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oldcharm

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Does anyone have any 'nice' wording for a website to say that children under a certian age are.... 'not welcomed'. (even 'well-behaved' ones) I've owned my b&b for a year now and opening my home to children that are still in diapers or just out of them has been overly stressful and frustrating... and stinky. (some people have no manners) While I may make expections I want to keep it to a mimimun. Any suggestions?
 

Morticia

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Turn it around so it is positive, not negative. 'We welcome children over the age of 8 (10, 12, whatever).'
Keep in mind that once you post that, guests who DO read the website who do NOT want to meet up with the same kids you don't want to host will be upset to find the ones you made an exception for.
Also, you can put a maximum occupancy limit on your rooms which will limit, somewhat, the number of kids who may show up.
 

Breakfast Diva

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What area of the country are you located? If you're in CA, don't even try putting age limitations because it's illegal. As Bree suggested, a good way is to put your maximum occupancy on each room, especially if you're set up just for 2 in a room. An innkeeper friend of mine's response when they ask about infants or young kids is "do they have a heart beat? Then they're counted as a person. Maximum 2 to a room".
 

alias annie

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"I like children..... parboiled" adapted from WC Field's quote
 

Willowpondgj

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What area of the country are you located? If you're in CA, don't even try putting age limitations because it's illegal. As Bree suggested, a good way is to put your maximum occupancy on each room, especially if you're set up just for 2 in a room. An innkeeper friend of mine's response when they ask about infants or young kids is "do they have a heart beat? Then they're counted as a person. Maximum 2 to a room"..
I've seen a lot of B&B's in CA with age limits, maybe it depends on how many rooms and the zoning.
 

Breakfast Diva

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What area of the country are you located? If you're in CA, don't even try putting age limitations because it's illegal. As Bree suggested, a good way is to put your maximum occupancy on each room, especially if you're set up just for 2 in a room. An innkeeper friend of mine's response when they ask about infants or young kids is "do they have a heart beat? Then they're counted as a person. Maximum 2 to a room"..
I've seen a lot of B&B's in CA with age limits, maybe it depends on how many rooms and the zoning.
.
Willowpondgj said:
I've seen a lot of B&B's in CA with age limits, maybe it depends on how many rooms and the zoning.
Nope, it doesn't matter. A lot of times innkeepers are fully aware of the law or choose to ignore it. It does open them up for lawsuites. I know of a couple B&B who were slapped with suites and settled out of court.
There are people who go looking for trouble....there is also a notorious person who is disabled who purposefully goes out looking for places such as B&Bs that don't meet the ADA requirement. Fortunately, a lot of B&Bs are exempt to the ADA requirement.
 

