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Food cost question for B&B's

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Forfeng

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This topic sort of started on https://www.innspiring.com/node/5487 and was off topic (probably my bad) and that brought up something that I am perenially curious about with B&Bs. If this question has been covered already somewhere in the forums already would appreciate a link or direct over to.
My question or questions are these:
How many of y'all actually do cost out your breakfasts or just wing it?
If you are costing your breakfasts are you also factoring in overhead (lights, gas etc) and labor (whether it be estimated your time cost or an employee cost)
Of the ones that do cost it out, do you put your yields in when you are factoring your costs?
If you are costing, are you taking into account variable costs when cooking, i.e. frost/draught in California raised the price of strawberries by $4 a lb. so you sub a less expensive fruit or use less.
Thanks :)
 

gillumhouse

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I basically wing it. I buy what is on special in fruits, bulk buy when possible for things like eggs (on sale for $1 per dozen, I stock up), cranberries in November and into the freezer locker, flour was $1.50 per 5 lb and stocked up for the year... If strawberries are $4 per lb, my guests get the blueberries that were on sale for $1 per pint and then went to the freezer.
What I throw out most is the non-citric juice during slow season because I may go a week or a month without guests - but I had to open that bottle for that one breakfast.....
 

egoodell

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Considering we only have two rooms this is a little more than we need to do to run our place right now. I know we'll figure out portion control more when we get to 5 rooms.
My husband managed restaurants for 20 years and can do a lot of this in his head.
We don't substitute quality because of costs. We are not running a 100 seat restaurant, just two rooms and cheese plates for wine tours.
Since we do purchase a good amount some of the vendors give us a discount.
We will be pursuing this direction with the cheese I think since it is costly. I'm going to contact one of the online vendors to see if I can prepay for bulk and have it shipped in increments. That's a tip I got from a Chef at the Virginia Conference at the Homestead.
Plus I found a locally made nationally known hard goat cheese that I can buy in bulk that keeps for two months
Riki
 

Forfeng

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Considering we only have two rooms this is a little more than we need to do to run our place right now. I know we'll figure out portion control more when we get to 5 rooms.
My husband managed restaurants for 20 years and can do a lot of this in his head.
We don't substitute quality because of costs. We are not running a 100 seat restaurant, just two rooms and cheese plates for wine tours.
Since we do purchase a good amount some of the vendors give us a discount.
We will be pursuing this direction with the cheese I think since it is costly. I'm going to contact one of the online vendors to see if I can prepay for bulk and have it shipped in increments. That's a tip I got from a Chef at the Virginia Conference at the Homestead.
Plus I found a locally made nationally known hard goat cheese that I can buy in bulk that keeps for two months
Riki.
The reason I ask about costs, is because I have friends and other inns I work with, that when we sit down and really analyze the cost analysis of what they are serving, when we run the numbers and we find out they have figured costs wrong or just wung it, it can be hundreds of dollars worth of loss per month vs what they thought they were doing ok with.
Most innkeepers I know don't have restaurant backgrounds so its not something most people think about. Because so many places do the choc dipped strawberries to use that as an example, they don't adjust the price when the market varies, The general thing I hear is "it will all even out"
For a smaller place with only a couple of rooms its definetely not as much off an issue, but a 6 roomer or more can loose some serious money on breakfast. With the economy still the way it is, (and even if it was much better) I would think every penny would count.
 

JBloggs

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I use as much fresh and local as possible. I do have a budget and know exactly what everything costs from day to day - ie when in season you get in season. Thankfully out of season here is in season for melons in Costa Rica or South America. Example pineapples are $2.50 right now - good deal!
I always work out the best bang for my buck - as mentioned when Blueberries are ripe in NC or NJ we have plenty of blueberries - and our guests are many times one night or two nights so I can make the same thing some times four days in a row and have diff guests! When the u-pick berries are in everybody gets fresh colonial strawberries. :)
When we have a special diet - that is when I am thrown off track - vegan or someone with special dietary requirements - so I need to buy things I normally do not have on hand like soy or rice milk.
We have no staff, the lights, the a/c the heat are on regardless or 1 person or 10 people.
 

