• Hello, if you cannot log in, please use the Contact Us in the lower right hand corner of the page for assistance.

Counterfeit Honey

INNspiring.com | Innkeeper Forum & Innkeeping Resources

Help Support INNspiring.com | Innkeeper Forum & Innkeeping Resources:

JBloggs

Moderator
Moderator
Joined
Oct 7, 2008
Messages
17,743
Reaction score
0
Sorry if we already posted this somewhere, I can't recall. I know we discussed it on another thread.
http://www.naturalnews.com/040520_honey_supermarkets_counterfeit_food.html
By using in-house private testing, some US manufacturers have found out that their Asian imported honey is watered down with high fructose corn syrup and a myriad of illegal sweeteners and antibiotics.
Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/040520_honey_supermarkets_counterfeit_food.html#ixzz2VG8nkqwW
 

Madeleine

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 29, 2011
Messages
7,990
Reaction score
0
I think a survey last year showed supermarket 'honey' to be nothing but cane sugar.
 

JBloggs

Moderator
Moderator
Joined
Oct 7, 2008
Messages
17,743
Reaction score
0
I think a survey last year showed supermarket 'honey' to be nothing but cane sugar..
Madeleine said:
I think a survey last year showed supermarket 'honey' to be nothing but cane sugar.
That would be much better than what they are sharing it is from China, now. And perhaps this is why we always discuss honey not going off, and then many say their honey has gone off!
 

Madeleine

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 29, 2011
Messages
7,990
Reaction score
0
I think a survey last year showed supermarket 'honey' to be nothing but cane sugar..
Madeleine said:
I think a survey last year showed supermarket 'honey' to be nothing but cane sugar.
That would be much better than what they are sharing it is from China, now. And perhaps this is why we always discuss honey not going off, and then many say their honey has gone off!
.
The honey I get at the farmers market is still liquid. The stuff from the grocery store just crystallizes.
 

Madeleine

Well-known member
Joined
Sep 29, 2011
Messages
7,990
Reaction score
0
I think a survey last year showed supermarket 'honey' to be nothing but cane sugar..
Madeleine said:
I think a survey last year showed supermarket 'honey' to be nothing but cane sugar.
That would be much better than what they are sharing it is from China, now. And perhaps this is why we always discuss honey not going off, and then many say their honey has gone off!
.
Right, and now they own 20% of the pork production in this country.
 

gillumhouse

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Supporting Member
Joined
May 22, 2008
Messages
15,478
Reaction score
17
I think a survey last year showed supermarket 'honey' to be nothing but cane sugar..
Madeleine said:
I think a survey last year showed supermarket 'honey' to be nothing but cane sugar.
That would be much better than what they are sharing it is from China, now. And perhaps this is why we always discuss honey not going off, and then many say their honey has gone off!
.
That is why I get my honey locally - from an apiary.
 

Copperhead

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 24, 2008
Messages
5,969
Reaction score
0
And one reason we started our own hives, now 2 and growing.

Much of the reason the honey distribution is now coming from overseas is due to the chemicals used to keep garden pests at bay. And now one such company has developed seeds which contain these chemicals which grow in the plant. Honey bees are the number one pollinator, but the chemicals used are killing hives in record numbers and if things do not turn around we could see extinction in our lifetime Now before I get political I will beg off!
 

Generic

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 24, 2011
Messages
7,478
Reaction score
6
If they can't tell you what plant the bees were pollunating it's much more likely to be fake. I can buy wild flower, buckwheat, blueberry, clover and a few others. The blueberry really does smell of blueberries and the buckwheat is much darker. The clover is the most likely to be fake as it's the cheapest way to do it with no real distinct smells or tastes.
PS: Once honey crystalizes, you have to heat (in a bowl of hot water) it to get rid of the crystalization, but do it too often and it loses it's flavour and scent.
 

seashanty

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jun 2, 2008
Messages
5,680
Reaction score
4
this is payback for importing cheap goods from china, forcing our own farmers out of business. terrible!
 

Arks

Well-known member
Joined
May 22, 2010
Messages
6,037
Reaction score
32
Everybody here demands local honey. There's some research that shows health/allergy benefits to eating area honey. Local honey is the best selling item at my sister's "variety store". She drives to a nearby town regularly to buy it from a bee farmer there.
 

