Quantcast

Emotional Support Animals

INNspiring.com | Innkeeper Forum & Innkeeping Resources

Help Support INNspiring.com | Innkeeper Forum & Innkeeping Resources:

JBloggs

Moderator
Moderator
Joined
Oct 7, 2008
Messages
17,743
Reaction score
0
We have mentioned in the past the not asking for proof on guide dogs. yet airlines are able to require proof? Your thoughts?
"Emotional support service animals are service animals that provide emotional support to an individual with a mental health related disability. On most airlines, documentation must be provided 48 hours before departure to permit emotional support animals to travel in the passenger cabin.
While doing a little research, I came across an interesting bit of information. "Did you know there are horses that are considered emotional support service animals?" I asked my mother who is also a flight attendant for the same airline I work for. "Not horses. Small ponies," she corrected. Before I could even comment, my mother who was now laughing said, "Hey, I have an idea. Why don't you call a couple airlines and tell them you'd like to bring a small horse on board in main cabin. See what they say." "
Entire article here
 

Innkeeper To Go

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 27, 2009
Messages
1,395
Reaction score
0
Basically, it seems that if it's a violation (and yes we can be sued for it) to even ask for proof, that same should hold true for the airlines, too.
Fair is fair, after all.
And while I understand that airline cabins are confined spaces and potential impact to all passengers is high, the potential impact to an inn is very strong, too. After all, we'll have guests SLEEPING in that room the next night.
So, to me, it doesn't seem fair that airlines should have the ability to demand proof if we don't.
That said, I'm a big supporter of the human-animal bond community and believe that folks who have service animals of any kind should be welcome wherever they go.
 

Morticia

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Joined
May 22, 2008
Messages
17,358
Reaction score
235
Do the airlines require documentation for service animals or just emotional support animals? Two entirely different categories.
We don't have to take emotional support animals. That category, as far as I know, is still being debated.
 

Innkeeper To Go

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 27, 2009
Messages
1,395
Reaction score
0
Do the airlines require documentation for service animals or just emotional support animals? Two entirely different categories.
We don't have to take emotional support animals. That category, as far as I know, is still being debated..
Actually, no, it's not up for debate. A service animal can be for any reason, including emotional. Someone who needs that animal to help control their PTSD, for instance, needs that animal as much as someone who is blind.
 

Morticia

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Joined
May 22, 2008
Messages
17,358
Reaction score
235
Do the airlines require documentation for service animals or just emotional support animals? Two entirely different categories.
We don't have to take emotional support animals. That category, as far as I know, is still being debated..
Actually, no, it's not up for debate. A service animal can be for any reason, including emotional. Someone who needs that animal to help control their PTSD, for instance, needs that animal as much as someone who is blind.
.
My empahsis below...
[h2] [/h2][h2]How will the definition of "service animal" change in 2009?[/h2] It will change from:
"Service animal means any guide dog, signal dog, or other animal individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including, but not limited to, guiding individuals with impaired vision, alerting individuals with impaired hearing to intruders or sounds, providing minimal protection or rescue work, pulling awheelchair, or fetching dropped items."
http://www.ada.gov/reg3a.html#Anchor-36104
To:
"Service animal means any dog or other common domestic animal individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including, but not limited to, guiding individuals who are blind or have low vision, alerting individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing to the presence of people or sounds, providing minimal protection or rescue work, pulling a wheelchair, fetching items, assisting an individual during a seizure, retrieving medicine or the telephone, providing physical support and assistance with balance and stability to individuals with mobility disabilities, and assisting individuals, including those with cognitive disabilities, with navigation. The term service animal includes individually trained animals that do work or perform tasks for the benefit of individuals with disabilities, including psychiatric, cognitive, and mental disabilities. The term service animal does not include wild animals (including nonhuman primates born in captivity), reptiles, rabbits, farm animals (including any breed of horse, miniature horse, pony, pig, or goat), ferrets, amphibians, and rodents. Animals whose sole function is to provide emotional support, comfort, therapy, companionship, therapeutic benefits, or to promote emotional well-being are not service animals."
http://www.ada.gov/NPRM2008/t3NPRM_federalreg.htm
 

