Flying out for week long interview/introduction - what kinds of things should we take?

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ServingSouthernComfort

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Hello Innspirers! I am so glad to have found you all! I have been reading and reading. The website is really what we were looking for. Y'all are REAL and we needed the TRUTH! Thanks! OK....
HURRAY! I think are getting very close to having employment. Yesterday tickets were purchased by our potential employers to fly out on the Sept. 21st and return on the 28th for a week long introduction/interview and, if it it looks like we are a good team - if we are a good fit, then to begin some training. I am scared to death =) excited, can hardly believe it, but hopeful! And, I've got questions...
I'm not sure if I am going to articulate my question right, but let me give it a try. I want to know what kinds of things should we take with us? I'm not asking if we should take toothpaste and a change of underwears ;) And I know to take notepads, computer, pens etc. I wanna know if we should take anything with us for the interview part of the week. They have said they will be giving us an opportunity work our "magic". Not quite sure what that means...I have written and asked. But I am thinking part of it will be to observe how well we work in tandem, maybe our cooking skills?? This will only be the second time we have gotten this far in the interview process and the last time it was a two day interview for managing/innkeeping an Inn that served a light continental breakfast that guests came and got from up in the clubroom on their way to wherever. (The current Innkeepers decided they wanted to stay after the owners told them they had someone who was ready to take the deal. UGH!) This is really different. The job description includes almost every aspect of being a B&B Innkeeper. It is small - 5 rooms - and we will have a chef available during peak season for larger groups, and a landscaper to come in a 2 or 3 times in the spring/summer months - but in general we will be IT.
So can y'all help me at all with this. I am hoping you know more what the question is that I am trying to ask than I do =) ~grin~
 

Penelope

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Is it possible to ship yourself a box full of your favorite tools? For example: favorite spatulas, most comfortable knife set, mixing bowls- things that are extensions of YOU that will make you more comfortable in their place? What about your own pillow for a good night's sleep? This is just me, but I would take my favorite coffee mug so that I get to drink my morning beverage out of something that is special to me. It would put me at ease and make me feel more comfortable, therefore make me more confident!
Good luck! I am excited for you!
 

Alibi Ike

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OK, I am your prospective employer. After a nice meet and greet, probably over drinks (how well do they hold their alcohol, do they drink to excess?) we'd talk about the day to day operations (are they taking notes, nodding like they agree, asking pertinent questions, showing they 'get it') and I'd let you know what time I expected to see you in the morning. 6 AM. Ready to rock n roll.
On the first morning I would expect you to watch and ask questions. We would take you thru the day as we handle it and expect more questions and possibly some observations on how you think this might be done better this way, have we tried it that way?
On the second day you would be cooking the breakfast so I would expect you to be asking to see the fridge and taking stock of what you need to buy to make that breakfast and handing off a shopping list to the present cook. I would also expect that by this time you would have already made yourself knowledgeable about what it is we do serve and not prepare something totally out of the ordinary or something that could not be repeated within the budget constraints. (So you should have asked about the budget beforehand.)
I'd be interested in your phone manner, how you handle check-ins, your design abilities if you are in charge of florals and room decorating. I'd have a series of 'how would you handle this?' queries. (I can say breakfast is 'take it or leave it' I would not expect an employee to do the same.)
If your responsibilities include marketing I'd expect to see an example of what you think needs to be done to increase room revenues and how you would do that and why you think that would work in this area.
How will you handle my tempermental cook? Does s/he have carte blanche in the kitchen or will you micro/manage?
Gardener? What plans do you have for the gardener?
On to room cleaning. I will expect to see you clean rooms. I will check to see if you are thorough. If I am not going to be an onsite owner, then you will need to either be doing the work or responsible for training. What kind of budget have you worked out for hiring seasonal employees?
Generally, I expect you to be totally conversant with our website, out guest policies, our blog. You need to know something about the area. (research in advance.)
I would expect you to approach us on what leeway you will have, what leeway you want, what you feel comfortable taking over, what you are not comfortable with. Not that you won't learn those things, but that right now you'd prefer to take our lead.
And. seriously, if you will have a chef for five rooms and a gardener the employers obviously have money that is not coming from the room rentals unless the rooms are going for $300+.
 

gillumhouse

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I like what Ike said. I would take my "knock their socks off" recipes (and have a few dietary needs recipes with you just in case they have one in-house). Do what you are going to do and be yourself bucause if you do a "put-on" just for the interview, you will not be able to maintain it. Consider yourselves Ike's breakfast options - they take you or leave you and consider yourselves winners whichever is the answer. Oftentimes, leave it may be the best in the long run. Not trying to jinx or be negative, just saying be YOU.
 