JBloggs

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Considering we only have two rooms this is a little more than we need to do to run our place right now. I know we'll figure out portion control more when we get to 5 rooms.
My husband managed restaurants for 20 years and can do a lot of this in his head.
We don't substitute quality because of costs. We are not running a 100 seat restaurant, just two rooms and cheese plates for wine tours.
Since we do purchase a good amount some of the vendors give us a discount.
We will be pursuing this direction with the cheese I think since it is costly. I'm going to contact one of the online vendors to see if I can prepay for bulk and have it shipped in increments. That's a tip I got from a Chef at the Virginia Conference at the Homestead.
Plus I found a locally made nationally known hard goat cheese that I can buy in bulk that keeps for two months
Riki.
The reason I ask about costs, is because I have friends and other inns I work with, that when we sit down and really analyze the cost analysis of what they are serving, when we run the numbers and we find out they have figured costs wrong or just wung it, it can be hundreds of dollars worth of loss per month vs what they thought they were doing ok with.
Most innkeepers I know don't have restaurant backgrounds so its not something most people think about. Because so many places do the choc dipped strawberries to use that as an example, they don't adjust the price when the market varies, The general thing I hear is "it will all even out"
For a smaller place with only a couple of rooms its definetely not as much off an issue, but a 6 roomer or more can loose some serious money on breakfast. With the economy still the way it is, (and even if it was much better) I would think every penny would count.
.
Forfeng said:
The reason I ask about costs, is because I have friends and other inns I work with, that when we sit down and really analyze the cost analysis of what they are serving, when we run the numbers and we find out they have figured costs wrong or just wung it, it can be hundreds of dollars worth of loss per month vs what they thought they were doing ok with.
Most innkeepers I know don't have restaurant backgrounds so its not something most people think about. Because so many places do the choc dipped strawberries to use that as an example, they don't adjust the price when the market varies, The general thing I hear is "it will all even out"
For a smaller place with only a couple of rooms its definetely not as much off an issue, but a 6 roomer or more can loose some serious money on breakfast. With the economy still the way it is, (and even if it was much better) I would think every penny would count.
I don't know of anyone here that does that, this is a fairly thrifty bunch who want the guests to perceive added value but also a classy breakfast. I hear what you are saying and it is a very wasteful and lazy habit to be in. I think on this forum you will find innkeepers who may test different recipes and find what works best for their clientele and region.
 

egoodell

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Considering we only have two rooms this is a little more than we need to do to run our place right now. I know we'll figure out portion control more when we get to 5 rooms.
My husband managed restaurants for 20 years and can do a lot of this in his head.
We don't substitute quality because of costs. We are not running a 100 seat restaurant, just two rooms and cheese plates for wine tours.
Since we do purchase a good amount some of the vendors give us a discount.
We will be pursuing this direction with the cheese I think since it is costly. I'm going to contact one of the online vendors to see if I can prepay for bulk and have it shipped in increments. That's a tip I got from a Chef at the Virginia Conference at the Homestead.
Plus I found a locally made nationally known hard goat cheese that I can buy in bulk that keeps for two months
Riki.
The reason I ask about costs, is because I have friends and other inns I work with, that when we sit down and really analyze the cost analysis of what they are serving, when we run the numbers and we find out they have figured costs wrong or just wung it, it can be hundreds of dollars worth of loss per month vs what they thought they were doing ok with.
Most innkeepers I know don't have restaurant backgrounds so its not something most people think about. Because so many places do the choc dipped strawberries to use that as an example, they don't adjust the price when the market varies, The general thing I hear is "it will all even out"
For a smaller place with only a couple of rooms its definetely not as much off an issue, but a 6 roomer or more can loose some serious money on breakfast. With the economy still the way it is, (and even if it was much better) I would think every penny would count.
.
Forfeng said:
Most innkeepers I know don't have restaurant backgrounds so its not something most people think about. Because so many places do the choc dipped strawberries to use that as an example, they don't adjust the price when the market varies, The general thing I hear is "it will all even out"
I have chocolate dipped strawberries as an "add on" for $12.
You are saying that I should charge more or less when the prices of strawberries change???
That would mean I'd have to change the price on the website, in my management system, etc.
We figure a price taking into considerations high and low and come up with an average, and compare it against what the others are charging.
There's something to be said for the value of my time, as well.
RIki
 