sgirouard

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Turn it around so it is positive, not negative. 'We welcome children over the age of 8 (10, 12, whatever).'
Keep in mind that once you post that, guests who DO read the website who do NOT want to meet up with the same kids you don't want to host will be upset to find the ones you made an exception for.
Also, you can put a maximum occupancy limit on your rooms which will limit, somewhat, the number of kids who may show up..
Bree said:
Also, you can put a maximum occupancy limit on your rooms which will limit, somewhat, the number of kids who may show up.
Not an innkeeper yet, but we are on the road a lot (well, it seems to me), in hotels once or twice a month, and we have three kids - 6, 4 and 2. I *strongly* second Bree's suggestion about room capacity, with one addition.
Many, many, many places (hotels, amusement parks, even restaurants, if you can believe it) don't count children under a certain age. If we go to Disney, our 2yo doesn't need a ticket for a park, and can eat as much as he wants from the buffet because he's just "sharing" my plate. I went to a chain restaurant last year to discover that particular chain doesn't charge for anyone younger than four - so four of us ate for the price of two (and my kids eat like truckers). We just went to the drive-in (in Ennis, Proud Texan), and there was no charge for our 2yo OR our 4yo - so they got into a double feature for free.
We have been in hotels four times in the last two months. Again, apparently, our 2yo "doesn't count." We get a room that is clearly for four people, but because he's an "infant," he doesn't count.
Anyway - that's part of what you may be fighting - in so many places, children younger than 2 or 3 "don't count." So, if I were in your situation, I would clearly state in all literature (web site, flyers, correspondence) the room capacity and somehow bring it up in a confirmation email/phone call. Perhaps it would help to differentiate between "children" and "infants," as many places we've been do. For example - "The Magnolia Room sleeps two, including children and/or infants." "The Orange Blossom Room sleeps two. An adjoining room can also be rented, forming a suite which sleeps 4, or 5 including an infant who can sleep in a portable crib. These occupancy numbers include all occupants, including any children or infants." My statements are awkward, but I hope you can see what I'm getting at.
I also think it's very reasonable to make a statement that one's inn lacks appropriate facilities/resources for children and infants.
People who aren't trying to make trouble will appreciate the clarity in communication. People who are just difficult...well, those people are always going to be out there. Keeping your ducks in a row helps you be prepared for them, but will never eliminate them,
In some ways, it's an uphill battle. Consider airlines. Our oldest was ten months old when I realized the whole "lap child" thing is not what it's cracked up to be. I think it's very good to provide an out for families who may be flying under duress (sickness or death in family) and haven't prepared to spend for the extra seat. But...the lovely gentleman sitting next to me did not pay full price so he could have my son spill over onto his lap (God bless that man, he never complained or even gave me a dirty look). And they can ride in a parent's lap until they're two
. Since that flight, unless in desperate straits (or with a teeny, tiny newborn), our kids get their own seats. You would think that the airlines would appreciate this, but, um, not in my experience. I really think they'd prefer we did what everyone else does - take the "free" option for the lap child. Ugh. So, that's an example of what a traveling parent runs into, in terms of policy and practice.
JMO. Remember, not an innkeeper. Yet. But if you want to know what it's like to be in hotels,restaurants a lot (and on airplanes a fair amount) with little kids and babies, I'm your gal.
 

Breakfast Diva

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Turn it around so it is positive, not negative. 'We welcome children over the age of 8 (10, 12, whatever).'
Keep in mind that once you post that, guests who DO read the website who do NOT want to meet up with the same kids you don't want to host will be upset to find the ones you made an exception for.
Also, you can put a maximum occupancy limit on your rooms which will limit, somewhat, the number of kids who may show up..
Bree said:
Also, you can put a maximum occupancy limit on your rooms which will limit, somewhat, the number of kids who may show up.
Not an innkeeper yet, but we are on the road a lot (well, it seems to me), in hotels once or twice a month, and we have three kids - 6, 4 and 2. I *strongly* second Bree's suggestion about room capacity, with one addition.
Many, many, many places (hotels, amusement parks, even restaurants, if you can believe it) don't count children under a certain age. If we go to Disney, our 2yo doesn't need a ticket for a park, and can eat as much as he wants from the buffet because he's just "sharing" my plate. I went to a chain restaurant last year to discover that particular chain doesn't charge for anyone younger than four - so four of us ate for the price of two (and my kids eat like truckers). We just went to the drive-in (in Ennis, Proud Texan), and there was no charge for our 2yo OR our 4yo - so they got into a double feature for free.
We have been in hotels four times in the last two months. Again, apparently, our 2yo "doesn't count." We get a room that is clearly for four people, but because he's an "infant," he doesn't count.
Anyway - that's part of what you may be fighting - in so many places, children younger than 2 or 3 "don't count." So, if I were in your situation, I would clearly state in all literature (web site, flyers, correspondence) the room capacity and somehow bring it up in a confirmation email/phone call. Perhaps it would help to differentiate between "children" and "infants," as many places we've been do. For example - "The Magnolia Room sleeps two, including children and/or infants." "The Orange Blossom Room sleeps two. An adjoining room can also be rented, forming a suite which sleeps 4, or 5 including an infant who can sleep in a portable crib. These occupancy numbers include all occupants, including any children or infants." My statements are awkward, but I hope you can see what I'm getting at.
I also think it's very reasonable to make a statement that one's inn lacks appropriate facilities/resources for children and infants.
People who aren't trying to make trouble will appreciate the clarity in communication. People who are just difficult...well, those people are always going to be out there. Keeping your ducks in a row helps you be prepared for them, but will never eliminate them,
In some ways, it's an uphill battle. Consider airlines. Our oldest was ten months old when I realized the whole "lap child" thing is not what it's cracked up to be. I think it's very good to provide an out for families who may be flying under duress (sickness or death in family) and haven't prepared to spend for the extra seat. But...the lovely gentleman sitting next to me did not pay full price so he could have my son spill over onto his lap (God bless that man, he never complained or even gave me a dirty look). And they can ride in a parent's lap until they're two
. Since that flight, unless in desperate straits (or with a teeny, tiny newborn), our kids get their own seats. You would think that the airlines would appreciate this, but, um, not in my experience. I really think they'd prefer we did what everyone else does - take the "free" option for the lap child. Ugh. So, that's an example of what a traveling parent runs into, in terms of policy and practice.
JMO. Remember, not an innkeeper. Yet. But if you want to know what it's like to be in hotels,restaurants a lot (and on airplanes a fair amount) with little kids and babies, I'm your gal.
.
Thank you sgirouard, I think you gave some very valuable insight.
 