JBloggs

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I got lost in the post.
What is the specific question? Things to be to show you are professional innkeepers? A GREAT BIG SMILE.
 

ServingSouthernComfort

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Is it possible to ship yourself a box full of your favorite tools? For example: favorite spatulas, most comfortable knife set, mixing bowls- things that are extensions of YOU that will make you more comfortable in their place? What about your own pillow for a good night's sleep? This is just me, but I would take my favorite coffee mug so that I get to drink my morning beverage out of something that is special to me. It would put me at ease and make me feel more comfortable, therefore make me more confident!
Good luck! I am excited for you!.
These are interesting ideas...I hadn't thought about shipping out some of my favorite cooking/baking - especially my knives.
"This is just me, but I would take my favorite coffee mug so that I get to drink my morning beverage out of something that is special to me. It would put me at ease and make me feel more comfortable, therefore make me more confident!" sweet thought and easy enough to be accomplished.
Thanks Penelope!
 

ServingSouthernComfort

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I got lost in the post.
What is the specific question? Things to be to show you are professional innkeepers? A GREAT BIG SMILE..
=) HECK! I got lost, too...you know when you have a question but your not quite sure what it is...I live in that space! ~hee-hee~ Thanks for the chuckle!
 

JBloggs

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I just the topic again, a week long interview, bring deodorant. That is one heckuva interview process. And some aleve/advil and muscle rub.
If it were me, I would bring a notepad with some ideas, and input from me personally, then also to take notes. Are they paying you for the week? If not, you can come here for a week and work your magic, I will even feed you.
 

ServingSouthernComfort

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I just the topic again, a week long interview, bring deodorant. That is one heckuva interview process. And some aleve/advil and muscle rub.
If it were me, I would bring a notepad with some ideas, and input from me personally, then also to take notes. Are they paying you for the week? If not, you can come here for a week and work your magic, I will even feed you.
.
They are paying - not the big bucks, but fair. This is a WIN situation for us even if we do not get the job - we will have spent a week in a B&B, behind the scenes, learning. As long as they are willing to pay for the airfare and room & board, I'm going - I'd be game even if they didn't pay. But they sound like pretty fair people. We'll see.
Deodorant is a really good idea ;) And I don't go anywhere without my personal massage therapist (that's my sweet husband, D.) Hmmmm...we're a couple team....I don't know what he's gonna do ~ oh the advil and muscle rub!!! Great idea, Joey!
 

ServingSouthernComfort

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I like what Ike said. I would take my "knock their socks off" recipes (and have a few dietary needs recipes with you just in case they have one in-house). Do what you are going to do and be yourself bucause if you do a "put-on" just for the interview, you will not be able to maintain it. Consider yourselves Ike's breakfast options - they take you or leave you and consider yourselves winners whichever is the answer. Oftentimes, leave it may be the best in the long run. Not trying to jinx or be negative, just saying be YOU..
Got 'em!! In a spiral notebook. Smart idea to bring specal dietary recipes with. I have just the thing! Thanks for the encouragement!
 

ServingSouthernComfort

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I got lost in the post.
What is the specific question? Things to be to show you are professional innkeepers? A GREAT BIG SMILE..
Oh...and they already know we are NOT professional "innkeepers". Thank God! It's obvious from our resume - so we don't want to go in like we know it all, because we don't. And I think it will be obvious. I just want to appear that we have researched - studied some - found a good support forum made up of people who can read our minds when we don't know what to ask =) and who helps us! And THAT we indeed have done! We've done the research and still are AND we found y'all!!
 