Forfeng

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Considering we only have two rooms this is a little more than we need to do to run our place right now. I know we'll figure out portion control more when we get to 5 rooms.
My husband managed restaurants for 20 years and can do a lot of this in his head.
We don't substitute quality because of costs. We are not running a 100 seat restaurant, just two rooms and cheese plates for wine tours.
Since we do purchase a good amount some of the vendors give us a discount.
We will be pursuing this direction with the cheese I think since it is costly. I'm going to contact one of the online vendors to see if I can prepay for bulk and have it shipped in increments. That's a tip I got from a Chef at the Virginia Conference at the Homestead.
Plus I found a locally made nationally known hard goat cheese that I can buy in bulk that keeps for two months
Riki.
The reason I ask about costs, is because I have friends and other inns I work with, that when we sit down and really analyze the cost analysis of what they are serving, when we run the numbers and we find out they have figured costs wrong or just wung it, it can be hundreds of dollars worth of loss per month vs what they thought they were doing ok with.
Most innkeepers I know don't have restaurant backgrounds so its not something most people think about. Because so many places do the choc dipped strawberries to use that as an example, they don't adjust the price when the market varies, The general thing I hear is "it will all even out"
For a smaller place with only a couple of rooms its definetely not as much off an issue, but a 6 roomer or more can loose some serious money on breakfast. With the economy still the way it is, (and even if it was much better) I would think every penny would count.
.
Forfeng said:
Most innkeepers I know don't have restaurant backgrounds so its not something most people think about. Because so many places do the choc dipped strawberries to use that as an example, they don't adjust the price when the market varies, The general thing I hear is "it will all even out"
I have chocolate dipped strawberries as an "add on" for $12.
You are saying that I should charge more or less when the prices of strawberries change???
That would mean I'd have to change the price on the website, in my management system, etc.
We figure a price taking into considerations high and low and come up with an average, and compare it against what the others are charging.
There's something to be said for the value of my time, as well.
RIki
.
I agree, I am not saying you should or should not change the price, it was more was a generalized questions out of curiosity. Your time is very valuable as I well know and there never seems to be enough of it.
To answer the question about lower or higher on the price, never lower though, the extra profit is always good. But say strawberries go up and stay up for a long period of time, then it might be something worth the time to change.
I know many innkeepers take the time to raise their valentine's day price for packages and or add on bouquets because roses invariably double/triple in price around that time. If its only one or two orders of choc strawberries a week at the higher price it wouldn't be a big deal but if you are going through 12 orders a day and the cost is 3 bucks higher...... Whats your time worth vs cost of goods sold, would be my takeaway.
Sorry to question or raise the questions, I am always curious about the differences between restaurants and innkeeping and as a former chef used to nitpick costs to death. Thats why I ask, just to be a pain in the tuckus :)
 

Morticia

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Considering we only have two rooms this is a little more than we need to do to run our place right now. I know we'll figure out portion control more when we get to 5 rooms.
My husband managed restaurants for 20 years and can do a lot of this in his head.
We don't substitute quality because of costs. We are not running a 100 seat restaurant, just two rooms and cheese plates for wine tours.
Since we do purchase a good amount some of the vendors give us a discount.
We will be pursuing this direction with the cheese I think since it is costly. I'm going to contact one of the online vendors to see if I can prepay for bulk and have it shipped in increments. That's a tip I got from a Chef at the Virginia Conference at the Homestead.
Plus I found a locally made nationally known hard goat cheese that I can buy in bulk that keeps for two months
Riki.
The reason I ask about costs, is because I have friends and other inns I work with, that when we sit down and really analyze the cost analysis of what they are serving, when we run the numbers and we find out they have figured costs wrong or just wung it, it can be hundreds of dollars worth of loss per month vs what they thought they were doing ok with.
Most innkeepers I know don't have restaurant backgrounds so its not something most people think about. Because so many places do the choc dipped strawberries to use that as an example, they don't adjust the price when the market varies, The general thing I hear is "it will all even out"
For a smaller place with only a couple of rooms its definetely not as much off an issue, but a 6 roomer or more can loose some serious money on breakfast. With the economy still the way it is, (and even if it was much better) I would think every penny would count.
.
We don't do food add ons, and it would be hard to have a guest book an add on in June for a stay in Jan and then tell them the price was up $10 because of a frost. Even tho they know this.
And we can't raise rates when food prices go up as they did dramatically last year.
I know we lose out because we don't buy in bulk. We shop every day for the next day's breakfast and only freeze things like blueberries and butter. Our growing season is so short here that for 8 months of the year I'd be serving apples and blueberries and potatoes and that's it if we didn't just close our eyes and buy fresh fruit all winter.
 

aieechihuahua

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Chef... I am such a small inn, with so little overhead. The day I have to cost out my breakfast for ANY reason is the day I close my doors. I know this probably IS a thing for some people, but waaaaaay too much trouble for me.
Anyway....food is the last thing that should be the least bit compromised at a b&b. The other thing is the bed and linens. If I want to call myself a bed and breakfast...both of those two things must be exceptional, at any cost. Or close it. The rest is just fluff.
Never - ever - ever - cut food costs for breakfast at a b&b. and Never, ever, ever put a cut rate mattress and sheets in a b&b. Or change your name to something else.
IMHO.
 