muirford

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Joined
May 22, 2008
Messages
2,493
Reaction score
12
Do the airlines require documentation for service animals or just emotional support animals? Two entirely different categories.
We don't have to take emotional support animals. That category, as far as I know, is still being debated..
Actually, no, it's not up for debate. A service animal can be for any reason, including emotional. Someone who needs that animal to help control their PTSD, for instance, needs that animal as much as someone who is blind.
.
My empahsis below...
[h2] [/h2][h2]How will the definition of "service animal" change in 2009?[/h2] It will change from:
"Service animal means any guide dog, signal dog, or other animal individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including, but not limited to, guiding individuals with impaired vision, alerting individuals with impaired hearing to intruders or sounds, providing minimal protection or rescue work, pulling awheelchair, or fetching dropped items."
http://www.ada.gov/reg3a.html#Anchor-36104
To:
"Service animal means any dog or other common domestic animal individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including, but not limited to, guiding individuals who are blind or have low vision, alerting individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing to the presence of people or sounds, providing minimal protection or rescue work, pulling a wheelchair, fetching items, assisting an individual during a seizure, retrieving medicine or the telephone, providing physical support and assistance with balance and stability to individuals with mobility disabilities, and assisting individuals, including those with cognitive disabilities, with navigation. The term service animal includes individually trained animals that do work or perform tasks for the benefit of individuals with disabilities, including psychiatric, cognitive, and mental disabilities. The term service animal does not include wild animals (including nonhuman primates born in captivity), reptiles, rabbits, farm animals (including any breed of horse, miniature horse, pony, pig, or goat), ferrets, amphibians, and rodents. Animals whose sole function is to provide emotional support, comfort, therapy, companionship, therapeutic benefits, or to promote emotional well-being are not service animals."
http://www.ada.gov/NPRM2008/t3NPRM_federalreg.htm
.
That is my understanding also. The TSA has made its own decision to allow emotional support animals, which is their right - but if they do they probably have the right to insist on documentation. No other venue is, at this point, required to take them.
 

swirt

Forum founder. Former Owner.
Joined
May 17, 2008
Messages
3,210
Reaction score
0
First off, it's not exactly a researched article, just a stewardess blog post so the details are kind of sparse (read: I'm not going to get my knickers in a twist)
The article does not mention what the documentation is (especially since there are no official certifying agencies). The documentation might be nothing more than proof of vacinations and registration.
The other issues as Morticia mentions is the difference in classification between service animal and therapy/support animal. This blogger may be merging the two when they aren't really the same thing.
I guess the interesting thing I had not considered before, I imagine we could ask for proof of rabies vaccination, kennel cough (if you have your own dogs), and registration.
 

