Do You Have a Vegetable Garden?

Bed & Breakfast / Short Term Rental Host Forum

Help Support Bed & Breakfast / Short Term Rental Host Forum:

white pine

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 2, 2010
Messages
939
Reaction score
0
If you have a veggie garden, do you use the fresh produce for the guests? I am thinking of keeping part of the overly large garden, I was going to have the whole thing mowed,, ( It is the old ball field, ) but we really enjoyed picking from those thornless raspberry plants.....now I am thinking some herbs and salad fare too?
 

egoodell

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 1, 2008
Messages
3,023
Reaction score
0
We do herbs right now. I use a lot of rosemary in potatoes, and we use mint a lot for garnish. Sure saves money at the grocery store. Once we get the outside finished with the wing I plan to plant more breakfast stuff.
Riki
 

Morticia

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Joined
May 22, 2008
Messages
17,672
Reaction score
566
Herbs, definitely. Tomatoes, peppers, the sorts of things you would use for breakfast. More fruits if you can grown them. Parsely makes a great garnish, as does mint (plant it in pots or it takes over).
 

white pine

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 2, 2010
Messages
939
Reaction score
0
Herbs, definitely. Tomatoes, peppers, the sorts of things you would use for breakfast. More fruits if you can grown them. Parsely makes a great garnish, as does mint (plant it in pots or it takes over)..
I have a boat load of mint. Literally, PO planted one of the boats full of mint....not sure how to undo that, but it can't stay where it is....will be a major job. Our season is late here fruits a challenge---lot's of wild blueberries, maybe I can work some strawberries in somewhere--I like that idea! Thanks!
 

white pine

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 2, 2010
Messages
939
Reaction score
0
We do herbs right now. I use a lot of rosemary in potatoes, and we use mint a lot for garnish. Sure saves money at the grocery store. Once we get the outside finished with the wing I plan to plant more breakfast stuff.
Riki.
Rosemary is nice, but I don't think rosemary is hardy here.... would a pot indoors yield enough? This is cold end of zone 5.
 

egoodell

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 1, 2008
Messages
3,023
Reaction score
0
We do herbs right now. I use a lot of rosemary in potatoes, and we use mint a lot for garnish. Sure saves money at the grocery store. Once we get the outside finished with the wing I plan to plant more breakfast stuff.
Riki.
Rosemary is nice, but I don't think rosemary is hardy here.... would a pot indoors yield enough? This is cold end of zone 5.
.
white pine said:
Rosemary is nice, but I don't think rosemary is hardy here.... would a pot indoors yield enough? This is cold end of zone 5.
I grow it indoors in the winter. Needs a window with sun. Mine suvives the winter here though - we got a bunch of snow last year and it came through fine. I have it in a wine barrel though. Maybe you could try it in something like that next to your building so that it does not freeze?
Riki
 

white pine

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 2, 2010
Messages
939
Reaction score
0
We do herbs right now. I use a lot of rosemary in potatoes, and we use mint a lot for garnish. Sure saves money at the grocery store. Once we get the outside finished with the wing I plan to plant more breakfast stuff.
Riki.
Rosemary is nice, but I don't think rosemary is hardy here.... would a pot indoors yield enough? This is cold end of zone 5.
.
white pine said:
Rosemary is nice, but I don't think rosemary is hardy here.... would a pot indoors yield enough? This is cold end of zone 5.
I grow it indoors in the winter. Needs a window with sun. Mine suvives the winter here though - we got a bunch of snow last year and it came through fine. I have it in a wine barrel though. Maybe you could try it in something like that next to your building so that it does not freeze?
Riki
.
Winter can push -20 here, but there is some lavender growing there, and that isn't supposed to grow here either. Maybe I can try some outside, and keep some in a pot to be safe too. Thanks, good idea.
 

Pollyanna

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 2, 2010
Messages
126
Reaction score
0
We have tomotoes, green peppers, green onions, basil, cilantro and a dwarf peach tree. The peaches are divine, better than candy. But not many of them. We use cilantro rather than parsley for granish and use the grape tomatoes for that as well. It's fun to just go out to the courtyard and get your granishes. We grow it all in containers in our gated and fenced courtyard due to rampant gophers, bunnie, javelina and occasional deer.
 

white pine

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 2, 2010
Messages
939
Reaction score
0
We have tomotoes, green peppers, green onions, basil, cilantro and a dwarf peach tree. The peaches are divine, better than candy. But not many of them. We use cilantro rather than parsley for granish and use the grape tomatoes for that as well. It's fun to just go out to the courtyard and get your granishes. We grow it all in containers in our gated and fenced courtyard due to rampant gophers, bunnie, javelina and occasional deer..
Lucky you! Peaches are wonderful ripe and fresh, definitely not peach country here. The small varieties of tomato have come a long way lately--very sweet. I suspect animals will be a problem, I will need a fence and deer-off. What's a javelina?
 