ServingSouthernComfort

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OK, I am your prospective employer. After a nice meet and greet, probably over drinks (how well do they hold their alcohol, do they drink to excess?) we'd talk about the day to day operations (are they taking notes, nodding like they agree, asking pertinent questions, showing they 'get it') and I'd let you know what time I expected to see you in the morning. 6 AM. Ready to rock n roll.
On the first morning I would expect you to watch and ask questions. We would take you thru the day as we handle it and expect more questions and possibly some observations on how you think this might be done better this way, have we tried it that way?
On the second day you would be cooking the breakfast so I would expect you to be asking to see the fridge and taking stock of what you need to buy to make that breakfast and handing off a shopping list to the present cook. I would also expect that by this time you would have already made yourself knowledgeable about what it is we do serve and not prepare something totally out of the ordinary or something that could not be repeated within the budget constraints. (So you should have asked about the budget beforehand.)
I'd be interested in your phone manner, how you handle check-ins, your design abilities if you are in charge of florals and room decorating. I'd have a series of 'how would you handle this?' queries. (I can say breakfast is 'take it or leave it' I would not expect an employee to do the same.)
If your responsibilities include marketing I'd expect to see an example of what you think needs to be done to increase room revenues and how you would do that and why you think that would work in this area.
How will you handle my tempermental cook? Does s/he have carte blanche in the kitchen or will you micro/manage?
Gardener? What plans do you have for the gardener?
On to room cleaning. I will expect to see you clean rooms. I will check to see if you are thorough. If I am not going to be an onsite owner, then you will need to either be doing the work or responsible for training. What kind of budget have you worked out for hiring seasonal employees?
Generally, I expect you to be totally conversant with our website, out guest policies, our blog. You need to know something about the area. (research in advance.)
I would expect you to approach us on what leeway you will have, what leeway you want, what you feel comfortable taking over, what you are not comfortable with. Not that you won't learn those things, but that right now you'd prefer to take our lead.
And. seriously, if you will have a chef for five rooms and a gardener the employers obviously have money that is not coming from the room rentals unless the rooms are going for $300+..
You, my dear, are priceless! And I am so glad to be getting to know you!
Whether our potential employers have money, like a lot of money, I do not know; but I do know that the rooms DO NOT go for $300. A landscaper who comes on 2-3 times a year does not constitute a "gardener" in my eyes. I will be able to contract a chef if I have large enough group to warrant one.
A lot of what you have suggested here in a round about way answers my question of what to bring. For example: I have wondered if it would be appropriate to bring some marketing suggestions. I have time to create a couple of things specific to this B&B and so I think I'll do that and take it with me. If the right opportunity opens, then I'll have it at my fingertips.
D has a degree in History - he loves it. So he has been actively learning all he can about the rich history that is there.
 

Alibi Ike

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OK, I am your prospective employer. After a nice meet and greet, probably over drinks (how well do they hold their alcohol, do they drink to excess?) we'd talk about the day to day operations (are they taking notes, nodding like they agree, asking pertinent questions, showing they 'get it') and I'd let you know what time I expected to see you in the morning. 6 AM. Ready to rock n roll.
On the first morning I would expect you to watch and ask questions. We would take you thru the day as we handle it and expect more questions and possibly some observations on how you think this might be done better this way, have we tried it that way?
On the second day you would be cooking the breakfast so I would expect you to be asking to see the fridge and taking stock of what you need to buy to make that breakfast and handing off a shopping list to the present cook. I would also expect that by this time you would have already made yourself knowledgeable about what it is we do serve and not prepare something totally out of the ordinary or something that could not be repeated within the budget constraints. (So you should have asked about the budget beforehand.)
I'd be interested in your phone manner, how you handle check-ins, your design abilities if you are in charge of florals and room decorating. I'd have a series of 'how would you handle this?' queries. (I can say breakfast is 'take it or leave it' I would not expect an employee to do the same.)
If your responsibilities include marketing I'd expect to see an example of what you think needs to be done to increase room revenues and how you would do that and why you think that would work in this area.
How will you handle my tempermental cook? Does s/he have carte blanche in the kitchen or will you micro/manage?
Gardener? What plans do you have for the gardener?
On to room cleaning. I will expect to see you clean rooms. I will check to see if you are thorough. If I am not going to be an onsite owner, then you will need to either be doing the work or responsible for training. What kind of budget have you worked out for hiring seasonal employees?
Generally, I expect you to be totally conversant with our website, out guest policies, our blog. You need to know something about the area. (research in advance.)
I would expect you to approach us on what leeway you will have, what leeway you want, what you feel comfortable taking over, what you are not comfortable with. Not that you won't learn those things, but that right now you'd prefer to take our lead.
And. seriously, if you will have a chef for five rooms and a gardener the employers obviously have money that is not coming from the room rentals unless the rooms are going for $300+..
You, my dear, are priceless! And I am so glad to be getting to know you!
Whether our potential employers have money, like a lot of money, I do not know; but I do know that the rooms DO NOT go for $300. A landscaper who comes on 2-3 times a year does not constitute a "gardener" in my eyes. I will be able to contract a chef if I have large enough group to warrant one.
A lot of what you have suggested here in a round about way answers my question of what to bring. For example: I have wondered if it would be appropriate to bring some marketing suggestions. I have time to create a couple of things specific to this B&B and so I think I'll do that and take it with me. If the right opportunity opens, then I'll have it at my fingertips.
D has a degree in History - he loves it. So he has been actively learning all he can about the rich history that is there.
.
Your potential employer is PAYING for you, inexperienced as you are, to fly out for a week-long interview at a FIVE room B&B and you don't think they have money?
 