Innkeeper To Go

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 27, 2009
Messages
1,395
Reaction score
0
Do the airlines require documentation for service animals or just emotional support animals? Two entirely different categories.
We don't have to take emotional support animals. That category, as far as I know, is still being debated..
Actually, no, it's not up for debate. A service animal can be for any reason, including emotional. Someone who needs that animal to help control their PTSD, for instance, needs that animal as much as someone who is blind.
.
My empahsis below...
[h2] [/h2][h2]How will the definition of "service animal" change in 2009?[/h2] It will change from:
"Service animal means any guide dog, signal dog, or other animal individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including, but not limited to, guiding individuals with impaired vision, alerting individuals with impaired hearing to intruders or sounds, providing minimal protection or rescue work, pulling awheelchair, or fetching dropped items."
http://www.ada.gov/reg3a.html#Anchor-36104
To:
"Service animal means any dog or other common domestic animal individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including, but not limited to, guiding individuals who are blind or have low vision, alerting individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing to the presence of people or sounds, providing minimal protection or rescue work, pulling a wheelchair, fetching items, assisting an individual during a seizure, retrieving medicine or the telephone, providing physical support and assistance with balance and stability to individuals with mobility disabilities, and assisting individuals, including those with cognitive disabilities, with navigation. The term service animal includes individually trained animals that do work or perform tasks for the benefit of individuals with disabilities, including psychiatric, cognitive, and mental disabilities. The term service animal does not include wild animals (including nonhuman primates born in captivity), reptiles, rabbits, farm animals (including any breed of horse, miniature horse, pony, pig, or goat), ferrets, amphibians, and rodents. Animals whose sole function is to provide emotional support, comfort, therapy, companionship, therapeutic benefits, or to promote emotional well-being are not service animals."
http://www.ada.gov/NPRM2008/t3NPRM_federalreg.htm
.
Yes, but in practical terms, it's almost impossible to distinguish the difference between an animal that supports someone with psychiatric, cognitive and mental disabilities from an animal who provides cognitive support.
If the purpose is to provide therapeutic benefit, a doctor will support the patient's need for the service animal most of the time.
And if it's therapeutic, it's therapeutic.
And since we can't even ask to see the proof, it all becomes moot. They say it's a service animal, it's a service animal.
So while, yes, it's being suggested that the statute be changed to add emotional support, in the practical world there's really not much difference. This is just to close any potential gaps in wording.
IMHO.
 

JBloggs

Moderator
Moderator
Joined
Oct 7, 2008
Messages
17,743
Reaction score
0
Correct, I did not post this as a resource, it is just a topic for discussion. Personally the sock monkey is the one I would give the boot too! (pun intended)
 

Morticia

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Joined
May 22, 2008
Messages
17,358
Reaction score
235
Do the airlines require documentation for service animals or just emotional support animals? Two entirely different categories.
We don't have to take emotional support animals. That category, as far as I know, is still being debated..
Actually, no, it's not up for debate. A service animal can be for any reason, including emotional. Someone who needs that animal to help control their PTSD, for instance, needs that animal as much as someone who is blind.
.
My empahsis below...
[h2] [/h2][h2]How will the definition of "service animal" change in 2009?[/h2] It will change from:
"Service animal means any guide dog, signal dog, or other animal individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including, but not limited to, guiding individuals with impaired vision, alerting individuals with impaired hearing to intruders or sounds, providing minimal protection or rescue work, pulling awheelchair, or fetching dropped items."
http://www.ada.gov/reg3a.html#Anchor-36104
To:
"Service animal means any dog or other common domestic animal individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including, but not limited to, guiding individuals who are blind or have low vision, alerting individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing to the presence of people or sounds, providing minimal protection or rescue work, pulling a wheelchair, fetching items, assisting an individual during a seizure, retrieving medicine or the telephone, providing physical support and assistance with balance and stability to individuals with mobility disabilities, and assisting individuals, including those with cognitive disabilities, with navigation. The term service animal includes individually trained animals that do work or perform tasks for the benefit of individuals with disabilities, including psychiatric, cognitive, and mental disabilities. The term service animal does not include wild animals (including nonhuman primates born in captivity), reptiles, rabbits, farm animals (including any breed of horse, miniature horse, pony, pig, or goat), ferrets, amphibians, and rodents. Animals whose sole function is to provide emotional support, comfort, therapy, companionship, therapeutic benefits, or to promote emotional well-being are not service animals."
http://www.ada.gov/NPRM2008/t3NPRM_federalreg.htm
.
Yes, but in practical terms, it's almost impossible to distinguish the difference between an animal that supports someone with psychiatric, cognitive and mental disabilities from an animal who provides cognitive support.
If the purpose is to provide therapeutic benefit, a doctor will support the patient's need for the service animal most of the time.
And if it's therapeutic, it's therapeutic.
And since we can't even ask to see the proof, it all becomes moot. They say it's a service animal, it's a service animal.
So while, yes, it's being suggested that the statute be changed to add emotional support, in the practical world there's really not much difference. This is just to close any potential gaps in wording.
IMHO.
.
You can't ask for proof that the animal is certified (read: trained) but you CAN ask what service the animal provides. If that service is not one on the 'approved' list, I don't have to take the animal in a 'regular' room. If the 'pet friendly' room is available, they will need to take that one.
I've only had 3 calls for service animals and none of the dogs were 'certified,' as in coming from a professionally trained organization. One caller wanted a 'fenced' yard so her dog wouldn't run away. Because I don't have a fenced yard, I sent her elsewhere. But that was definitely NOT a trained service dog. Another caller told me he trained the dog himself.
 