Forfeng

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I love the feedback so far, thanks you guys (and gals) much appreciated.
Please don't ever comprimise your food, I would sooner have a lobotomy then do that myself. I think this all was sparked by the lovely and vivacious Morticia, may she and Gomez live a long and scary life, asking about portion control info and off course being the blonde I am couldn't resist asking obnoxious questions :)
 

YellowSocks

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Considering we only have two rooms this is a little more than we need to do to run our place right now. I know we'll figure out portion control more when we get to 5 rooms.
My husband managed restaurants for 20 years and can do a lot of this in his head.
We don't substitute quality because of costs. We are not running a 100 seat restaurant, just two rooms and cheese plates for wine tours.
Since we do purchase a good amount some of the vendors give us a discount.
We will be pursuing this direction with the cheese I think since it is costly. I'm going to contact one of the online vendors to see if I can prepay for bulk and have it shipped in increments. That's a tip I got from a Chef at the Virginia Conference at the Homestead.
Plus I found a locally made nationally known hard goat cheese that I can buy in bulk that keeps for two months
Riki.
The reason I ask about costs, is because I have friends and other inns I work with, that when we sit down and really analyze the cost analysis of what they are serving, when we run the numbers and we find out they have figured costs wrong or just wung it, it can be hundreds of dollars worth of loss per month vs what they thought they were doing ok with.
Most innkeepers I know don't have restaurant backgrounds so its not something most people think about. Because so many places do the choc dipped strawberries to use that as an example, they don't adjust the price when the market varies, The general thing I hear is "it will all even out"
For a smaller place with only a couple of rooms its definetely not as much off an issue, but a 6 roomer or more can loose some serious money on breakfast. With the economy still the way it is, (and even if it was much better) I would think every penny would count.
.
Forfeng said:
Most innkeepers I know don't have restaurant backgrounds so its not something most people think about. Because so many places do the choc dipped strawberries to use that as an example, they don't adjust the price when the market varies, The general thing I hear is "it will all even out"
I have chocolate dipped strawberries as an "add on" for $12.
You are saying that I should charge more or less when the prices of strawberries change???
That would mean I'd have to change the price on the website, in my management system, etc.
We figure a price taking into considerations high and low and come up with an average, and compare it against what the others are charging.
There's something to be said for the value of my time, as well.
RIki
.
egoodell said:
I have chocolate dipped strawberries as an "add on" for $12.
How many strawberries do you do for that? I did a special for Valentine's Day and want to do add ons, too, but I wasn't sure how many to make.
Thanks!
=)
Kk.
 

YellowSocks

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I guess I "wing it" but that's because it is what it is. I buy the premium OJ and real butter... but I get as many of my groceries as possible from Aldi... which I find to be cheaper than Sam's Club. I only have to go Wally World for puff pastry (which I don't use that much of) and fillo dough (which I do) and berries when they're out of season. A few times a year I go to a restaurant/food service store and stock up on sausage links and Canadian bacon... best quality for best price.
We generally serve whatever fruit is in season, which means available at Aldi. The exception to that is strawberries, which are an integral part of one of my two signature dishes, so I buy those year round... well, except for the first week in November when they're $5 for a half pint at the premier grocery store. Then I make something else...
=)
Kk.
 