ServingSouthernComfort

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OK, I am your prospective employer. After a nice meet and greet, probably over drinks (how well do they hold their alcohol, do they drink to excess?) we'd talk about the day to day operations (are they taking notes, nodding like they agree, asking pertinent questions, showing they 'get it') and I'd let you know what time I expected to see you in the morning. 6 AM. Ready to rock n roll.
On the first morning I would expect you to watch and ask questions. We would take you thru the day as we handle it and expect more questions and possibly some observations on how you think this might be done better this way, have we tried it that way?
On the second day you would be cooking the breakfast so I would expect you to be asking to see the fridge and taking stock of what you need to buy to make that breakfast and handing off a shopping list to the present cook. I would also expect that by this time you would have already made yourself knowledgeable about what it is we do serve and not prepare something totally out of the ordinary or something that could not be repeated within the budget constraints. (So you should have asked about the budget beforehand.)
I'd be interested in your phone manner, how you handle check-ins, your design abilities if you are in charge of florals and room decorating. I'd have a series of 'how would you handle this?' queries. (I can say breakfast is 'take it or leave it' I would not expect an employee to do the same.)
If your responsibilities include marketing I'd expect to see an example of what you think needs to be done to increase room revenues and how you would do that and why you think that would work in this area.
How will you handle my tempermental cook? Does s/he have carte blanche in the kitchen or will you micro/manage?
Gardener? What plans do you have for the gardener?
On to room cleaning. I will expect to see you clean rooms. I will check to see if you are thorough. If I am not going to be an onsite owner, then you will need to either be doing the work or responsible for training. What kind of budget have you worked out for hiring seasonal employees?
Generally, I expect you to be totally conversant with our website, out guest policies, our blog. You need to know something about the area. (research in advance.)
I would expect you to approach us on what leeway you will have, what leeway you want, what you feel comfortable taking over, what you are not comfortable with. Not that you won't learn those things, but that right now you'd prefer to take our lead.
And. seriously, if you will have a chef for five rooms and a gardener the employers obviously have money that is not coming from the room rentals unless the rooms are going for $300+..
You, my dear, are priceless! And I am so glad to be getting to know you!
Whether our potential employers have money, like a lot of money, I do not know; but I do know that the rooms DO NOT go for $300. A landscaper who comes on 2-3 times a year does not constitute a "gardener" in my eyes. I will be able to contract a chef if I have large enough group to warrant one.
A lot of what you have suggested here in a round about way answers my question of what to bring. For example: I have wondered if it would be appropriate to bring some marketing suggestions. I have time to create a couple of things specific to this B&B and so I think I'll do that and take it with me. If the right opportunity opens, then I'll have it at my fingertips.
D has a degree in History - he loves it. So he has been actively learning all he can about the rich history that is there.
.
Your potential employer is PAYING for you, inexperienced as you are, to fly out for a week-long interview at a FIVE room B&B and you don't think they have money?
.
Yes. We are inexperienced. It seems to be an issue around here, but our inexperience is not an issue with them.
I gather the only people who are ever hired as Innkeepers are people who were once B&B owners? Really?
I rather like our prospectives attitude - they are looking to train us to be what they want their a Innkeeper. No one else around here came into innkeeping green?
Actually it is an 8 day total trip and yes, they are paying for ALL of it. I thought that is the way it always was. How on earth could an unemployed innkeeper afford to pay to go out and stay on an interview for a few days on an innkeepers salary. Maybe these potentials do have money. I have read job ads where they employer wrote, "Must be willing to interview in person at your own expense." or "We will not be paying applicants to travel for interview." But, I just assumed that if they wanted an innkeeper to travel for an interview that it would be on the employer. It never even crossed my mind that if we were going out there for a week that they would NOT be paying. Go figure. That's what inexperience gets ya! ;)
How long you been a innkeeper, Ali?
 