swirt

Forum founder. Former Owner.
Joined
May 17, 2008
Messages
3,210
Reaction score
0
As near as I can tell, the definition of "service animal" was tightened up a little bit last year
http://www.servicedogcentral.org/content/node/297
Service animal means any dog or other common domestic animal individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including, but not limited to, guiding individuals who are blind or have low vision, alerting individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing to the presence of people or sounds, providing minimal protection or rescue work, pulling a wheelchair, fetching items, assisting an individual during a seizure, retrieving medicine or the telephone, providing physical support and assistance with balance and stability to individuals with mobility disabilities, and assisting individuals, including those with cognitive disabilities, with navigation. The term service animal includes individually trained animals that do work or perform tasks for the benefit of individuals with disabilities, including psychiatric, cognitive, and mental disabilities. The term service animal does not include wild animals (including nonhuman primates born in captivity), reptiles, rabbits, farm animals (including any breed of horse, miniature horse, pony, pig, or goat), ferrets, amphibians, and rodents. Animals whose sole function is to provide emotional support, comfort, therapy, companionship, therapeutic benefits, or to promote emotional well-being are not service animals.
http://www.ada.gov/NPRM2008/t3NPRM_federalreg.htm
 

muirford

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Joined
May 22, 2008
Messages
2,493
Reaction score
12
Do the airlines require documentation for service animals or just emotional support animals? Two entirely different categories.
We don't have to take emotional support animals. That category, as far as I know, is still being debated..
Actually, no, it's not up for debate. A service animal can be for any reason, including emotional. Someone who needs that animal to help control their PTSD, for instance, needs that animal as much as someone who is blind.
.
My empahsis below...
[h2] [/h2][h2]How will the definition of "service animal" change in 2009?[/h2] It will change from:
"Service animal means any guide dog, signal dog, or other animal individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including, but not limited to, guiding individuals with impaired vision, alerting individuals with impaired hearing to intruders or sounds, providing minimal protection or rescue work, pulling awheelchair, or fetching dropped items."
http://www.ada.gov/reg3a.html#Anchor-36104
To:
"Service animal means any dog or other common domestic animal individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including, but not limited to, guiding individuals who are blind or have low vision, alerting individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing to the presence of people or sounds, providing minimal protection or rescue work, pulling a wheelchair, fetching items, assisting an individual during a seizure, retrieving medicine or the telephone, providing physical support and assistance with balance and stability to individuals with mobility disabilities, and assisting individuals, including those with cognitive disabilities, with navigation. The term service animal includes individually trained animals that do work or perform tasks for the benefit of individuals with disabilities, including psychiatric, cognitive, and mental disabilities. The term service animal does not include wild animals (including nonhuman primates born in captivity), reptiles, rabbits, farm animals (including any breed of horse, miniature horse, pony, pig, or goat), ferrets, amphibians, and rodents. Animals whose sole function is to provide emotional support, comfort, therapy, companionship, therapeutic benefits, or to promote emotional well-being are not service animals."
http://www.ada.gov/NPRM2008/t3NPRM_federalreg.htm
.
Yes, but in practical terms, it's almost impossible to distinguish the difference between an animal that supports someone with psychiatric, cognitive and mental disabilities from an animal who provides cognitive support.
If the purpose is to provide therapeutic benefit, a doctor will support the patient's need for the service animal most of the time.
And if it's therapeutic, it's therapeutic.
And since we can't even ask to see the proof, it all becomes moot. They say it's a service animal, it's a service animal.
So while, yes, it's being suggested that the statute be changed to add emotional support, in the practical world there's really not much difference. This is just to close any potential gaps in wording.
IMHO.
.
You can't ask for proof that the animal is certified (read: trained) but you CAN ask what service the animal provides. If that service is not one on the 'approved' list, I don't have to take the animal in a 'regular' room. If the 'pet friendly' room is available, they will need to take that one.
I've only had 3 calls for service animals and none of the dogs were 'certified,' as in coming from a professionally trained organization. One caller wanted a 'fenced' yard so her dog wouldn't run away. Because I don't have a fenced yard, I sent her elsewhere. But that was definitely NOT a trained service dog. Another caller told me he trained the dog himself.
.
Also note that horses, miniature or otherwise, are excluded as service animals. You didn't mention it but the blogger did.
 

