Can I have a look at the room first?

INNspiring.com | Innkeeper Forum & Innkeeping Resources

Help Support INNspiring.com | Innkeeper Forum & Innkeeping Resources:

Mini

Well-known member
Joined
Aug 7, 2008
Messages
269
Reaction score
0
I know we have all had them....guests who made the reservation a month earlier and still arrive and say CAN I HAVE A LOOK AT THE ROOM FIRST.
Then I panic thinking perhaps they did not like the look of the outside or the entrance or what? Or is it just those kind of people who always want to see the room first.
Today I had a group of seven ladies arrive, they booked one month earlier. They arrive, with frowns, wanting to see their rooms first. Then someone shouted "Well what do you think girls, should we stay"? The answer was yes thank GOD! But, do they really have a choice? What if they had said "No we'll try somewhere else". Three rooms. Would I just let them go on their merry way or remind them of our cancellation policy.
I get very few guests asking to see their room first. In fact I cannot remember when the last time was, but I mean they booked online and viewed the room on the website when they booked. I really am not sure what I would say to them if they didn't want to stay.
I would hate to have someone stay against their will.
 

gillumhouse

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Supporting Member
Joined
May 22, 2008
Messages
15,673
Reaction score
315
I have actually had that happen - except he did not even want to see the room. He pulled in with his trailer full of motorcycles ON MY GRASS, got out and told me I was too far away. It was a 3-night rez for a big event that he booked 2 months earlier.
I told him I was going to charge him for that night regardless - so they stayed that night. Should have told him get out of my yard. He was more trouble than he was worth. Today I would tell him goodbye and I am billing for the 3-nights.
Yes, if they say no, remind them of cancel policy. Also remind them the hotel would not show the room first and would charge - period. There are times to be hard-nosed.
 

seashanty

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jun 2, 2008
Messages
5,721
Reaction score
50
my first year in business, my first month ... a whole house (eight rooms) of wedding guests booked way in advance. and all 10 rooms in the little hotel across the road.
GUESS WHAT? we were (still are) the only options for room rentals in the town.
one woman was so unhappy with everything. she said, loudly and cruelly, to a friend who had just checked in across the road ... 'is your place as bad as this?' and her friend said (equally obnoxious) 'actually, this place is nicer'. i was so sad! she told me she was going to try to find another place 'more suitable' in the area. while she was gone, the bride to be called and apologized for her boorish friends. said that she had TOLD them it was a little harbor village, that they had been told not to expect the four seasons.
they all calmed down and had fun, no more complaints, but i just felt really bad the whole weekend .... that complainer was the person (if anyone remembers) who locked herself in her room and couldn't get out. this was the problem ...

we had to talk her out of the room. she had never seen a lock like that. funny, she managed to lock it.
 

Morticia

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Joined
May 22, 2008
Messages
17,492
Reaction score
368
The problem with this attitude is that they do not understand they have a 'contract' with you. They booked, you held the rooms, they owe you whether they stay or not. My take would be, 'I certainly hope you find a place you will like, however, I will charge you for these rooms if other guests do not arrive to take your places. These rooms were held and our cancellation policies explained in your confirmation letter.'
I don't mind guests looking at the rooms first. But, they're not getting out of paying. Everything here is clean, well-kept and well-managed. Think first before you book!
 

Copperhead

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 24, 2008
Messages
5,968
Reaction score
0
I have no problem showing a room to a walk in, but those that have researched, checked out my website, took the time to book - quite probably spoke with me. They know what they were booking and where. They would have to have some very good reason that my room like the AC was not working and no room to move them to in order for me to back down on my policies.
And once they ARE here, them leaving would be an early departure and I charge for the full reservation for early departures. Clearly stated in my policies.
I have had only one such experience (mentioned here before) where the person came in and went to their room (self check in). We never met the guy. He left the key in his room and we had no idea he had not stayed the night until I went in to freshen his room the next day. Room untouched. He was charged for his full stay! He had his travel agent call telling me he had missed his flight and was not here. Then HE called stating he thought we were a hotel when it was booked. Then another excuse. I never backed down. Thought I would get a chargeback, but guess he thought better.
Stick to your guns!
 