gillumhouse

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OK, I am your prospective employer. After a nice meet and greet, probably over drinks (how well do they hold their alcohol, do they drink to excess?) we'd talk about the day to day operations (are they taking notes, nodding like they agree, asking pertinent questions, showing they 'get it') and I'd let you know what time I expected to see you in the morning. 6 AM. Ready to rock n roll.
On the first morning I would expect you to watch and ask questions. We would take you thru the day as we handle it and expect more questions and possibly some observations on how you think this might be done better this way, have we tried it that way?
On the second day you would be cooking the breakfast so I would expect you to be asking to see the fridge and taking stock of what you need to buy to make that breakfast and handing off a shopping list to the present cook. I would also expect that by this time you would have already made yourself knowledgeable about what it is we do serve and not prepare something totally out of the ordinary or something that could not be repeated within the budget constraints. (So you should have asked about the budget beforehand.)
I'd be interested in your phone manner, how you handle check-ins, your design abilities if you are in charge of florals and room decorating. I'd have a series of 'how would you handle this?' queries. (I can say breakfast is 'take it or leave it' I would not expect an employee to do the same.)
If your responsibilities include marketing I'd expect to see an example of what you think needs to be done to increase room revenues and how you would do that and why you think that would work in this area.
How will you handle my tempermental cook? Does s/he have carte blanche in the kitchen or will you micro/manage?
Gardener? What plans do you have for the gardener?
On to room cleaning. I will expect to see you clean rooms. I will check to see if you are thorough. If I am not going to be an onsite owner, then you will need to either be doing the work or responsible for training. What kind of budget have you worked out for hiring seasonal employees?
Generally, I expect you to be totally conversant with our website, out guest policies, our blog. You need to know something about the area. (research in advance.)
I would expect you to approach us on what leeway you will have, what leeway you want, what you feel comfortable taking over, what you are not comfortable with. Not that you won't learn those things, but that right now you'd prefer to take our lead.
And. seriously, if you will have a chef for five rooms and a gardener the employers obviously have money that is not coming from the room rentals unless the rooms are going for $300+..
You, my dear, are priceless! And I am so glad to be getting to know you!
Whether our potential employers have money, like a lot of money, I do not know; but I do know that the rooms DO NOT go for $300. A landscaper who comes on 2-3 times a year does not constitute a "gardener" in my eyes. I will be able to contract a chef if I have large enough group to warrant one.
A lot of what you have suggested here in a round about way answers my question of what to bring. For example: I have wondered if it would be appropriate to bring some marketing suggestions. I have time to create a couple of things specific to this B&B and so I think I'll do that and take it with me. If the right opportunity opens, then I'll have it at my fingertips.
D has a degree in History - he loves it. So he has been actively learning all he can about the rich history that is there.
.
Your potential employer is PAYING for you, inexperienced as you are, to fly out for a week-long interview at a FIVE room B&B and you don't think they have money?
.
Yes. We are inexperienced. It seems to be an issue around here, but our inexperience is not an issue with them.
I gather the only people who are ever hired as Innkeepers are people who were once B&B owners? Really?
I rather like our prospectives attitude - they are looking to train us to be what they want their a Innkeeper. No one else around here came into innkeeping green?
Actually it is an 8 day total trip and yes, they are paying for ALL of it. I thought that is the way it always was. How on earth could an unemployed innkeeper afford to pay to go out and stay on an interview for a few days on an innkeepers salary. Maybe these potentials do have money. I have read job ads where they employer wrote, "Must be willing to interview in person at your own expense." or "We will not be paying applicants to travel for interview." But, I just assumed that if they wanted an innkeeper to travel for an interview that it would be on the employer. It never even crossed my mind that if we were going out there for a week that they would NOT be paying. Go figure. That's what inexperience gets ya! ;)
How long you been a innkeeper, Ali?
.
ServingSouthernComfort said:
Yes. We are inexperienced. It seems to be an issue around here, but our inexperience is not an issue with them.
I gather the only people who are ever hired as Innkeepers are people who were once B&B owners? Really?
I rather like our prospectives attitude - they are looking to train us to be what they want their a Innkeeper. No one else around here came into innkeeping green?
Lots of us just dove in - but with our own B & B whether a turnkey or a start-up. Retaining ownership and turning "my baby" over to someone else is another story...... I would be a nervous nellie about it because the right people would be great but the wrong ones could ruin the business AND its reputation.
 

