blog Nazi.
But if you have those questions, it's a great way to explain it to someone wanting to dive in.
.
Ah, yes, it's not the soup Nazi, it's the blog Nazi.
You would be amazed at how much time is spent as webdesigner in this niche protecting innkeepers from themselves.
 

EmptyNest

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Joined
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Just posting something there once a month just isn't going to cut it.
I disagree. One post a month is 12 new pages a year (that's 84 new pages in the course of an avg 7year stint as an innkeeper). Now if that one post a month is nothing more than a long rant about going to the store and not finding the right kind of flour for baking and the right kind of toilet paper, then you are right, it is an utter waste of time.
However, If it is a suggested itnerary for a seasonal visit to your area, or a restaurant review, or a description of an area attraction, or history of something in your area... then go for it. In my opinion one really good post a month is much better than 20 posts about drivel.
When you start casting a bigger and broader "fishing net," you never know what you're going to catch. Over the past few years I've had 6 different people make reservations because they read the tale of my timberframe gazebo construction in a non-inn related blog and wanted to come see the results. They were some of the most fun guests because they had interests in the same thing I did.
We all know people don't even read the inn's web site!!!! So why would someone take time for a blog???
We all know that not everyone reads the website, but that is not the same thing as no one reads the website. (they sound almost the same, but they aren't)
There are lots of times when people will quote things that they read on our site, that I don't even recall writing, but sure enough, they're on their. Some people read through everything, even though lots don't.
My wine blog (which I haven't updated in a year) brought in ~100 visitors in the past year and has a 5% conversion rate .... that is better than some directories.
They may not start on my site and go to my blog, more often than not they start on the blog and come to my site.
Is this only for search engine's sake??
Nope, its for the sake of all the paying guests that the search engines bring in.

Now all that being said... I have seen some horendous blogs created by innkeepers who were told at some conference or by someone that they have to have a blog, and then go create useless posts or worse yet posts that would actually make people run the other way. So they have to have some focus and some idea of what they are doing. ... The teacher in me thought about making a series of multiple choice questions for a test and based on the score would tell them whether they should have a blog or not. You fail... no blog for you LOL
Your questions and concerns are all good and valid. The scary thought of innkeepers being turned loose on a blog without any real direction
was why I wrote this bit on B&B Blogs a while back..
I have seen some horendous blogs created by innkeepers who were told at some conference or by someone that they have to have a blog, and then go create useless posts or worse yet posts that would actually make people run the other way.
I agree with you SWIRT..it is the horrendous ones that cause me the grief. Just doing it because someone said you should...doesn't make for a good blog.
 