Samster

Well-known member
Joined
May 30, 2008
Messages
6,475
Reaction score
14
Location
South Carolina
We had a couple of those, but rare. I think sometimes that some of those folks want to make sure their room is like the photos on your website. Thankfully, we had a good web designer and the photos looked just like the rooms. Some others might be first time B&B guests who just need some reassurance. Then, there are the snots who are just trying to make your life difficult.
 

domsmom

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 19, 2010
Messages
180
Reaction score
0
I did a little research a couple years ago and found that if someone books 25% of a major hotel they have a 60 day cancellation policy. My 2 weeks suddenly seems lenient. I have explained to guests that they reserved the room (s) and they were unavailable for anyone else and had anyone else inquired during that time and told the room(s) were not available, they found accommodation elsewhere.
I recently had an entire family book all 4 of my rooms for a graduation. They were not due in until 3pm. One member arrived at 9:15am. I was not home, I was at the supermarket shopping for 8 guests for 3 days, in order to prepare fruit baskets and such. In all honesty, my home was in disarray as I knew when to expect them and what needed to be done prior to 3pm. So the guy who arrived at 9:15 was unhappy that I was not here, wanted a complete refund, insisted that no one stay with me, he was the "chief" in his community (chief of what I still don't know), that neighbors were "eyeing his Hummer", all of this was said over the phone and took up much of my work time. His sister who booked the rooms asked to check the place out and would be arriving at 2pm. A small miracle of life occurred and by 2pm all was beautiful in my little b&b. The sister and her husband, the other sister and her husband and niece could not figure out the brother's problem. Spent a delightful weekend with me (thank goodness I never met the evil brother) and wrote lovely notes in the journal even saying they would recommend me to others.
This happened 6 weeks ago and almost posted something that week, but it was still too fresh and intimidating.
This leads me to a question: What do YOU do about the person who shows up at 9:15 expecting a room when you aren't expecting them til check in time?
 

JBloggs

Moderator
Moderator
Joined
Oct 7, 2008
Messages
17,743
Reaction score
0
That is the thing, isn't it, if you have a nice website, who do they think controls that? Is it just by a fluke all this online marketing. Having had the worst room of all time on Friday, I can concur, if you ain't happy, LEAVE! Do us all a favor, go!
I am so not into that, I would immediately be irritated with those ladies.
 

JBloggs

Moderator
Moderator
Joined
Oct 7, 2008
Messages
17,743
Reaction score
0
Doms, I won't let anyone in until check in time. It is one of those rules I have to force myself to keep in play, when we bedn to every whim of every guest we have NO LIFE. NONE WHATSOEVER. Right now having lunch and might go for a swim, if they show up early, the door is locked. They have the check in time.
 

wendydk

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 7, 2009
Messages
1,656
Reaction score
0
I did a little research a couple years ago and found that if someone books 25% of a major hotel they have a 60 day cancellation policy. My 2 weeks suddenly seems lenient. I have explained to guests that they reserved the room (s) and they were unavailable for anyone else and had anyone else inquired during that time and told the room(s) were not available, they found accommodation elsewhere.
I recently had an entire family book all 4 of my rooms for a graduation. They were not due in until 3pm. One member arrived at 9:15am. I was not home, I was at the supermarket shopping for 8 guests for 3 days, in order to prepare fruit baskets and such. In all honesty, my home was in disarray as I knew when to expect them and what needed to be done prior to 3pm. So the guy who arrived at 9:15 was unhappy that I was not here, wanted a complete refund, insisted that no one stay with me, he was the "chief" in his community (chief of what I still don't know), that neighbors were "eyeing his Hummer", all of this was said over the phone and took up much of my work time. His sister who booked the rooms asked to check the place out and would be arriving at 2pm. A small miracle of life occurred and by 2pm all was beautiful in my little b&b. The sister and her husband, the other sister and her husband and niece could not figure out the brother's problem. Spent a delightful weekend with me (thank goodness I never met the evil brother) and wrote lovely notes in the journal even saying they would recommend me to others.
This happened 6 weeks ago and almost posted something that week, but it was still too fresh and intimidating.
This leads me to a question: What do YOU do about the person who shows up at 9:15 expecting a room when you aren't expecting them til check in time?.
domsmom said:
What do YOU do about the person who shows up at 9:15 expecting a room when you aren't expecting them til check in time?
At 9:15am, guests here would be in the middle of breakfast, and anyone coming to the door would see everyone sitting there eating!
 