Alibi Ike

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OK, I am your prospective employer. After a nice meet and greet, probably over drinks (how well do they hold their alcohol, do they drink to excess?) we'd talk about the day to day operations (are they taking notes, nodding like they agree, asking pertinent questions, showing they 'get it') and I'd let you know what time I expected to see you in the morning. 6 AM. Ready to rock n roll.
On the first morning I would expect you to watch and ask questions. We would take you thru the day as we handle it and expect more questions and possibly some observations on how you think this might be done better this way, have we tried it that way?
On the second day you would be cooking the breakfast so I would expect you to be asking to see the fridge and taking stock of what you need to buy to make that breakfast and handing off a shopping list to the present cook. I would also expect that by this time you would have already made yourself knowledgeable about what it is we do serve and not prepare something totally out of the ordinary or something that could not be repeated within the budget constraints. (So you should have asked about the budget beforehand.)
I'd be interested in your phone manner, how you handle check-ins, your design abilities if you are in charge of florals and room decorating. I'd have a series of 'how would you handle this?' queries. (I can say breakfast is 'take it or leave it' I would not expect an employee to do the same.)
If your responsibilities include marketing I'd expect to see an example of what you think needs to be done to increase room revenues and how you would do that and why you think that would work in this area.
How will you handle my tempermental cook? Does s/he have carte blanche in the kitchen or will you micro/manage?
Gardener? What plans do you have for the gardener?
On to room cleaning. I will expect to see you clean rooms. I will check to see if you are thorough. If I am not going to be an onsite owner, then you will need to either be doing the work or responsible for training. What kind of budget have you worked out for hiring seasonal employees?
Generally, I expect you to be totally conversant with our website, out guest policies, our blog. You need to know something about the area. (research in advance.)
I would expect you to approach us on what leeway you will have, what leeway you want, what you feel comfortable taking over, what you are not comfortable with. Not that you won't learn those things, but that right now you'd prefer to take our lead.
And. seriously, if you will have a chef for five rooms and a gardener the employers obviously have money that is not coming from the room rentals unless the rooms are going for $300+..
You, my dear, are priceless! And I am so glad to be getting to know you!
Whether our potential employers have money, like a lot of money, I do not know; but I do know that the rooms DO NOT go for $300. A landscaper who comes on 2-3 times a year does not constitute a "gardener" in my eyes. I will be able to contract a chef if I have large enough group to warrant one.
A lot of what you have suggested here in a round about way answers my question of what to bring. For example: I have wondered if it would be appropriate to bring some marketing suggestions. I have time to create a couple of things specific to this B&B and so I think I'll do that and take it with me. If the right opportunity opens, then I'll have it at my fingertips.
D has a degree in History - he loves it. So he has been actively learning all he can about the rich history that is there.
.
Your potential employer is PAYING for you, inexperienced as you are, to fly out for a week-long interview at a FIVE room B&B and you don't think they have money?
.
Yes. We are inexperienced. It seems to be an issue around here, but our inexperience is not an issue with them.
I gather the only people who are ever hired as Innkeepers are people who were once B&B owners? Really?
I rather like our prospectives attitude - they are looking to train us to be what they want their a Innkeeper. No one else around here came into innkeeping green?
Actually it is an 8 day total trip and yes, they are paying for ALL of it. I thought that is the way it always was. How on earth could an unemployed innkeeper afford to pay to go out and stay on an interview for a few days on an innkeepers salary. Maybe these potentials do have money. I have read job ads where they employer wrote, "Must be willing to interview in person at your own expense." or "We will not be paying applicants to travel for interview." But, I just assumed that if they wanted an innkeeper to travel for an interview that it would be on the employer. It never even crossed my mind that if we were going out there for a week that they would NOT be paying. Go figure. That's what inexperience gets ya! ;)
How long you been a innkeeper, Ali?
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ServingSouthernComfort said:
Actually it is an 8 day total trip and yes, they are paying for ALL of it. I thought that is the way it always was.
If they found your online info and approached you for the job, then yes they pay. If you applied for a job, you pay. If you applied and they are paying you are walking into a goldmine.
If they can afford an all-expense paid interview, the are making money hand over fist or they are independently wealthy. All of which you should tuck into your bag of knowledge going into this. They can AFFORD to pay you, make sure you get paid appropriately.
8 days? I think it's too good to be true so keep your antennae up. Find out everything you can. As a matter of fact, I would be doing a check on their corporate status to see what else they own. They may have a dozen properties. All good stuff to know.
 