EmptyNest

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My take on it, especially if it means less work for YOU as the web guru!
  • Great place for the innkeeper to post specials and things to do in the area;
  • Great place for the innkeeper to keep in touch with guests;
  • Great place for the innkeeper to post PHOTOS of seasons;
  • The list goes on...
As far as how it helps overall, the more pages the website has (and I'm considering my blog as an extension of my website even tho it is not connected), the more chances someone will use the search term the innkeeper has blogged about.
You can SEO your webpages to death and have each page shine as far as a certain term goes, but you can't make the guest use THAT term to find you.
If your innkeepers are sending newsletters, they can direct guests to the content on the blog. If they have FB and/or Twitter (and I'm guessing not), the blog can get out to those subscribers as well.
It's just an easy way for the innkeeper without coding skills to make new content and share it immediately. A webpage may take months to show in searches, a blog is there NOW.
You know these innkeepers well and you know what they will and won't do on their own. BUT, telling them to block out 20 minutes on a Monday morning to blog about something interesting coming up in the next month or so is something they CAN do. And once some guest books and says, 'I saw it on your blog,' they'll get hooked.
Don't know who they heard speak, but Blogger is the one I use because it's easy and free. If you can type, you can blog.
One thing to make sure they understand, tho, is that the blog may be the first thing the guest sees, so it had better be 'polished' and not filled with typos, grammar errors, etc.
If any of them want a 'second opinion' on blogging, feel free to tell them to call or email me. I will happily tell them how much time it takes in a week for me to blog and what's involved..
One more thing, after reading that article...my purpose. Why I do this is multi-fold. I do it for the reasons mentioned -getting the word out, keeping in touch, adding quality content. But I also do it for me. I blog because I think I have something to say. Yes, totally self-centered on that one, but those blogs are the ones that get responses!
If you look to see what blogs have comments, they are usually the ones I wrote about something totally unrelated to the inn, but they struck a chord with guests. A beautiful coastline, taking time to 'be' with your family, my snowshoeing accident.
For the most part, not about the inn at all.
They do need to determine the purpose. Is it a 'chatty' blog because guests really want to know about the day to day? A 'tourist info center' blog about what to do? Having a purpose is good, but it need not be narrow. It should be focused on their guests, tho. So, they need first to know what kind of guests they have and want and write to them.
I try to picture one particular guest when I write some of the blogs. I write to that person.
.
Yep you echo my sentiments exactly. The problem is..folks I know personally...and I know they will not be keeping these updated. I have seen it in non-action already. And those who do post, are posting dull as dishwater stuff that I personally don't care to read.
You say you have kept your blog outside of your domain. ...the "experts" say you shouldn't...that is I guess what is bothering me as well.
If you have lots of links to your site and links to good stories, events etc..what difference does it actually make. Maybe SWIRT can speak to the technical side of it.
Experts say WORDPRESS is easy to use..but...most innkeeper ( not those here...) don't have a clue about installation, set up etc...they would have to have their hosting company so that.
.
I have been struggling for weeks to get my blog as a subdomain on my site. Apparently my hosting company doesn't want to play ball with Google. Swirt found another solution for me to try and I'll get to it this weekend.
It's not that I'm deliberately not doing it, I'm being stymied in my attempts.
I know you mentioned how your gang didn't keep up the blog on the group site, maybe they just needed another push in the right direction.
What I was thinking of was for the less technical innkeepers who don't maintain their own sites. If they want to add a new event, it means sending an email to the web guru, waiting in line, perhaps paying out $ for the extra info. At least that's what the guy who was doing the site here for the PO's told me...$35 for each new photo, $25 for new text, $100 for a new page, etc. (And $200/month for making sure the site didn't disappear. Hmmm? Sounds like extortion to me, too.)
It depends on which expert you listen to what's easy and what isn't. I've heard 2 completely different experts in the past 2 weeks say 2 completely different things. I tend to side with the expert who says to use the platform that requires NO intervention from the user. With Blogger, I blog. I let Google worry about everything else. If I understood correctly, WordPress requires maintenance from the user ala updating the code when new releases come out. If the hosting company takes care of that for free, fine. If it's up to the user, not fine.
Like I said, feel free to have any of them call me as I'm a real innkeeper doing it in real time and not an 'expert!'
.
Morticia..I hadn't seen your blog in a long time. You are doing it well. Congrats..looks great!
 

swirt

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Joined
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My take on it, especially if it means less work for YOU as the web guru!
  • Great place for the innkeeper to post specials and things to do in the area;
  • Great place for the innkeeper to keep in touch with guests;
  • Great place for the innkeeper to post PHOTOS of seasons;
  • The list goes on...
As far as how it helps overall, the more pages the website has (and I'm considering my blog as an extension of my website even tho it is not connected), the more chances someone will use the search term the innkeeper has blogged about.
You can SEO your webpages to death and have each page shine as far as a certain term goes, but you can't make the guest use THAT term to find you.
If your innkeepers are sending newsletters, they can direct guests to the content on the blog. If they have FB and/or Twitter (and I'm guessing not), the blog can get out to those subscribers as well.
It's just an easy way for the innkeeper without coding skills to make new content and share it immediately. A webpage may take months to show in searches, a blog is there NOW.
You know these innkeepers well and you know what they will and won't do on their own. BUT, telling them to block out 20 minutes on a Monday morning to blog about something interesting coming up in the next month or so is something they CAN do. And once some guest books and says, 'I saw it on your blog,' they'll get hooked.
Don't know who they heard speak, but Blogger is the one I use because it's easy and free. If you can type, you can blog.
One thing to make sure they understand, tho, is that the blog may be the first thing the guest sees, so it had better be 'polished' and not filled with typos, grammar errors, etc.
If any of them want a 'second opinion' on blogging, feel free to tell them to call or email me. I will happily tell them how much time it takes in a week for me to blog and what's involved..
One more thing, after reading that article...my purpose. Why I do this is multi-fold. I do it for the reasons mentioned -getting the word out, keeping in touch, adding quality content. But I also do it for me. I blog because I think I have something to say. Yes, totally self-centered on that one, but those blogs are the ones that get responses!
If you look to see what blogs have comments, they are usually the ones I wrote about something totally unrelated to the inn, but they struck a chord with guests. A beautiful coastline, taking time to 'be' with your family, my snowshoeing accident.
For the most part, not about the inn at all.
They do need to determine the purpose. Is it a 'chatty' blog because guests really want to know about the day to day? A 'tourist info center' blog about what to do? Having a purpose is good, but it need not be narrow. It should be focused on their guests, tho. So, they need first to know what kind of guests they have and want and write to them.
I try to picture one particular guest when I write some of the blogs. I write to that person.
.
Yep you echo my sentiments exactly. The problem is..folks I know personally...and I know they will not be keeping these updated. I have seen it in non-action already. And those who do post, are posting dull as dishwater stuff that I personally don't care to read.
You say you have kept your blog outside of your domain. ...the "experts" say you shouldn't...that is I guess what is bothering me as well.
If you have lots of links to your site and links to good stories, events etc..what difference does it actually make. Maybe SWIRT can speak to the technical side of it.
Experts say WORDPRESS is easy to use..but...most innkeeper ( not those here...) don't have a clue about installation, set up etc...they would have to have their hosting company so that.
.
You say you have kept your blog outside of your domain. ...the "experts" say you shouldn't...that is I guess what is bothering me as well.
If you have lots of links to your site and links to good stories, events etc..what difference does it actually make. Maybe SWIRT can speak to the technical side of it.
I know I've had this discussion on here before ... it is a long drawn out thing ... let me see if I can go find it. (toodles off to find a shovel)
.
Here they are spread across three different threads
  1. Which platform and configuration (keep in mind this an older thread and was written before Wordpress developed the ability to update itself) (Also if you read further down the thread, I refer to "hacking" meaning someone breaking in and messing with your site, but when Lisa refers to hacking, she means customising.)
  2. Subdomain blog as empire building (this one is really good in its entirety)
  3. More on Blogger or Wordpress subdomain vs directory
For the short version if I was starting a new "inn specific blog" I would chose to run it as a subdirectory www,mysite.com/blogdirectory/ This setup is not possible with Blogger so it Wordpress would be required. This is for a NEW blog. I am not suggesting that anyone run out and alter their existing setup.
I do recommend taht if you have an existing blogger blog that you do assign a domain name to it. Either as a subdomain (myblog.mysite.com) or as its own domain (www,myblogname.com) This is more for branding and control reasons that anything else.
 