seashanty

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jun 2, 2008
Messages
5,721
Reaction score
50
more signs ... i had signs on the door about checkin time ... still had guests let in other people who would walk in while i was cooking and serving breakfast and i would tell them i was flying solo, that the rooms were still occupied and i would be happy to see them at 3 pm. i assumed these are folks who usually stay at a hotel or large places ... first they are hoping for an early checkin and second they are stunned to find no one around ... they don't realize that shopping has to be done by SOMEONE, etc.

at least the rest of the folks were happy (even though the arrived EARLY)
 

Joey Camb

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 2, 2010
Messages
4,793
Reaction score
0
We allow early check in (if the room is ready or if they book an early check in) We have guests for weddings and if they check in after the reception then that is late I would rather they come at 11am and I don't have to see them till the next morning for breakfast than say no and then I have to deal with them later. We have had people join us for breakfast (we charge for the extra breakfast) but nothing makes me crosser than people who come early and expect the room to be ready. SOmetimes they just come to ask if it is ok to leave the car etc which is fine also. I also have the bad luck that when I have all the duvets on the floor out of the cupboard and reception is a mess then that is when everyone tries to check in. It's like a bat signal!
 

JBloggs

Moderator
Moderator
Joined
Oct 7, 2008
Messages
17,743
Reaction score
0
Charge for an early check in, you will find those same people rethinking getting there before check in time. :)
 

Morticia

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Joined
May 22, 2008
Messages
17,492
Reaction score
368
I did a little research a couple years ago and found that if someone books 25% of a major hotel they have a 60 day cancellation policy. My 2 weeks suddenly seems lenient. I have explained to guests that they reserved the room (s) and they were unavailable for anyone else and had anyone else inquired during that time and told the room(s) were not available, they found accommodation elsewhere.
I recently had an entire family book all 4 of my rooms for a graduation. They were not due in until 3pm. One member arrived at 9:15am. I was not home, I was at the supermarket shopping for 8 guests for 3 days, in order to prepare fruit baskets and such. In all honesty, my home was in disarray as I knew when to expect them and what needed to be done prior to 3pm. So the guy who arrived at 9:15 was unhappy that I was not here, wanted a complete refund, insisted that no one stay with me, he was the "chief" in his community (chief of what I still don't know), that neighbors were "eyeing his Hummer", all of this was said over the phone and took up much of my work time. His sister who booked the rooms asked to check the place out and would be arriving at 2pm. A small miracle of life occurred and by 2pm all was beautiful in my little b&b. The sister and her husband, the other sister and her husband and niece could not figure out the brother's problem. Spent a delightful weekend with me (thank goodness I never met the evil brother) and wrote lovely notes in the journal even saying they would recommend me to others.
This happened 6 weeks ago and almost posted something that week, but it was still too fresh and intimidating.
This leads me to a question: What do YOU do about the person who shows up at 9:15 expecting a room when you aren't expecting them til check in time?.
domsmom said:
This leads me to a question: What do YOU do about the person who shows up at 9:15 expecting a room when you aren't expecting them til check in time?
From the sound of it, he got into the house. So, first thing I would do is make sure the door is locked when you don't want anyone in the house.
The next thing, if you are home, is to let the guest know they are not expected until 3 PM and the house is not ready, still have guests from last night (true or not), the 'day' of their arrival does not start until 3 PM, so if they want to stay right now (at 9:15) they will need to pay for the previous night as well.
Generally I open the door slightly and say, 'I'm sorry you're a bit early. We're not ready, please come back at 3 PM, here's a list of things to do until then.'
 