Samster

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Be prepared to answer some questions about your team: Who will handle what aspects of the business? Can the other one pitch-hit if say for example, the primary cook gets sick? (My dh can't cook a bit...and there was no training him at this stage of the game.)
It is pretty surprising that an inn of that size has the resources to fly a couple in for a week-long interview process. It must be very profitable or the innkeepers have money from another source.
 

ServingSouthernComfort

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OK, I am your prospective employer. After a nice meet and greet, probably over drinks (how well do they hold their alcohol, do they drink to excess?) we'd talk about the day to day operations (are they taking notes, nodding like they agree, asking pertinent questions, showing they 'get it') and I'd let you know what time I expected to see you in the morning. 6 AM. Ready to rock n roll.
On the first morning I would expect you to watch and ask questions. We would take you thru the day as we handle it and expect more questions and possibly some observations on how you think this might be done better this way, have we tried it that way?
On the second day you would be cooking the breakfast so I would expect you to be asking to see the fridge and taking stock of what you need to buy to make that breakfast and handing off a shopping list to the present cook. I would also expect that by this time you would have already made yourself knowledgeable about what it is we do serve and not prepare something totally out of the ordinary or something that could not be repeated within the budget constraints. (So you should have asked about the budget beforehand.)
I'd be interested in your phone manner, how you handle check-ins, your design abilities if you are in charge of florals and room decorating. I'd have a series of 'how would you handle this?' queries. (I can say breakfast is 'take it or leave it' I would not expect an employee to do the same.)
If your responsibilities include marketing I'd expect to see an example of what you think needs to be done to increase room revenues and how you would do that and why you think that would work in this area.
How will you handle my tempermental cook? Does s/he have carte blanche in the kitchen or will you micro/manage?
Gardener? What plans do you have for the gardener?
On to room cleaning. I will expect to see you clean rooms. I will check to see if you are thorough. If I am not going to be an onsite owner, then you will need to either be doing the work or responsible for training. What kind of budget have you worked out for hiring seasonal employees?
Generally, I expect you to be totally conversant with our website, out guest policies, our blog. You need to know something about the area. (research in advance.)
I would expect you to approach us on what leeway you will have, what leeway you want, what you feel comfortable taking over, what you are not comfortable with. Not that you won't learn those things, but that right now you'd prefer to take our lead.
And. seriously, if you will have a chef for five rooms and a gardener the employers obviously have money that is not coming from the room rentals unless the rooms are going for $300+..
You, my dear, are priceless! And I am so glad to be getting to know you!
Whether our potential employers have money, like a lot of money, I do not know; but I do know that the rooms DO NOT go for $300. A landscaper who comes on 2-3 times a year does not constitute a "gardener" in my eyes. I will be able to contract a chef if I have large enough group to warrant one.
A lot of what you have suggested here in a round about way answers my question of what to bring. For example: I have wondered if it would be appropriate to bring some marketing suggestions. I have time to create a couple of things specific to this B&B and so I think I'll do that and take it with me. If the right opportunity opens, then I'll have it at my fingertips.
D has a degree in History - he loves it. So he has been actively learning all he can about the rich history that is there.
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Your potential employer is PAYING for you, inexperienced as you are, to fly out for a week-long interview at a FIVE room B&B and you don't think they have money?
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Yes. We are inexperienced. It seems to be an issue around here, but our inexperience is not an issue with them.
I gather the only people who are ever hired as Innkeepers are people who were once B&B owners? Really?
I rather like our prospectives attitude - they are looking to train us to be what they want their a Innkeeper. No one else around here came into innkeeping green?
Actually it is an 8 day total trip and yes, they are paying for ALL of it. I thought that is the way it always was. How on earth could an unemployed innkeeper afford to pay to go out and stay on an interview for a few days on an innkeepers salary. Maybe these potentials do have money. I have read job ads where they employer wrote, "Must be willing to interview in person at your own expense." or "We will not be paying applicants to travel for interview." But, I just assumed that if they wanted an innkeeper to travel for an interview that it would be on the employer. It never even crossed my mind that if we were going out there for a week that they would NOT be paying. Go figure. That's what inexperience gets ya! ;)
How long you been a innkeeper, Ali?
.
ServingSouthernComfort said:
Actually it is an 8 day total trip and yes, they are paying for ALL of it. I thought that is the way it always was.
If they found your online info and approached you for the job, then yes they pay. If you applied for a job, you pay. If you applied and they are paying you are walking into a goldmine.
If they can afford an all-expense paid interview, the are making money hand over fist or they are independently wealthy. All of which you should tuck into your bag of knowledge going into this. They can AFFORD to pay you, make sure you get paid appropriately.
8 days? I think it's too good to be true so keep your antennae up. Find out everything you can. As a matter of fact, I would be doing a check on their corporate status to see what else they own. They may have a dozen properties. All good stuff to know.
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Well, there you go....they found us. Good to know the ediquette.
"8 days? I think it's too good to be true so keep your antennae up." Well, that is what the tickets says - Depart Wednesday - September 21st Return Wednesday September 28th. They assured us that all expenses are paid. So I hope they are people of their word. We will get an opportunity to see if we think we will like the area - a whole day on our own, which I like because I figure we can get a feel for what kind of reputation they have in town.
You said: "keep your antennae up. Find out everything you can. As a matter of fact, I would be doing a check on their corporate status to see what else they own. They may have a dozen properties. All good stuff to know." This is helpful. My first question to the group was to ask about salary. You gave me some good advice about looking into their gross receipts etc. I have been working to that end.
And then...when I get back I'll come one and tell you either "oooohhhhh noooooo way!!!!" and then give you all the c r a z y juicy details. Or, I'll be telling y'all we are taking an employer paid road trip to our new home.
We're risktakers. We try not to be fools, but now and then our risk taking has made a fool of us.
 