Morticia

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Joined
May 22, 2008
Messages
17,358
Reaction score
235
Do the airlines require documentation for service animals or just emotional support animals? Two entirely different categories.
We don't have to take emotional support animals. That category, as far as I know, is still being debated..
Actually, no, it's not up for debate. A service animal can be for any reason, including emotional. Someone who needs that animal to help control their PTSD, for instance, needs that animal as much as someone who is blind.
.
My empahsis below...
[h2] [/h2][h2]How will the definition of "service animal" change in 2009?[/h2] It will change from:
"Service animal means any guide dog, signal dog, or other animal individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including, but not limited to, guiding individuals with impaired vision, alerting individuals with impaired hearing to intruders or sounds, providing minimal protection or rescue work, pulling awheelchair, or fetching dropped items."
http://www.ada.gov/reg3a.html#Anchor-36104
To:
"Service animal means any dog or other common domestic animal individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including, but not limited to, guiding individuals who are blind or have low vision, alerting individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing to the presence of people or sounds, providing minimal protection or rescue work, pulling a wheelchair, fetching items, assisting an individual during a seizure, retrieving medicine or the telephone, providing physical support and assistance with balance and stability to individuals with mobility disabilities, and assisting individuals, including those with cognitive disabilities, with navigation. The term service animal includes individually trained animals that do work or perform tasks for the benefit of individuals with disabilities, including psychiatric, cognitive, and mental disabilities. The term service animal does not include wild animals (including nonhuman primates born in captivity), reptiles, rabbits, farm animals (including any breed of horse, miniature horse, pony, pig, or goat), ferrets, amphibians, and rodents. Animals whose sole function is to provide emotional support, comfort, therapy, companionship, therapeutic benefits, or to promote emotional well-being are not service animals."
http://www.ada.gov/NPRM2008/t3NPRM_federalreg.htm
.
Yes, but in practical terms, it's almost impossible to distinguish the difference between an animal that supports someone with psychiatric, cognitive and mental disabilities from an animal who provides cognitive support.
If the purpose is to provide therapeutic benefit, a doctor will support the patient's need for the service animal most of the time.
And if it's therapeutic, it's therapeutic.
And since we can't even ask to see the proof, it all becomes moot. They say it's a service animal, it's a service animal.
So while, yes, it's being suggested that the statute be changed to add emotional support, in the practical world there's really not much difference. This is just to close any potential gaps in wording.
IMHO.
.
You can't ask for proof that the animal is certified (read: trained) but you CAN ask what service the animal provides. If that service is not one on the 'approved' list, I don't have to take the animal in a 'regular' room. If the 'pet friendly' room is available, they will need to take that one.
I've only had 3 calls for service animals and none of the dogs were 'certified,' as in coming from a professionally trained organization. One caller wanted a 'fenced' yard so her dog wouldn't run away. Because I don't have a fenced yard, I sent her elsewhere. But that was definitely NOT a trained service dog. Another caller told me he trained the dog himself.
.
Also note that horses, miniature or otherwise, are excluded as service animals. You didn't mention it but the blogger did.
.
That other post I had stated about the horses. I've never had anyone ask about anything other than dogs.
 