domsmom

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 19, 2010
Messages
180
Reaction score
0
I did a little research a couple years ago and found that if someone books 25% of a major hotel they have a 60 day cancellation policy. My 2 weeks suddenly seems lenient. I have explained to guests that they reserved the room (s) and they were unavailable for anyone else and had anyone else inquired during that time and told the room(s) were not available, they found accommodation elsewhere.
I recently had an entire family book all 4 of my rooms for a graduation. They were not due in until 3pm. One member arrived at 9:15am. I was not home, I was at the supermarket shopping for 8 guests for 3 days, in order to prepare fruit baskets and such. In all honesty, my home was in disarray as I knew when to expect them and what needed to be done prior to 3pm. So the guy who arrived at 9:15 was unhappy that I was not here, wanted a complete refund, insisted that no one stay with me, he was the "chief" in his community (chief of what I still don't know), that neighbors were "eyeing his Hummer", all of this was said over the phone and took up much of my work time. His sister who booked the rooms asked to check the place out and would be arriving at 2pm. A small miracle of life occurred and by 2pm all was beautiful in my little b&b. The sister and her husband, the other sister and her husband and niece could not figure out the brother's problem. Spent a delightful weekend with me (thank goodness I never met the evil brother) and wrote lovely notes in the journal even saying they would recommend me to others.
This happened 6 weeks ago and almost posted something that week, but it was still too fresh and intimidating.
This leads me to a question: What do YOU do about the person who shows up at 9:15 expecting a room when you aren't expecting them til check in time?.
domsmom said:
What do YOU do about the person who shows up at 9:15 expecting a room when you aren't expecting them til check in time?
At 9:15am, guests here would be in the middle of breakfast, and anyone coming to the door would see everyone sitting there eating!
.
That particular morning I did not have any guests, I did have 3 kids who had to get off to school, hence the disarray. I often thought though, if I had guests that morning, it would have been terribly uncomfortable to be serving breakfast and all of a sudden have someone arrive who I was not expecting for several hours.
 

domsmom

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 19, 2010
Messages
180
Reaction score
0
I did a little research a couple years ago and found that if someone books 25% of a major hotel they have a 60 day cancellation policy. My 2 weeks suddenly seems lenient. I have explained to guests that they reserved the room (s) and they were unavailable for anyone else and had anyone else inquired during that time and told the room(s) were not available, they found accommodation elsewhere.
I recently had an entire family book all 4 of my rooms for a graduation. They were not due in until 3pm. One member arrived at 9:15am. I was not home, I was at the supermarket shopping for 8 guests for 3 days, in order to prepare fruit baskets and such. In all honesty, my home was in disarray as I knew when to expect them and what needed to be done prior to 3pm. So the guy who arrived at 9:15 was unhappy that I was not here, wanted a complete refund, insisted that no one stay with me, he was the "chief" in his community (chief of what I still don't know), that neighbors were "eyeing his Hummer", all of this was said over the phone and took up much of my work time. His sister who booked the rooms asked to check the place out and would be arriving at 2pm. A small miracle of life occurred and by 2pm all was beautiful in my little b&b. The sister and her husband, the other sister and her husband and niece could not figure out the brother's problem. Spent a delightful weekend with me (thank goodness I never met the evil brother) and wrote lovely notes in the journal even saying they would recommend me to others.
This happened 6 weeks ago and almost posted something that week, but it was still too fresh and intimidating.
This leads me to a question: What do YOU do about the person who shows up at 9:15 expecting a room when you aren't expecting them til check in time?.
domsmom said:
This leads me to a question: What do YOU do about the person who shows up at 9:15 expecting a room when you aren't expecting them til check in time?
From the sound of it, he got into the house. So, first thing I would do is make sure the door is locked when you don't want anyone in the house.
The next thing, if you are home, is to let the guest know they are not expected until 3 PM and the house is not ready, still have guests from last night (true or not), the 'day' of their arrival does not start until 3 PM, so if they want to stay right now (at 9:15) they will need to pay for the previous night as well.
Generally I open the door slightly and say, 'I'm sorry you're a bit early. We're not ready, please come back at 3 PM, here's a list of things to do until then.'
.
Actually, he did not get in the house, he just peeked into every window he could find. I was actually relieved that he did not stay. I don't have the luxury of an owner's apartment, but I do have areas of the house "roped off" though the guests have a lounge the dining room, their rooms and other open space to congregate. I like to be flexible because one of the hardest parts of this job for me is WAITING. I would rather get someone settled at 3 (though my check in time is 4) and then the afternoon/evening are mine. Waiting for people to arrive is like waiting for the phone to ring. Thank you for the suggestions and I will likely be implementing them SOONER rather than later.
 