Morticia

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Just posting something there once a month just isn't going to cut it.
I disagree. One post a month is 12 new pages a year (that's 84 new pages in the course of an avg 7year stint as an innkeeper). Now if that one post a month is nothing more than a long rant about going to the store and not finding the right kind of flour for baking and the right kind of toilet paper, then you are right, it is an utter waste of time.
However, If it is a suggested itnerary for a seasonal visit to your area, or a restaurant review, or a description of an area attraction, or history of something in your area... then go for it. In my opinion one really good post a month is much better than 20 posts about drivel.
When you start casting a bigger and broader "fishing net," you never know what you're going to catch. Over the past few years I've had 6 different people make reservations because they read the tale of my timberframe gazebo construction in a non-inn related blog and wanted to come see the results. They were some of the most fun guests because they had interests in the same thing I did.
We all know people don't even read the inn's web site!!!! So why would someone take time for a blog???
We all know that not everyone reads the website, but that is not the same thing as no one reads the website. (they sound almost the same, but they aren't)
There are lots of times when people will quote things that they read on our site, that I don't even recall writing, but sure enough, they're on their. Some people read through everything, even though lots don't.
My wine blog (which I haven't updated in a year) brought in ~100 visitors in the past year and has a 5% conversion rate .... that is better than some directories.
They may not start on my site and go to my blog, more often than not they start on the blog and come to my site.
Is this only for search engine's sake??
Nope, its for the sake of all the paying guests that the search engines bring in.

Now all that being said... I have seen some horendous blogs created by innkeepers who were told at some conference or by someone that they have to have a blog, and then go create useless posts or worse yet posts that would actually make people run the other way. So they have to have some focus and some idea of what they are doing. ... The teacher in me thought about making a series of multiple choice questions for a test and based on the score would tell them whether they should have a blog or not. You fail... no blog for you LOL
Your questions and concerns are all good and valid. The scary thought of innkeepers being turned loose on a blog without any real direction
was why I wrote this bit on B&B Blogs a while back..
swirt said:
The teacher in me thought about making a series of multiple choice questions for a test and based on the score would tell them whether they should have a blog or not. You fail... no blog for you LOL
Ah, yes, it's not the soup Nazi, it's the blog Nazi.
But if you have those questions, it's a great way to explain it to someone wanting to dive in.
.
Ah, yes, it's not the soup Nazi, it's the blog Nazi.
You would be amazed at how much time is spent as webdesigner in this niche protecting innkeepers from themselves.
.
Maybe I don't give myself enough credit, then. I figure, if I can do this, just about anyone can. But, I guess just about everyone shouldn't. I can think of a few people who do who shouldn't, but it doesn't seem to hurt them any.
 