Innkeeper To Go

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 27, 2009
Messages
1,395
Reaction score
0
Do the airlines require documentation for service animals or just emotional support animals? Two entirely different categories.
We don't have to take emotional support animals. That category, as far as I know, is still being debated..
Actually, no, it's not up for debate. A service animal can be for any reason, including emotional. Someone who needs that animal to help control their PTSD, for instance, needs that animal as much as someone who is blind.
.
My empahsis below...
[h2] [/h2][h2]How will the definition of "service animal" change in 2009?[/h2] It will change from:
"Service animal means any guide dog, signal dog, or other animal individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including, but not limited to, guiding individuals with impaired vision, alerting individuals with impaired hearing to intruders or sounds, providing minimal protection or rescue work, pulling awheelchair, or fetching dropped items."
http://www.ada.gov/reg3a.html#Anchor-36104
To:
"Service animal means any dog or other common domestic animal individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including, but not limited to, guiding individuals who are blind or have low vision, alerting individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing to the presence of people or sounds, providing minimal protection or rescue work, pulling a wheelchair, fetching items, assisting an individual during a seizure, retrieving medicine or the telephone, providing physical support and assistance with balance and stability to individuals with mobility disabilities, and assisting individuals, including those with cognitive disabilities, with navigation. The term service animal includes individually trained animals that do work or perform tasks for the benefit of individuals with disabilities, including psychiatric, cognitive, and mental disabilities. The term service animal does not include wild animals (including nonhuman primates born in captivity), reptiles, rabbits, farm animals (including any breed of horse, miniature horse, pony, pig, or goat), ferrets, amphibians, and rodents. Animals whose sole function is to provide emotional support, comfort, therapy, companionship, therapeutic benefits, or to promote emotional well-being are not service animals."
http://www.ada.gov/NPRM2008/t3NPRM_federalreg.htm
.
Yes, but in practical terms, it's almost impossible to distinguish the difference between an animal that supports someone with psychiatric, cognitive and mental disabilities from an animal who provides cognitive support.
If the purpose is to provide therapeutic benefit, a doctor will support the patient's need for the service animal most of the time.
And if it's therapeutic, it's therapeutic.
And since we can't even ask to see the proof, it all becomes moot. They say it's a service animal, it's a service animal.
So while, yes, it's being suggested that the statute be changed to add emotional support, in the practical world there's really not much difference. This is just to close any potential gaps in wording.
IMHO.
.
You can't ask for proof that the animal is certified (read: trained) but you CAN ask what service the animal provides. If that service is not one on the 'approved' list, I don't have to take the animal in a 'regular' room. If the 'pet friendly' room is available, they will need to take that one.
I've only had 3 calls for service animals and none of the dogs were 'certified,' as in coming from a professionally trained organization. One caller wanted a 'fenced' yard so her dog wouldn't run away. Because I don't have a fenced yard, I sent her elsewhere. But that was definitely NOT a trained service dog. Another caller told me he trained the dog himself.
.
Morticia said:
You can't ask for proof that the animal is certified (read: trained) but you CAN ask what service the animal provides. If that service is not one on the 'approved' list, I don't have to take the animal in a 'regular' room. If the 'pet friendly' room is available, they will need to take that one.
I've only had 3 calls for service animals and none of the dogs were 'certified,' as in coming from a professionally trained organization. One caller wanted a 'fenced' yard so her dog wouldn't run away. Because I don't have a fenced yard, I sent her elsewhere. But that was definitely NOT a trained service dog. Another caller told me he trained the dog himself.
And I guess my response to that would be that is why folks are wanting to tighten up the existing language; to stop that from happening. To close the gaps that allow you to make those distinctions because that was never the way it was supposed to work.
Updated to add link showing why you do NOT want to question whether the animal is certified or not. ADA does not make that distinction and neither can innkeepers.
 