Sanctuary

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We say, "Regrettably, Sanctuary is not equipped for children under age 14." And we're not. I purposely will not add children size safety equipment to our supply for that very reason. Therefore, USCG regulations forbid me to take children without these items. Works for me.
Besides, the last thing I want to be doing is digging marbles or toy cars out of the toilet pump, or dumping $50,000 in an engine because some child thought it would be funny to pull the shutdown levers which are at about knee-height on me, or the bright red Halon lever (which would kill anyone who might be in the engine room at the time).
 

Morticia

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Turn it around so it is positive, not negative. 'We welcome children over the age of 8 (10, 12, whatever).'
Keep in mind that once you post that, guests who DO read the website who do NOT want to meet up with the same kids you don't want to host will be upset to find the ones you made an exception for.
Also, you can put a maximum occupancy limit on your rooms which will limit, somewhat, the number of kids who may show up..
Bree said:
Also, you can put a maximum occupancy limit on your rooms which will limit, somewhat, the number of kids who may show up.
Not an innkeeper yet, but we are on the road a lot (well, it seems to me), in hotels once or twice a month, and we have three kids - 6, 4 and 2. I *strongly* second Bree's suggestion about room capacity, with one addition.
Many, many, many places (hotels, amusement parks, even restaurants, if you can believe it) don't count children under a certain age. If we go to Disney, our 2yo doesn't need a ticket for a park, and can eat as much as he wants from the buffet because he's just "sharing" my plate. I went to a chain restaurant last year to discover that particular chain doesn't charge for anyone younger than four - so four of us ate for the price of two (and my kids eat like truckers). We just went to the drive-in (in Ennis, Proud Texan), and there was no charge for our 2yo OR our 4yo - so they got into a double feature for free.
We have been in hotels four times in the last two months. Again, apparently, our 2yo "doesn't count." We get a room that is clearly for four people, but because he's an "infant," he doesn't count.
Anyway - that's part of what you may be fighting - in so many places, children younger than 2 or 3 "don't count." So, if I were in your situation, I would clearly state in all literature (web site, flyers, correspondence) the room capacity and somehow bring it up in a confirmation email/phone call. Perhaps it would help to differentiate between "children" and "infants," as many places we've been do. For example - "The Magnolia Room sleeps two, including children and/or infants." "The Orange Blossom Room sleeps two. An adjoining room can also be rented, forming a suite which sleeps 4, or 5 including an infant who can sleep in a portable crib. These occupancy numbers include all occupants, including any children or infants." My statements are awkward, but I hope you can see what I'm getting at.
I also think it's very reasonable to make a statement that one's inn lacks appropriate facilities/resources for children and infants.
People who aren't trying to make trouble will appreciate the clarity in communication. People who are just difficult...well, those people are always going to be out there. Keeping your ducks in a row helps you be prepared for them, but will never eliminate them,
In some ways, it's an uphill battle. Consider airlines. Our oldest was ten months old when I realized the whole "lap child" thing is not what it's cracked up to be. I think it's very good to provide an out for families who may be flying under duress (sickness or death in family) and haven't prepared to spend for the extra seat. But...the lovely gentleman sitting next to me did not pay full price so he could have my son spill over onto his lap (God bless that man, he never complained or even gave me a dirty look). And they can ride in a parent's lap until they're two
. Since that flight, unless in desperate straits (or with a teeny, tiny newborn), our kids get their own seats. You would think that the airlines would appreciate this, but, um, not in my experience. I really think they'd prefer we did what everyone else does - take the "free" option for the lap child. Ugh. So, that's an example of what a traveling parent runs into, in terms of policy and practice.
JMO. Remember, not an innkeeper. Yet. But if you want to know what it's like to be in hotels,restaurants a lot (and on airplanes a fair amount) with little kids and babies, I'm your gal.
.
Very good point about the expectations of what is considered a 'guest who counts toward the occ max'! I should have known that given how many guests balk at paying for the kids (of any age) or think the kids don't count when we ask how many in the party. In which case, they really should go someplace where the kids are free. And I should take to asking, 'How many adults? How many babies or children of any age?'
I'm going to think about this and come up with some phrasing.
Our rooms simply do not have the space for setting up a crib. The adult guests would be hard pressed to find a spot where they could still get around if there was a crib. My daughter did it once and she spent the weekend climbing in and out of the playpen to get out of the room. Not suggested for guests without a sense of humor.
 