Innkeep

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 4, 2008
Messages
1,269
Reaction score
0
Everybody here demands local honey. There's some research that shows health/allergy benefits to eating area honey. Local honey is the best selling item at my sister's "variety store". She drives to a nearby town regularly to buy it from a bee farmer there..
Honey seems to be the only project that my cousin Becky has failed at. She offered to keep two hives for a local beekeeper last year, but the hives did not flourish. May have had something to do with the drought. My cousin has innkeeper ADD without being an innkeeper.
Her other projects have been very successful. She started a flock of chickens when her granddaughter wanted to watch chicks hatch from eggs, and now I am supplied with all the farm eggs I can use. She actually raises Monarch butterflies, a project that started when a caterpillar came indoors on a bouquet and a chrysalis appeared a few weeks later on her ceiling. She now supplies butterflies for weddings, funerals and a state historical site. I showed her an article about quilt barns, so now she has two quilt squares on her barn and is waiting for the artist to paint another square for the only other side of the barn that can be seen from the road.
Last fall she incubated quail eggs and released the quail which are now flourishing in her prairie grassland.
She helps me decorate the outside of the B&B each season, and grows special broom corn so I can have special fall decorations. Her garden is bountiful, so I have lots of fresh produce during harvest season.
Since her beekeeping experiment failed, I am really impressed with anyone who has success with beehives.
When guests ask me if I manage my B&B by myself, I say yes and no to give cousin Becky the credit she deserves.
 

Breakfast Diva

Well-known member
Joined
May 26, 2009
Messages
5,880
Reaction score
0
Everybody here demands local honey. There's some research that shows health/allergy benefits to eating area honey. Local honey is the best selling item at my sister's "variety store". She drives to a nearby town regularly to buy it from a bee farmer there..
Honey seems to be the only project that my cousin Becky has failed at. She offered to keep two hives for a local beekeeper last year, but the hives did not flourish. May have had something to do with the drought. My cousin has innkeeper ADD without being an innkeeper.
Her other projects have been very successful. She started a flock of chickens when her granddaughter wanted to watch chicks hatch from eggs, and now I am supplied with all the farm eggs I can use. She actually raises Monarch butterflies, a project that started when a caterpillar came indoors on a bouquet and a chrysalis appeared a few weeks later on her ceiling. She now supplies butterflies for weddings, funerals and a state historical site. I showed her an article about quilt barns, so now she has two quilt squares on her barn and is waiting for the artist to paint another square for the only other side of the barn that can be seen from the road.
Last fall she incubated quail eggs and released the quail which are now flourishing in her prairie grassland.
She helps me decorate the outside of the B&B each season, and grows special broom corn so I can have special fall decorations. Her garden is bountiful, so I have lots of fresh produce during harvest season.
Since her beekeeping experiment failed, I am really impressed with anyone who has success with beehives.
When guests ask me if I manage my B&B by myself, I say yes and no to give cousin Becky the credit she deserves.
.
Wow! Is her name Marth a Stew art??
 

Copperhead

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 24, 2008
Messages
5,969
Reaction score
0
Everybody here demands local honey. There's some research that shows health/allergy benefits to eating area honey. Local honey is the best selling item at my sister's "variety store". She drives to a nearby town regularly to buy it from a bee farmer there..
Honey seems to be the only project that my cousin Becky has failed at. She offered to keep two hives for a local beekeeper last year, but the hives did not flourish. May have had something to do with the drought. My cousin has innkeeper ADD without being an innkeeper.
Her other projects have been very successful. She started a flock of chickens when her granddaughter wanted to watch chicks hatch from eggs, and now I am supplied with all the farm eggs I can use. She actually raises Monarch butterflies, a project that started when a caterpillar came indoors on a bouquet and a chrysalis appeared a few weeks later on her ceiling. She now supplies butterflies for weddings, funerals and a state historical site. I showed her an article about quilt barns, so now she has two quilt squares on her barn and is waiting for the artist to paint another square for the only other side of the barn that can be seen from the road.
Last fall she incubated quail eggs and released the quail which are now flourishing in her prairie grassland.
She helps me decorate the outside of the B&B each season, and grows special broom corn so I can have special fall decorations. Her garden is bountiful, so I have lots of fresh produce during harvest season.
Since her beekeeping experiment failed, I am really impressed with anyone who has success with beehives.
When guests ask me if I manage my B&B by myself, I say yes and no to give cousin Becky the credit she deserves.
.
Wow, amazing woman! The beekeeping failure has nothing to do with her, bee hives fail for a number of reasons. If she has interest I suggest she try it again. We supplement their hives with a mixture similar to humming bird nectar (diff ratio) in the winter and did so also last summer due to dry conditions. Hope Becky gives it another try we need more beekeepers!!!
 

Kay Nein

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 13, 2012
Messages
830
Reaction score
0
If they can't tell you what plant the bees were pollunating it's much more likely to be fake. I can buy wild flower, buckwheat, blueberry, clover and a few others. The blueberry really does smell of blueberries and the buckwheat is much darker. The clover is the most likely to be fake as it's the cheapest way to do it with no real distinct smells or tastes.
PS: Once honey crystalizes, you have to heat (in a bowl of hot water) it to get rid of the crystalization, but do it too often and it loses it's flavour and scent..
In South FL, we went to a wildlife museum/preserve. They had a hive. Told a story of how someone had left a mountain dew outside, the bees got into it and the honey tasted like it. Neat!
 
Top