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JBloggs

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Is there something you offer or provide at your B&B with a specific use that guests may be unfamiliar with?
How do you handle this? Do you demonstrate for each new check-in or wait til they ask or look confused?
Example: Electric kettle. There are those who use them at home. Who have lived abroad and used them or are from overseas and use them. Then there are those who have no clue what it is, have never seen one before.
What about cups and saucers vs mugs? Is there something that is a standard at your B&B? ie you provide cups with saucers vs mugs?
Let's speak etiquette for a moment. Is there something you provide or a way you operate as an elegant B&B that is foreign to today's guests?
Example: From the Kitchen Sunday morning we hear someone blow their nose (trumpet sounding) at the dining table and DH said "NO WAY!" I said, YES, into the napkin. I could see him do it from where I was standing.
 

Morticia

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The whole tea and coffee set up is pretty novel to most guests. And we DO explain how to use the kettle & the coffee machine to every guest who pays attention. Can't help the ones who ignore us.
We've had the napkin-nose-blowers, too.
 

InnBloom

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Electric kettle! I figured it was pretty straightforward, so didn't explain it at first. After several people mysteriously left plain cups of water on the beverage tray, I shrugged and wondered. When someone finally said "The water is cold" I decided I had to explain that I don't pay to have water at the boil all day long, and you actually have to push the lever down to make the water boil! So I printed out a label on my label maker and taped it to the bottom of the machine! Little difference---most "got it', but clueless folks are clueless.
So now, in the middle of my get-acquainted tour, we visit the "beverage station" and I walk them through how the electric kettle will boil in just a few minutes but a) you have to make sure there is at least a mugful of water in it -- I show them the Brita filtered dispenser and the mugs -- and b) you actually have to push the button down and wait about 2 minutes.
Actually, I used to stress about keeping the kettle full for guests. But then a guest suggested that I'd save a lot of my electricity (and their time) if I just let them throw in the amount of water they want to boil. Eureka! (My beverage station doesn't have a water source.....therefore the Brita dispenser. It's a lot easier to keep that thing filled than to worry about keeping the kettle full.)
Funny thing is that those who already know about electric kettles (100% of overseas visitors and 15% of US visitors) look at me like I'm a wacko because I'm going into so much detail during my tour.
But it's not that huge of a deal and I do love my electric kettle. And lots of that US 15% think it's pretty nifty too and I imagine them going off and buying one and saying "We stayed at this fabulous B&B where you could boil your own water....!"
 

Breakfast Diva

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Its the Flavia machine. I have to demonstrate how to make both coffee and get hot water, even though there are directions. Even at that, people still can't work it sometimes! But still, I love my Flavia machine.
 

gillumhouse

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We have a warmer tank thingy. Plug that sucker in and it boils the water and - if DH would leave it plugged in - keeps the ware @ 195 degrees. I show my tea people how to put the mug under it, hit the unlock button, and then hold Dispense to get hot water for tea whenever. I threaten DH so he will NOT unplug it when guests are in-house. It has a 4 liter tank.
 

Highlands John

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Switching the power on for the guest rooms TVs at the wall, but I think we've covered that in a previous thread.
 

Joey Camb

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In the UK 95% of people have electric kettles do people mainly boil water on the hob in the US? my sister uses the hob but is considered excenric.?
 

Morticia

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In the UK 95% of people have electric kettles do people mainly boil water on the hob in the US? my sister uses the hob but is considered excenric.?.
camberleyhotelharrogate@yahoo.co.uk said:
In the UK 95% of people have electric kettles do people mainly boil water on the hob in the US? my sister uses the hob but is considered excenric.?
Microwave here. Most people don't even use a kettle of any kind. The number of electric kettles I could have sold here in 6 years would allow me to retire!
 

Morticia

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Heating and cooling options.. It never occurred to me that guests who were freezing wouldn't at least LOOK for something with temperature adjustments and then try it out. I think the one person who comes to mind was a late arrival and she was from an island where it doesn't get cold. She froze. She could have taken the blankets off the other bed, too, so I think she was also used to other people doing things for her.
Another was 2 couples of bikers who couldn't find the A/C unit in the window and complained of the heat in the room. 4 adults, no one knew what a window A/C looked like.
So, altho we had been doing the whole 'here's how you heat and cool' on the tour, we have to go touch the A/C unit and the thermostat now to be sure they really see them. Especially now when we're between seasons and it can be hot or cold.
 