Morticia

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Turn it around so it is positive, not negative. 'We welcome children over the age of 8 (10, 12, whatever).'
Keep in mind that once you post that, guests who DO read the website who do NOT want to meet up with the same kids you don't want to host will be upset to find the ones you made an exception for.
Also, you can put a maximum occupancy limit on your rooms which will limit, somewhat, the number of kids who may show up..
Bree said:
Also, you can put a maximum occupancy limit on your rooms which will limit, somewhat, the number of kids who may show up.
Not an innkeeper yet, but we are on the road a lot (well, it seems to me), in hotels once or twice a month, and we have three kids - 6, 4 and 2. I *strongly* second Bree's suggestion about room capacity, with one addition.
Many, many, many places (hotels, amusement parks, even restaurants, if you can believe it) don't count children under a certain age. If we go to Disney, our 2yo doesn't need a ticket for a park, and can eat as much as he wants from the buffet because he's just "sharing" my plate. I went to a chain restaurant last year to discover that particular chain doesn't charge for anyone younger than four - so four of us ate for the price of two (and my kids eat like truckers). We just went to the drive-in (in Ennis, Proud Texan), and there was no charge for our 2yo OR our 4yo - so they got into a double feature for free.
We have been in hotels four times in the last two months. Again, apparently, our 2yo "doesn't count." We get a room that is clearly for four people, but because he's an "infant," he doesn't count.
Anyway - that's part of what you may be fighting - in so many places, children younger than 2 or 3 "don't count." So, if I were in your situation, I would clearly state in all literature (web site, flyers, correspondence) the room capacity and somehow bring it up in a confirmation email/phone call. Perhaps it would help to differentiate between "children" and "infants," as many places we've been do. For example - "The Magnolia Room sleeps two, including children and/or infants." "The Orange Blossom Room sleeps two. An adjoining room can also be rented, forming a suite which sleeps 4, or 5 including an infant who can sleep in a portable crib. These occupancy numbers include all occupants, including any children or infants." My statements are awkward, but I hope you can see what I'm getting at.
I also think it's very reasonable to make a statement that one's inn lacks appropriate facilities/resources for children and infants.
People who aren't trying to make trouble will appreciate the clarity in communication. People who are just difficult...well, those people are always going to be out there. Keeping your ducks in a row helps you be prepared for them, but will never eliminate them,
In some ways, it's an uphill battle. Consider airlines. Our oldest was ten months old when I realized the whole "lap child" thing is not what it's cracked up to be. I think it's very good to provide an out for families who may be flying under duress (sickness or death in family) and haven't prepared to spend for the extra seat. But...the lovely gentleman sitting next to me did not pay full price so he could have my son spill over onto his lap (God bless that man, he never complained or even gave me a dirty look). And they can ride in a parent's lap until they're two
. Since that flight, unless in desperate straits (or with a teeny, tiny newborn), our kids get their own seats. You would think that the airlines would appreciate this, but, um, not in my experience. I really think they'd prefer we did what everyone else does - take the "free" option for the lap child. Ugh. So, that's an example of what a traveling parent runs into, in terms of policy and practice.
JMO. Remember, not an innkeeper. Yet. But if you want to know what it's like to be in hotels,restaurants a lot (and on airplanes a fair amount) with little kids and babies, I'm your gal.
.
BTW, my kids also ate like truckers and we definitely got our money's worth when they were allowed to eat free or at reduced rates.
 