Morticia

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My take on it, especially if it means less work for YOU as the web guru!
  • Great place for the innkeeper to post specials and things to do in the area;
  • Great place for the innkeeper to keep in touch with guests;
  • Great place for the innkeeper to post PHOTOS of seasons;
  • The list goes on...
As far as how it helps overall, the more pages the website has (and I'm considering my blog as an extension of my website even tho it is not connected), the more chances someone will use the search term the innkeeper has blogged about.
You can SEO your webpages to death and have each page shine as far as a certain term goes, but you can't make the guest use THAT term to find you.
If your innkeepers are sending newsletters, they can direct guests to the content on the blog. If they have FB and/or Twitter (and I'm guessing not), the blog can get out to those subscribers as well.
It's just an easy way for the innkeeper without coding skills to make new content and share it immediately. A webpage may take months to show in searches, a blog is there NOW.
You know these innkeepers well and you know what they will and won't do on their own. BUT, telling them to block out 20 minutes on a Monday morning to blog about something interesting coming up in the next month or so is something they CAN do. And once some guest books and says, 'I saw it on your blog,' they'll get hooked.
Don't know who they heard speak, but Blogger is the one I use because it's easy and free. If you can type, you can blog.
One thing to make sure they understand, tho, is that the blog may be the first thing the guest sees, so it had better be 'polished' and not filled with typos, grammar errors, etc.
If any of them want a 'second opinion' on blogging, feel free to tell them to call or email me. I will happily tell them how much time it takes in a week for me to blog and what's involved..
One more thing, after reading that article...my purpose. Why I do this is multi-fold. I do it for the reasons mentioned -getting the word out, keeping in touch, adding quality content. But I also do it for me. I blog because I think I have something to say. Yes, totally self-centered on that one, but those blogs are the ones that get responses!
If you look to see what blogs have comments, they are usually the ones I wrote about something totally unrelated to the inn, but they struck a chord with guests. A beautiful coastline, taking time to 'be' with your family, my snowshoeing accident.
For the most part, not about the inn at all.
They do need to determine the purpose. Is it a 'chatty' blog because guests really want to know about the day to day? A 'tourist info center' blog about what to do? Having a purpose is good, but it need not be narrow. It should be focused on their guests, tho. So, they need first to know what kind of guests they have and want and write to them.
I try to picture one particular guest when I write some of the blogs. I write to that person.
.
Yep you echo my sentiments exactly. The problem is..folks I know personally...and I know they will not be keeping these updated. I have seen it in non-action already. And those who do post, are posting dull as dishwater stuff that I personally don't care to read.
You say you have kept your blog outside of your domain. ...the "experts" say you shouldn't...that is I guess what is bothering me as well.
If you have lots of links to your site and links to good stories, events etc..what difference does it actually make. Maybe SWIRT can speak to the technical side of it.
Experts say WORDPRESS is easy to use..but...most innkeeper ( not those here...) don't have a clue about installation, set up etc...they would have to have their hosting company so that.
.
I have been struggling for weeks to get my blog as a subdomain on my site. Apparently my hosting company doesn't want to play ball with Google. Swirt found another solution for me to try and I'll get to it this weekend.
It's not that I'm deliberately not doing it, I'm being stymied in my attempts.
I know you mentioned how your gang didn't keep up the blog on the group site, maybe they just needed another push in the right direction.
What I was thinking of was for the less technical innkeepers who don't maintain their own sites. If they want to add a new event, it means sending an email to the web guru, waiting in line, perhaps paying out $ for the extra info. At least that's what the guy who was doing the site here for the PO's told me...$35 for each new photo, $25 for new text, $100 for a new page, etc. (And $200/month for making sure the site didn't disappear. Hmmm? Sounds like extortion to me, too.)
It depends on which expert you listen to what's easy and what isn't. I've heard 2 completely different experts in the past 2 weeks say 2 completely different things. I tend to side with the expert who says to use the platform that requires NO intervention from the user. With Blogger, I blog. I let Google worry about everything else. If I understood correctly, WordPress requires maintenance from the user ala updating the code when new releases come out. If the hosting company takes care of that for free, fine. If it's up to the user, not fine.
Like I said, feel free to have any of them call me as I'm a real innkeeper doing it in real time and not an 'expert!'
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Morticia..I hadn't seen your blog in a long time. You are doing it well. Congrats..looks great!
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Thanks. I'm more committed this year than before. I have some new, non-innkeeping friends who keep me interested in stuff. (OK, that didn't come out right, but you know what I mean...I'm expanding my horizons with new friends who also blog.)
 

four at four forty four

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i have a blog that is a really nice blend of 'me' and my business. i post everyday ... or try too...
i talk about whatever inspires me... recipes, design, other blogs, my favorite things from the new crate and barrel catalog... i take pictures....its a very happy place. don't talk about my guests or anything. it is in no way 'bed and breakfast' specific. though, you can access the blog through my b&b website.
i have a gift shoppe here too.. so i have giveaways as well.
i blog to give myself a voice. to share what i love. to see what people think about what i love. people comment and it's great. i love it.
has it drasticlly improved my business. i don't know? but it has helped me connect on a different level. meet new people. it does take time, but for me, its worth it.
 
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