JBloggs

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Bathrooms.
Again the zoned out from traveling scenario. If I don't specifically open the door and point at the toilet - they ask after me "But where is the bathroom!" Like I tricked them into a room with no loo.
 

Morticia

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Bathrooms.
Again the zoned out from traveling scenario. If I don't specifically open the door and point at the toilet - they ask after me "But where is the bathroom!" Like I tricked them into a room with no loo..
Everyone assumes the other door is the closet. We leave it slightly ajar AND it has a sign on it that says 'Bathroom'. And we get the same thing. One person was grousing over brekkie that there were 4 doors in the room, how was he supposed to tell at 2 AM which one was the bathroom door? Every bathroom has TWO nightlights, how about leaving one on and almost closing the door? You get the 'glow' of the light without being kept awake.
 

Proud Texan

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This is a timely topic. We are getting our first overseas visitors this weekend. The couple is from the UK, so having been there on three different trips, we are familiar with some of the differences in appliances, plumbing etc. We are purposely NOT bending over backwards to make things more "English". They are here to experience our culture and our foods, so we're going to roll out a special Texas welcome and make them feel at home Texas style.
We HATE HATE HATE it when we travel overseas and have to order from an "American" menu or have to put up with things that they think Americans want. I want to eat what the locals eat and experience their culture. I'm not spending thousands of dollars to get what I can get at home. I'm sure our foreign guests feel the same way.
 

EmptyNest

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This is a timely topic. We are getting our first overseas visitors this weekend. The couple is from the UK, so having been there on three different trips, we are familiar with some of the differences in appliances, plumbing etc. We are purposely NOT bending over backwards to make things more "English". They are here to experience our culture and our foods, so we're going to roll out a special Texas welcome and make them feel at home Texas style.
We HATE HATE HATE it when we travel overseas and have to order from an "American" menu or have to put up with things that they think Americans want. I want to eat what the locals eat and experience their culture. I'm not spending thousands of dollars to get what I can get at home. I'm sure our foreign guests feel the same way..
You are right! Why would they come to Texas if they didn't want a Texas experience.
 

Morticia

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This is a timely topic. We are getting our first overseas visitors this weekend. The couple is from the UK, so having been there on three different trips, we are familiar with some of the differences in appliances, plumbing etc. We are purposely NOT bending over backwards to make things more "English". They are here to experience our culture and our foods, so we're going to roll out a special Texas welcome and make them feel at home Texas style.
We HATE HATE HATE it when we travel overseas and have to order from an "American" menu or have to put up with things that they think Americans want. I want to eat what the locals eat and experience their culture. I'm not spending thousands of dollars to get what I can get at home. I'm sure our foreign guests feel the same way..
Proud Texan said:
I want to eat what the locals eat and experience their culture. I'm not spending thousands of dollars to get what I can get at home. I'm sure our foreign guests feel the same way.
Up to a point. MOST of our 'foreign' guests think the portions are out of control and they generally ask for smaller servings or 'just toast, please.' Now maybe we're getting them at the end of 2 weeks of supersized everything, but that's what we hear.
But, yes, we've not had food turned down because they 'don't like it' but because it's 'too much'. Then again, everyone the world over assumes Texas does everything big so you probably won't have any issues with portion size!
 

Proud Texan

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This is a timely topic. We are getting our first overseas visitors this weekend. The couple is from the UK, so having been there on three different trips, we are familiar with some of the differences in appliances, plumbing etc. We are purposely NOT bending over backwards to make things more "English". They are here to experience our culture and our foods, so we're going to roll out a special Texas welcome and make them feel at home Texas style.
We HATE HATE HATE it when we travel overseas and have to order from an "American" menu or have to put up with things that they think Americans want. I want to eat what the locals eat and experience their culture. I'm not spending thousands of dollars to get what I can get at home. I'm sure our foreign guests feel the same way..
Proud Texan said:
I want to eat what the locals eat and experience their culture. I'm not spending thousands of dollars to get what I can get at home. I'm sure our foreign guests feel the same way.
Up to a point. MOST of our 'foreign' guests think the portions are out of control and they generally ask for smaller servings or 'just toast, please.' Now maybe we're getting them at the end of 2 weeks of supersized everything, but that's what we hear.
But, yes, we've not had food turned down because they 'don't like it' but because it's 'too much'. Then again, everyone the world over assumes Texas does everything big so you probably won't have any issues with portion size!
.
Morticia said:
Proud Texan said:
I want to eat what the locals eat and experience their culture. I'm not spending thousands of dollars to get what I can get at home. I'm sure our foreign guests feel the same way.
Up to a point. MOST of our 'foreign' guests think the portions are out of control and they generally ask for smaller servings or 'just toast, please.' Now maybe we're getting them at the end of 2 weeks of supersized everything, but that's what we hear.
But, yes, we've not had food turned down because they 'don't like it' but because it's 'too much'. Then again, everyone the world over assumes Texas does everything big so you probably won't have any issues with portion size!
On our trip to Greece a few years ago, we heard that most of Europe considers Americans to be out of control with our portions and our eating. Unfortunately, they aren't wrong.
As someone suggested in another forum topic, you tell them to eat as much as the like and that they won't hurt anyone's feelings if anything is left on the plate.
 