gillumhouse

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Turn it around so it is positive, not negative. 'We welcome children over the age of 8 (10, 12, whatever).'
Keep in mind that once you post that, guests who DO read the website who do NOT want to meet up with the same kids you don't want to host will be upset to find the ones you made an exception for.
Also, you can put a maximum occupancy limit on your rooms which will limit, somewhat, the number of kids who may show up..
Bree said:
Also, you can put a maximum occupancy limit on your rooms which will limit, somewhat, the number of kids who may show up.
Not an innkeeper yet, but we are on the road a lot (well, it seems to me), in hotels once or twice a month, and we have three kids - 6, 4 and 2. I *strongly* second Bree's suggestion about room capacity, with one addition.
Many, many, many places (hotels, amusement parks, even restaurants, if you can believe it) don't count children under a certain age. If we go to Disney, our 2yo doesn't need a ticket for a park, and can eat as much as he wants from the buffet because he's just "sharing" my plate. I went to a chain restaurant last year to discover that particular chain doesn't charge for anyone younger than four - so four of us ate for the price of two (and my kids eat like truckers). We just went to the drive-in (in Ennis, Proud Texan), and there was no charge for our 2yo OR our 4yo - so they got into a double feature for free.
We have been in hotels four times in the last two months. Again, apparently, our 2yo "doesn't count." We get a room that is clearly for four people, but because he's an "infant," he doesn't count.
Anyway - that's part of what you may be fighting - in so many places, children younger than 2 or 3 "don't count." So, if I were in your situation, I would clearly state in all literature (web site, flyers, correspondence) the room capacity and somehow bring it up in a confirmation email/phone call. Perhaps it would help to differentiate between "children" and "infants," as many places we've been do. For example - "The Magnolia Room sleeps two, including children and/or infants." "The Orange Blossom Room sleeps two. An adjoining room can also be rented, forming a suite which sleeps 4, or 5 including an infant who can sleep in a portable crib. These occupancy numbers include all occupants, including any children or infants." My statements are awkward, but I hope you can see what I'm getting at.
I also think it's very reasonable to make a statement that one's inn lacks appropriate facilities/resources for children and infants.
People who aren't trying to make trouble will appreciate the clarity in communication. People who are just difficult...well, those people are always going to be out there. Keeping your ducks in a row helps you be prepared for them, but will never eliminate them,
In some ways, it's an uphill battle. Consider airlines. Our oldest was ten months old when I realized the whole "lap child" thing is not what it's cracked up to be. I think it's very good to provide an out for families who may be flying under duress (sickness or death in family) and haven't prepared to spend for the extra seat. But...the lovely gentleman sitting next to me did not pay full price so he could have my son spill over onto his lap (God bless that man, he never complained or even gave me a dirty look). And they can ride in a parent's lap until they're two
. Since that flight, unless in desperate straits (or with a teeny, tiny newborn), our kids get their own seats. You would think that the airlines would appreciate this, but, um, not in my experience. I really think they'd prefer we did what everyone else does - take the "free" option for the lap child. Ugh. So, that's an example of what a traveling parent runs into, in terms of policy and practice.
JMO. Remember, not an innkeeper. Yet. But if you want to know what it's like to be in hotels,restaurants a lot (and on airplanes a fair amount) with little kids and babies, I'm your gal.
.
Ah yes... memories. In 1975 many if the restaurants we stopped at had children under 6 eat free. Buzzard and the twins were all under 6. I felt sorry for the restaurant owners. In 1979, Buzzard was still under 6 but was an eating machine - slow but sure. He really could pack it away.
And many of the chaain hotels advertise - The Kids Stay FREE and the Kids Eat FREE.
 

The Farmers Daughter

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The way I have that worded is:
The Main Inn welcomes children over the age of 12.
For familes traveling with children under the age of 12 or pets are welcome in our spacious, family style cottage.
In my state, children are not a 'protected class'. Accepting them are solely at our descretion. Frankly many Inns around here do not take children at all. Too many couples come to B & B's to escape their kids. They don't want to be dealing with someone elses.
 
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