Samster

Well-known member
Joined
May 30, 2008
Messages
6,475
Reaction score
14
Location
South Carolina
As near as I can tell, the definition of "service animal" was tightened up a little bit last year
http://www.servicedogcentral.org/content/node/297
Service animal means any dog or other common domestic animal individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including, but not limited to, guiding individuals who are blind or have low vision, alerting individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing to the presence of people or sounds, providing minimal protection or rescue work, pulling a wheelchair, fetching items, assisting an individual during a seizure, retrieving medicine or the telephone, providing physical support and assistance with balance and stability to individuals with mobility disabilities, and assisting individuals, including those with cognitive disabilities, with navigation. The term service animal includes individually trained animals that do work or perform tasks for the benefit of individuals with disabilities, including psychiatric, cognitive, and mental disabilities. The term service animal does not include wild animals (including nonhuman primates born in captivity), reptiles, rabbits, farm animals (including any breed of horse, miniature horse, pony, pig, or goat), ferrets, amphibians, and rodents. Animals whose sole function is to provide emotional support, comfort, therapy, companionship, therapeutic benefits, or to promote emotional well-being are not service animals.
http://www.ada.gov/NPRM2008/t3NPRM_federalreg.htm.
Thanks, Swirt, for providing that definition right from the "horse's mouth". haha!
What can I say? I'm a short timer...... :)
 

muirford

Administrator
Staff member
Administrator
Moderator
Joined
May 22, 2008
Messages
2,493
Reaction score
12
Do the airlines require documentation for service animals or just emotional support animals? Two entirely different categories.
We don't have to take emotional support animals. That category, as far as I know, is still being debated..
Actually, no, it's not up for debate. A service animal can be for any reason, including emotional. Someone who needs that animal to help control their PTSD, for instance, needs that animal as much as someone who is blind.
.
My empahsis below...
[h2] [/h2][h2]How will the definition of "service animal" change in 2009?[/h2] It will change from:
"Service animal means any guide dog, signal dog, or other animal individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including, but not limited to, guiding individuals with impaired vision, alerting individuals with impaired hearing to intruders or sounds, providing minimal protection or rescue work, pulling awheelchair, or fetching dropped items."
http://www.ada.gov/reg3a.html#Anchor-36104
To:
"Service animal means any dog or other common domestic animal individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including, but not limited to, guiding individuals who are blind or have low vision, alerting individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing to the presence of people or sounds, providing minimal protection or rescue work, pulling a wheelchair, fetching items, assisting an individual during a seizure, retrieving medicine or the telephone, providing physical support and assistance with balance and stability to individuals with mobility disabilities, and assisting individuals, including those with cognitive disabilities, with navigation. The term service animal includes individually trained animals that do work or perform tasks for the benefit of individuals with disabilities, including psychiatric, cognitive, and mental disabilities. The term service animal does not include wild animals (including nonhuman primates born in captivity), reptiles, rabbits, farm animals (including any breed of horse, miniature horse, pony, pig, or goat), ferrets, amphibians, and rodents. Animals whose sole function is to provide emotional support, comfort, therapy, companionship, therapeutic benefits, or to promote emotional well-being are not service animals."
http://www.ada.gov/NPRM2008/t3NPRM_federalreg.htm
.
Yes, but in practical terms, it's almost impossible to distinguish the difference between an animal that supports someone with psychiatric, cognitive and mental disabilities from an animal who provides cognitive support.
If the purpose is to provide therapeutic benefit, a doctor will support the patient's need for the service animal most of the time.
And if it's therapeutic, it's therapeutic.
And since we can't even ask to see the proof, it all becomes moot. They say it's a service animal, it's a service animal.
So while, yes, it's being suggested that the statute be changed to add emotional support, in the practical world there's really not much difference. This is just to close any potential gaps in wording.
IMHO.
.
You can't ask for proof that the animal is certified (read: trained) but you CAN ask what service the animal provides. If that service is not one on the 'approved' list, I don't have to take the animal in a 'regular' room. If the 'pet friendly' room is available, they will need to take that one.
I've only had 3 calls for service animals and none of the dogs were 'certified,' as in coming from a professionally trained organization. One caller wanted a 'fenced' yard so her dog wouldn't run away. Because I don't have a fenced yard, I sent her elsewhere. But that was definitely NOT a trained service dog. Another caller told me he trained the dog himself.
.
Morticia said:
You can't ask for proof that the animal is certified (read: trained) but you CAN ask what service the animal provides. If that service is not one on the 'approved' list, I don't have to take the animal in a 'regular' room. If the 'pet friendly' room is available, they will need to take that one.
I've only had 3 calls for service animals and none of the dogs were 'certified,' as in coming from a professionally trained organization. One caller wanted a 'fenced' yard so her dog wouldn't run away. Because I don't have a fenced yard, I sent her elsewhere. But that was definitely NOT a trained service dog. Another caller told me he trained the dog himself.
And I guess my response to that would be that is why folks are wanting to tighten up the existing language; to stop that from happening. To close the gaps that allow you to make those distinctions because that was never the way it was supposed to work.
Updated to add link showing why you do NOT want to question whether the animal is certified or not. ADA does not make that distinction and neither can innkeepers.
.
Innkeeper To Go said:
Updated to add link showing why you do NOT want to question whether the animal is certified or not. ADA does not make that distinction and neither can innkeepers.
Let's be clear, though - they don't require certification but they most assuredly make a distinction between service animals and emotional support animals. So can innkeepers.
I don't know if Mort asked about certification, but if she asked what service the animal provides, and the response is "my dog is my emotional support" for whatever, she can refuse to accommodate the dog. Just because the TSA allows them doesn't mean that everyone is required to allow them.
 