Morticia

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Joined
May 22, 2008
Messages
17,492
Reaction score
368
I did a little research a couple years ago and found that if someone books 25% of a major hotel they have a 60 day cancellation policy. My 2 weeks suddenly seems lenient. I have explained to guests that they reserved the room (s) and they were unavailable for anyone else and had anyone else inquired during that time and told the room(s) were not available, they found accommodation elsewhere.
I recently had an entire family book all 4 of my rooms for a graduation. They were not due in until 3pm. One member arrived at 9:15am. I was not home, I was at the supermarket shopping for 8 guests for 3 days, in order to prepare fruit baskets and such. In all honesty, my home was in disarray as I knew when to expect them and what needed to be done prior to 3pm. So the guy who arrived at 9:15 was unhappy that I was not here, wanted a complete refund, insisted that no one stay with me, he was the "chief" in his community (chief of what I still don't know), that neighbors were "eyeing his Hummer", all of this was said over the phone and took up much of my work time. His sister who booked the rooms asked to check the place out and would be arriving at 2pm. A small miracle of life occurred and by 2pm all was beautiful in my little b&b. The sister and her husband, the other sister and her husband and niece could not figure out the brother's problem. Spent a delightful weekend with me (thank goodness I never met the evil brother) and wrote lovely notes in the journal even saying they would recommend me to others.
This happened 6 weeks ago and almost posted something that week, but it was still too fresh and intimidating.
This leads me to a question: What do YOU do about the person who shows up at 9:15 expecting a room when you aren't expecting them til check in time?.
domsmom said:
What do YOU do about the person who shows up at 9:15 expecting a room when you aren't expecting them til check in time?
At 9:15am, guests here would be in the middle of breakfast, and anyone coming to the door would see everyone sitting there eating!
.
That particular morning I did not have any guests, I did have 3 kids who had to get off to school, hence the disarray. I often thought though, if I had guests that morning, it would have been terribly uncomfortable to be serving breakfast and all of a sudden have someone arrive who I was not expecting for several hours.
.
This is why all of us set our limits. For whatever reason we just don't want new guests in until we've had a chance to safely see off the old ones or even so we have a nice, quiet morning to ourselves. I've been known to wander around in my jammies until noon if there are no guests in the house. WON'T answer the door in my jammies, go away early people!
 