egoodell

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Considering we only have two rooms this is a little more than we need to do to run our place right now. I know we'll figure out portion control more when we get to 5 rooms.
My husband managed restaurants for 20 years and can do a lot of this in his head.
We don't substitute quality because of costs. We are not running a 100 seat restaurant, just two rooms and cheese plates for wine tours.
Since we do purchase a good amount some of the vendors give us a discount.
We will be pursuing this direction with the cheese I think since it is costly. I'm going to contact one of the online vendors to see if I can prepay for bulk and have it shipped in increments. That's a tip I got from a Chef at the Virginia Conference at the Homestead.
Plus I found a locally made nationally known hard goat cheese that I can buy in bulk that keeps for two months
Riki.
The reason I ask about costs, is because I have friends and other inns I work with, that when we sit down and really analyze the cost analysis of what they are serving, when we run the numbers and we find out they have figured costs wrong or just wung it, it can be hundreds of dollars worth of loss per month vs what they thought they were doing ok with.
Most innkeepers I know don't have restaurant backgrounds so its not something most people think about. Because so many places do the choc dipped strawberries to use that as an example, they don't adjust the price when the market varies, The general thing I hear is "it will all even out"
For a smaller place with only a couple of rooms its definetely not as much off an issue, but a 6 roomer or more can loose some serious money on breakfast. With the economy still the way it is, (and even if it was much better) I would think every penny would count.
.
Forfeng said:
Most innkeepers I know don't have restaurant backgrounds so its not something most people think about. Because so many places do the choc dipped strawberries to use that as an example, they don't adjust the price when the market varies, The general thing I hear is "it will all even out"
I have chocolate dipped strawberries as an "add on" for $12.
You are saying that I should charge more or less when the prices of strawberries change???
That would mean I'd have to change the price on the website, in my management system, etc.
We figure a price taking into considerations high and low and come up with an average, and compare it against what the others are charging.
There's something to be said for the value of my time, as well.
RIki
.
egoodell said:
I have chocolate dipped strawberries as an "add on" for $12.
How many strawberries do you do for that? I did a special for Valentine's Day and want to do add ons, too, but I wasn't sure how many to make.
Thanks!
=)
Kk.
.
YellowSocks said:
egoodell said:
I have chocolate dipped strawberries as an "add on" for $12.
How many strawberries do you do for that? I did a special for Valentine's Day and want to do add ons, too, but I wasn't sure how many to make.
Thanks!
=)
Kk.
I do six. I don't find that they will eat more than that around here. I get a premium chocolate and use the microwave. To make it more liquid to drizzle I mix in a little coconut oil. I think it's coconut oil. I may have to go look at the jar to be sure. It makes it glossy and more liquid to drizzle lines on top of the coated strawberry.
RIki
 

egoodell

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Considering we only have two rooms this is a little more than we need to do to run our place right now. I know we'll figure out portion control more when we get to 5 rooms.
My husband managed restaurants for 20 years and can do a lot of this in his head.
We don't substitute quality because of costs. We are not running a 100 seat restaurant, just two rooms and cheese plates for wine tours.
Since we do purchase a good amount some of the vendors give us a discount.
We will be pursuing this direction with the cheese I think since it is costly. I'm going to contact one of the online vendors to see if I can prepay for bulk and have it shipped in increments. That's a tip I got from a Chef at the Virginia Conference at the Homestead.
Plus I found a locally made nationally known hard goat cheese that I can buy in bulk that keeps for two months
Riki.
The reason I ask about costs, is because I have friends and other inns I work with, that when we sit down and really analyze the cost analysis of what they are serving, when we run the numbers and we find out they have figured costs wrong or just wung it, it can be hundreds of dollars worth of loss per month vs what they thought they were doing ok with.
Most innkeepers I know don't have restaurant backgrounds so its not something most people think about. Because so many places do the choc dipped strawberries to use that as an example, they don't adjust the price when the market varies, The general thing I hear is "it will all even out"
For a smaller place with only a couple of rooms its definetely not as much off an issue, but a 6 roomer or more can loose some serious money on breakfast. With the economy still the way it is, (and even if it was much better) I would think every penny would count.
.
Forfeng said:
Most innkeepers I know don't have restaurant backgrounds so its not something most people think about. Because so many places do the choc dipped strawberries to use that as an example, they don't adjust the price when the market varies, The general thing I hear is "it will all even out"
I have chocolate dipped strawberries as an "add on" for $12.
You are saying that I should charge more or less when the prices of strawberries change???
That would mean I'd have to change the price on the website, in my management system, etc.
We figure a price taking into considerations high and low and come up with an average, and compare it against what the others are charging.
There's something to be said for the value of my time, as well.
RIki
.
I agree, I am not saying you should or should not change the price, it was more was a generalized questions out of curiosity. Your time is very valuable as I well know and there never seems to be enough of it.
To answer the question about lower or higher on the price, never lower though, the extra profit is always good. But say strawberries go up and stay up for a long period of time, then it might be something worth the time to change.
I know many innkeepers take the time to raise their valentine's day price for packages and or add on bouquets because roses invariably double/triple in price around that time. If its only one or two orders of choc strawberries a week at the higher price it wouldn't be a big deal but if you are going through 12 orders a day and the cost is 3 bucks higher...... Whats your time worth vs cost of goods sold, would be my takeaway.
Sorry to question or raise the questions, I am always curious about the differences between restaurants and innkeeping and as a former chef used to nitpick costs to death. Thats why I ask, just to be a pain in the tuckus :)
.
Forfeng said:
To answer the question about lower or higher on the price, never lower though, the extra profit is always good. But say strawberries go up and stay up for a long period of time, then it might be something worth the time to change.
I know many innkeepers take the time to raise their valentine's day price for packages and or add on bouquets because roses invariably double/triple in price around that time. If its only one or two orders of choc strawberries a week at the higher price it wouldn't be a big deal but if you are going through 12 orders a day and the cost is 3 bucks higher...... Whats your time worth vs cost of goods sold, would be my takeaway.
Well, yes we know that if the price goes up and stays up to up prices.
I do NOT raise my rates for Valentines Day, Graduation Weekend or anything like that. I don't believe in that kind of thing, and I don't think the rest of the B&Bs in my town do etiher.. At the same time, I don't drop my prices when it's slower. I have a weekend rate which is $25 higher than my week rate.
RIki
 