Copperhead

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 24, 2008
Messages
5,969
Reaction score
0
I have not, as of now, been asked to take a service pet or have anyone just appear with one (recall this happening in an older thread). In order to be prepared if this does come up, my question is, are we ALL required to take service pets? I am not required to ADA compliant so would I be required to accept a service pet?
Someone please provide a link to the law on this if you know of one. Thanks!
 

Innkeeper To Go

Well-known member
Joined
Oct 27, 2009
Messages
1,395
Reaction score
0
I have not, as of now, been asked to take a service pet or have anyone just appear with one (recall this happening in an older thread). In order to be prepared if this does come up, my question is, are we ALL required to take service pets? I am not required to ADA compliant so would I be required to accept a service pet?
Someone please provide a link to the law on this if you know of one. Thanks!.
CH, this is the Department of Justice link that I had put in a comment earlier. It includes some frequently asked questions as well as a number you can call to get more information from a real person.
 

egoodell

Well-known member
Joined
Jun 1, 2008
Messages
3,023
Reaction score
0
I have not, as of now, been asked to take a service pet or have anyone just appear with one (recall this happening in an older thread). In order to be prepared if this does come up, my question is, are we ALL required to take service pets? I am not required to ADA compliant so would I be required to accept a service pet?
Someone please provide a link to the law on this if you know of one. Thanks!.
Copperhead said:
I have not, as of now, been asked to take a service pet or have anyone just appear with one (recall this happening in an older thread). In order to be prepared if this does come up, my question is, are we ALL required to take service pets? I am not required to ADA compliant so would I be required to accept a service pet?
Someone please provide a link to the law on this if you know of one. Thanks!
Anyone who has a business in their home is required to take them period. I've sat through enough B&B classes to know this. B&Bs have in the past been sued for trying to refuse because it was their "home".
Riki
 

seashanty

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Jun 2, 2008
Messages
5,714
Reaction score
39
I see no reason why a person with a service animal should not have to register the animal and show some kind of proof when they want to fly, stay, cruise, etc with the animal. I don't need to know the reason for the animal ... but why not a real online registry? Not that this would stop determined cheaters. I think I posted here about overhearing a woman in a restaurant tell her family she was NOT going on vacation without the dog. She had purchased a special vest, harness and leash off the internet to show he is a service dog (he isn't). She also bought a laminated ID card to slip in the pocket of his service animal vest.
I posting here about having service dogs at the inn ... two were emotional support. One was enormous and I knew in advance, the other was unannounced, tiny and the man wore him in like an infant snuggie against his chest all the time.
 
Top