ServingSouthernComfort

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Be prepared to answer some questions about your team: Who will handle what aspects of the business? Can the other one pitch-hit if say for example, the primary cook gets sick? (My dh can't cook a bit...and there was no training him at this stage of the game.)
It is pretty surprising that an inn of that size has the resources to fly a couple in for a week-long interview process. It must be very profitable or the innkeepers have money from another source..
Good point, Samster. In fact, D and I have been taking cooking classes - but I definately the better cook. I can do some light maintainance - we can trade evenly when it come to office stuff.
"It is pretty surprising that an inn of that size has the resources to fly a couple in for a week-long interview process. It must be very profitable or the innkeepers have money from another source."
You are not alone in your question of this, Samster. ~ she says as she shrugs her shoulders~
 

JBloggs

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Sad to say this aloud, but if we knew what the inn was or where, we might be able to give you a heads up, since this forum is very broad reaching. But no, don't do it, don't tell us, it would be a huge mistake.
Wonder if it is the place one of our members is leaving shortly? I would hire someone without inn experience if I liked them, absolutely, and in fact I might not hire 75% of innkeepers I find (elsewhere online) who I think couldn't handle it. Not here, of course, you are all stellar and above par.

Innkeepers vs running the business? How much will you be doing? What will you NOT be doing? (that is one question I would have during this process). Then you can assess the position better.
What do hired innkeepers do? If the occupancy is high then they hire housekeepers, if it is not high (like ours) then we do it all ourselves. If we needed to hire innkeepers here for whatever reason full time, they would have to clean the rooms, mow the lawns, maintain the grounds etc, as we do.
Just thinking aloud... A B&B not too far from us has hired innkeepers permantently on staff. The owners travel and do other things. There is no way their occupancy is close to ours, they are in the middle of nowhere.
 
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