Highlands John

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We are a B&B and I did a short while ago cost out our breakfasts.
The reason being that I wanted to add a smoked salmon dish to our breakfast menu but smoked salmon is very expensive, so I wanted to compare costs.
As it turned out the smoked salmon dish was only a matter of pence more expensive than a full Scottish cooked breakfast which most people choose, and yet most people think it's very luxurious to be offered this in a B&B and most B&B owners I know recoil at the thought of offering it to guests.
I can post my spreadsheet if anyone is interested.
 

Joey Camb

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We are lucky as we have a very good whole saler just 5 mins away from us and its good quality and value. Our butcher is 500 yards away and they even deliver if we want. We are considering joining a scheme where if you show you use 5 local products you become a member of Deliciously Yorkshire which does a lot of advertising on your behalf (ie you may pay a little more for locally sourced goods but you make it back on the advertising) So we are looking into using Rapeseed oil for our cooking which is produced locally as well as this would help us qualify. I did sit down and work out our costings per item but all our guests eat different things and in different quantities. However we try to keep it under $10 a head even if they had one of everything. We serve a full cooked breakfast, yougurts, fruit, creaeal, coffee, tea, speciality tea, toast, jellys, portions of Margarine, portions of butter and we cook any of the cooked things any way you like them. Ie some people would like two fried eggs and two pieces of bacon and that's all where as others eat a Full English or others just have toast and coffee. Plus we try and buy things that keep when they are on special. However the vegetables we buy every day as I am a fuss Pot about quality and freshness.
 

IronGate

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We are a B&B and I did a short while ago cost out our breakfasts.
The reason being that I wanted to add a smoked salmon dish to our breakfast menu but smoked salmon is very expensive, so I wanted to compare costs.
As it turned out the smoked salmon dish was only a matter of pence more expensive than a full Scottish cooked breakfast which most people choose, and yet most people think it's very luxurious to be offered this in a B&B and most B&B owners I know recoil at the thought of offering it to guests.
I can post my spreadsheet if anyone is interested..
Welcome, Pottery House!
Lovely place you have there. Do you find that a lot of people choose the salmon over the Scottish breakfast? There have been several comments around lately that the simpler, less gourmet menus seem to be striking peoples' fancies more these days.
 

IronGate

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We are a B&B and I did a short while ago cost out our breakfasts.
The reason being that I wanted to add a smoked salmon dish to our breakfast menu but smoked salmon is very expensive, so I wanted to compare costs.
As it turned out the smoked salmon dish was only a matter of pence more expensive than a full Scottish cooked breakfast which most people choose, and yet most people think it's very luxurious to be offered this in a B&B and most B&B owners I know recoil at the thought of offering it to guests.
I can post my spreadsheet if anyone is interested..
oops -- the double post gremlin strikes again!
 

IronGate

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Joined
Aug 9, 2008
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476
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We are a B&B and I did a short while ago cost out our breakfasts.
The reason being that I wanted to add a smoked salmon dish to our breakfast menu but smoked salmon is very expensive, so I wanted to compare costs.
As it turned out the smoked salmon dish was only a matter of pence more expensive than a full Scottish cooked breakfast which most people choose, and yet most people think it's very luxurious to be offered this in a B&B and most B&B owners I know recoil at the thought of offering it to guests.
I can post my spreadsheet if anyone is interested..
oops -- The enter key got stuck!
 
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