One Day

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 20, 2009
Messages
686
Reaction score
0
I don't have the traditional garden........I interplant in my planting beds and behind the greenhouse......I grow herbs as ornamentals.......salad greens I grow in 15 - 25 gallon nursery pots. This allows me to easily space out the planting so that I yeild all season long...Also in the pots, the greens are easier to collect, don't have to bend down to the ground.
Herbs I dry for winter use......2 years ago I dried so much......I bought spice jars and gave them to family for Christmas.
The herbs I grow......I haven't had to buy any in more than 10 years..........and knowing my gardens yeild just for ourselves.....definitley would grow and use with having a B&B......big money saver.
 

white pine

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 2, 2010
Messages
939
Reaction score
0
Thanks all-
Where we are it is hard and expensive to get good veggies. It about killed me to pay 59 cents a pound for zucchini! Quality was poor too. It brought the outraged gardener in me to the surface.
Will definitely look near the lodge for some container spots, the main garden will have to be further away to get max. sun.
Any ideas how to kill the mint short of herbicides? I will keep some containerized, but don't want it to get away and take over. I do have a 16' boat full.
 

birdwatcher

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 22, 2009
Messages
1,085
Reaction score
0
I did grow herbs and tomatoes when I had my own place and hope again to do that the day that I go back. I miss the gardening-but maybe next year I can talk the owner into one small lot for some tomatoes maybe peppers and definantely will grow more herbs. Would love to grow grapes, but husband said those are hard to grow.
The mint don't take out of the boat, just grow it, we had a field of wild mint in front of the long drive way in WV and when they mowed that part it smelled soo good. I always wondered how you make soap with it-mint is used in many things-if its contained why worry about it?
 

Pollyanna

Well-known member
Joined
Apr 2, 2010
Messages
126
Reaction score
0
We have tomotoes, green peppers, green onions, basil, cilantro and a dwarf peach tree. The peaches are divine, better than candy. But not many of them. We use cilantro rather than parsley for granish and use the grape tomatoes for that as well. It's fun to just go out to the courtyard and get your granishes. We grow it all in containers in our gated and fenced courtyard due to rampant gophers, bunnie, javelina and occasional deer..
Lucky you! Peaches are wonderful ripe and fresh, definitely not peach country here. The small varieties of tomato have come a long way lately--very sweet. I suspect animals will be a problem, I will need a fence and deer-off. What's a javelina?
.
Javelinas are common here in the southwest. Never heard of them till we moved here. They look like wild boar. The herds with their babies are kind of cute. But you have to steer clear. They can shred dogs and will attack if provoked. They are actually related to rats and mice more than pigs. But they are hairy and look more like pigs. They love to root for bulbs so some people here have electric fencing to protect their gardens and that does work. I prefer seeing the pronghorn deer around more than the javelinas!
 

white pine

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 2, 2010
Messages
939
Reaction score
0
We have tomotoes, green peppers, green onions, basil, cilantro and a dwarf peach tree. The peaches are divine, better than candy. But not many of them. We use cilantro rather than parsley for granish and use the grape tomatoes for that as well. It's fun to just go out to the courtyard and get your granishes. We grow it all in containers in our gated and fenced courtyard due to rampant gophers, bunnie, javelina and occasional deer..
Lucky you! Peaches are wonderful ripe and fresh, definitely not peach country here. The small varieties of tomato have come a long way lately--very sweet. I suspect animals will be a problem, I will need a fence and deer-off. What's a javelina?
.
Javelinas are common here in the southwest. Never heard of them till we moved here. They look like wild boar. The herds with their babies are kind of cute. But you have to steer clear. They can shred dogs and will attack if provoked. They are actually related to rats and mice more than pigs. But they are hairy and look more like pigs. They love to root for bulbs so some people here have electric fencing to protect their gardens and that does work. I prefer seeing the pronghorn deer around more than the javelinas!
.
Sound like nasty beasties. Glad we don't have them here. Our worst pest are deer (and drop-in visitors:

 

egoodell

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 1, 2008
Messages
3,023
Reaction score
0
We do herbs right now. I use a lot of rosemary in potatoes, and we use mint a lot for garnish. Sure saves money at the grocery store. Once we get the outside finished with the wing I plan to plant more breakfast stuff.
Riki.
Rosemary is nice, but I don't think rosemary is hardy here.... would a pot indoors yield enough? This is cold end of zone 5.
.
white pine said:
Rosemary is nice, but I don't think rosemary is hardy here.... would a pot indoors yield enough? This is cold end of zone 5.
I grow it indoors in the winter. Needs a window with sun. Mine suvives the winter here though - we got a bunch of snow last year and it came through fine. I have it in a wine barrel though. Maybe you could try it in something like that next to your building so that it does not freeze?
Riki
.
Winter can push -20 here, but there is some lavender growing there, and that isn't supposed to grow here either. Maybe I can try some outside, and keep some in a pot to be safe too. Thanks, good idea.
.
white pine said:
Winter can push -20 here, but there is some lavender growing there, and that isn't supposed to grow here either. Maybe I can try some outside, and keep some in a pot to be safe too. Thanks, good idea.
It's possible in a big container next to your building I think, and you can get the white cloth to cover if it gets cold. But we had big snow last winter and mine survived with no protection. It's located about 15 feet from the back of our inn. I am guessing it survived since it was not in the ground but in the wine barrel.
Riki
 

Alibi Ike

Well-known member
Staff member
Joined
Aug 8, 2010
Messages
2,928
Reaction score
0
We do herbs right now. I use a lot of rosemary in potatoes, and we use mint a lot for garnish. Sure saves money at the grocery store. Once we get the outside finished with the wing I plan to plant more breakfast stuff.
Riki.
Rosemary is nice, but I don't think rosemary is hardy here.... would a pot indoors yield enough? This is cold end of zone 5.
.
white pine said:
Rosemary is nice, but I don't think rosemary is hardy here.... would a pot indoors yield enough? This is cold end of zone 5.
I grow it indoors in the winter. Needs a window with sun. Mine suvives the winter here though - we got a bunch of snow last year and it came through fine. I have it in a wine barrel though. Maybe you could try it in something like that next to your building so that it does not freeze?
Riki
.
Winter can push -20 here, but there is some lavender growing there, and that isn't supposed to grow here either. Maybe I can try some outside, and keep some in a pot to be safe too. Thanks, good idea.
.
white pine said:
Winter can push -20 here, but there is some lavender growing there, and that isn't supposed to grow here either. Maybe I can try some outside, and keep some in a pot to be safe too. Thanks, good idea.
It's possible in a big container next to your building I think, and you can get the white cloth to cover if it gets cold. But we had big snow last winter and mine survived with no protection. It's located about 15 feet from the back of our inn. I am guessing it survived since it was not in the ground but in the wine barrel.
Riki
.
Lavender will grow in amazing climates. I used to have some where the temps could get to -35 or -40 overnight and for a week on end. If you want to have it, go to a local plant shop and ask them. Not Home Depot or Lowes.
 

One Day

Well-known member
Joined
Jul 20, 2009
Messages
686
Reaction score
0
You can spray roundup on the mint..........may have to do a repeat application.
Roundup has a 7 day residual......after that it is totaly broken down
 

white pine

Well-known member
Joined
Feb 2, 2010
Messages
939
Reaction score
0
You can spray roundup on the mint..........may have to do a repeat application.
Roundup has a 7 day residual......after that it is totaly broken down.
Thanks, I was thinking I may have to resort to Roudup. I have found that in spite of what it says, things tend to not do as well if there is any spray which gets on the soil. (The forest service botanist agrees with this by the way.) I guess it wouldn't matter too much, but I would have to find somewhere to dump the soil, and I was thinking maybe I could re-use it as fill for a raised bed.
 

gillumhouse

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Supporting Member
Joined
May 22, 2008
Messages
15,792
Reaction score
448
Unfortunately we have thought I do not have enough yard for a garden - although I may reconsider this soon. Problem is we do have a ground hog that may have taken up resedence under the porch again. Found another hole he dug (DH has not seen the hole - thank goodness, just the ground hog) at the side of the house DH does not usually see. Two seasons ago he ate ALL of my herbs and i had to start over. I have sage, oregano, parsley, tarragon, thyme, chices, and of course mint that thrive year after year and sometimes the rosemary will go as many as 4 years before giving up and needing replanted. The basil is an every year. I have this all planted around the perimeter of the house instead of flowers. I use a lot of herbs.
I get rave reviews on my salads and all I do is chop up fresh basil (very fine) and mix in. Next year will plant more chives. Will see if the lemon balm servives the winter.
 
Top