Morticia

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Joined
May 22, 2008
Messages
17,492
Reaction score
368
I did a little research a couple years ago and found that if someone books 25% of a major hotel they have a 60 day cancellation policy. My 2 weeks suddenly seems lenient. I have explained to guests that they reserved the room (s) and they were unavailable for anyone else and had anyone else inquired during that time and told the room(s) were not available, they found accommodation elsewhere.
I recently had an entire family book all 4 of my rooms for a graduation. They were not due in until 3pm. One member arrived at 9:15am. I was not home, I was at the supermarket shopping for 8 guests for 3 days, in order to prepare fruit baskets and such. In all honesty, my home was in disarray as I knew when to expect them and what needed to be done prior to 3pm. So the guy who arrived at 9:15 was unhappy that I was not here, wanted a complete refund, insisted that no one stay with me, he was the "chief" in his community (chief of what I still don't know), that neighbors were "eyeing his Hummer", all of this was said over the phone and took up much of my work time. His sister who booked the rooms asked to check the place out and would be arriving at 2pm. A small miracle of life occurred and by 2pm all was beautiful in my little b&b. The sister and her husband, the other sister and her husband and niece could not figure out the brother's problem. Spent a delightful weekend with me (thank goodness I never met the evil brother) and wrote lovely notes in the journal even saying they would recommend me to others.
This happened 6 weeks ago and almost posted something that week, but it was still too fresh and intimidating.
This leads me to a question: What do YOU do about the person who shows up at 9:15 expecting a room when you aren't expecting them til check in time?.
domsmom said:
This leads me to a question: What do YOU do about the person who shows up at 9:15 expecting a room when you aren't expecting them til check in time?
From the sound of it, he got into the house. So, first thing I would do is make sure the door is locked when you don't want anyone in the house.
The next thing, if you are home, is to let the guest know they are not expected until 3 PM and the house is not ready, still have guests from last night (true or not), the 'day' of their arrival does not start until 3 PM, so if they want to stay right now (at 9:15) they will need to pay for the previous night as well.
Generally I open the door slightly and say, 'I'm sorry you're a bit early. We're not ready, please come back at 3 PM, here's a list of things to do until then.'
.
Actually, he did not get in the house, he just peeked into every window he could find. I was actually relieved that he did not stay. I don't have the luxury of an owner's apartment, but I do have areas of the house "roped off" though the guests have a lounge the dining room, their rooms and other open space to congregate. I like to be flexible because one of the hardest parts of this job for me is WAITING. I would rather get someone settled at 3 (though my check in time is 4) and then the afternoon/evening are mine. Waiting for people to arrive is like waiting for the phone to ring. Thank you for the suggestions and I will likely be implementing them SOONER rather than later.
.
OK, anyone who would peer in all of your windows is not the sort of person you would want anyway. Glad he went away!
 

domsmom

Well-known member
Joined
Mar 19, 2010
Messages
180
Reaction score
0
I did a little research a couple years ago and found that if someone books 25% of a major hotel they have a 60 day cancellation policy. My 2 weeks suddenly seems lenient. I have explained to guests that they reserved the room (s) and they were unavailable for anyone else and had anyone else inquired during that time and told the room(s) were not available, they found accommodation elsewhere.
I recently had an entire family book all 4 of my rooms for a graduation. They were not due in until 3pm. One member arrived at 9:15am. I was not home, I was at the supermarket shopping for 8 guests for 3 days, in order to prepare fruit baskets and such. In all honesty, my home was in disarray as I knew when to expect them and what needed to be done prior to 3pm. So the guy who arrived at 9:15 was unhappy that I was not here, wanted a complete refund, insisted that no one stay with me, he was the "chief" in his community (chief of what I still don't know), that neighbors were "eyeing his Hummer", all of this was said over the phone and took up much of my work time. His sister who booked the rooms asked to check the place out and would be arriving at 2pm. A small miracle of life occurred and by 2pm all was beautiful in my little b&b. The sister and her husband, the other sister and her husband and niece could not figure out the brother's problem. Spent a delightful weekend with me (thank goodness I never met the evil brother) and wrote lovely notes in the journal even saying they would recommend me to others.
This happened 6 weeks ago and almost posted something that week, but it was still too fresh and intimidating.
This leads me to a question: What do YOU do about the person who shows up at 9:15 expecting a room when you aren't expecting them til check in time?.
domsmom said:
What do YOU do about the person who shows up at 9:15 expecting a room when you aren't expecting them til check in time?
At 9:15am, guests here would be in the middle of breakfast, and anyone coming to the door would see everyone sitting there eating!
.
That particular morning I did not have any guests, I did have 3 kids who had to get off to school, hence the disarray. I often thought though, if I had guests that morning, it would have been terribly uncomfortable to be serving breakfast and all of a sudden have someone arrive who I was not expecting for several hours.
.
This is why all of us set our limits. For whatever reason we just don't want new guests in until we've had a chance to safely see off the old ones or even so we have a nice, quiet morning to ourselves. I've been known to wander around in my jammies until noon if there are no guests in the house. WON'T answer the door in my jammies, go away early people!
.

 

seashanty

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jun 2, 2008
Messages
5,721
Reaction score
50
exactly jb! hotels charge up to $50 for early check in.
 
Top