Morticia

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This is a timely topic. We are getting our first overseas visitors this weekend. The couple is from the UK, so having been there on three different trips, we are familiar with some of the differences in appliances, plumbing etc. We are purposely NOT bending over backwards to make things more "English". They are here to experience our culture and our foods, so we're going to roll out a special Texas welcome and make them feel at home Texas style.
We HATE HATE HATE it when we travel overseas and have to order from an "American" menu or have to put up with things that they think Americans want. I want to eat what the locals eat and experience their culture. I'm not spending thousands of dollars to get what I can get at home. I'm sure our foreign guests feel the same way..
Proud Texan said:
I want to eat what the locals eat and experience their culture. I'm not spending thousands of dollars to get what I can get at home. I'm sure our foreign guests feel the same way.
Up to a point. MOST of our 'foreign' guests think the portions are out of control and they generally ask for smaller servings or 'just toast, please.' Now maybe we're getting them at the end of 2 weeks of supersized everything, but that's what we hear.
But, yes, we've not had food turned down because they 'don't like it' but because it's 'too much'. Then again, everyone the world over assumes Texas does everything big so you probably won't have any issues with portion size!
.
Morticia said:
Proud Texan said:
I want to eat what the locals eat and experience their culture. I'm not spending thousands of dollars to get what I can get at home. I'm sure our foreign guests feel the same way.
Up to a point. MOST of our 'foreign' guests think the portions are out of control and they generally ask for smaller servings or 'just toast, please.' Now maybe we're getting them at the end of 2 weeks of supersized everything, but that's what we hear.
But, yes, we've not had food turned down because they 'don't like it' but because it's 'too much'. Then again, everyone the world over assumes Texas does everything big so you probably won't have any issues with portion size!
On our trip to Greece a few years ago, we heard that most of Europe considers Americans to be out of control with our portions and our eating. Unfortunately, they aren't wrong.
As someone suggested in another forum topic, you tell them to eat as much as the like and that they won't hurt anyone's feelings if anything is left on the plate.
.
Proud Texan said:
As someone suggested in another forum topic, you tell them to eat as much as the like and that they won't hurt anyone's feelings if anything is left on the plate.
Here's something I didn't really realize until recently. We here are losing the 'older' generation who lived thru the Depression in the 1930's. So we have fewer people who think it's 'bad' to throw out food. BUT, England was still rationing in the 1950's. Many more people over there who remember doing without. It offends some of them to throw food out. Just my observation.
Only saying that if a guest asks for a smaller portion they get it. But my setup is different and I go thru hell with it at times as everyone is more than tired of hearing about! If I were a single-person operation with a single seating, darn tootin' there'd be no requests taken or given.
 

Proud Texan

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This is a timely topic. We are getting our first overseas visitors this weekend. The couple is from the UK, so having been there on three different trips, we are familiar with some of the differences in appliances, plumbing etc. We are purposely NOT bending over backwards to make things more "English". They are here to experience our culture and our foods, so we're going to roll out a special Texas welcome and make them feel at home Texas style.
We HATE HATE HATE it when we travel overseas and have to order from an "American" menu or have to put up with things that they think Americans want. I want to eat what the locals eat and experience their culture. I'm not spending thousands of dollars to get what I can get at home. I'm sure our foreign guests feel the same way..
Proud Texan said:
I want to eat what the locals eat and experience their culture. I'm not spending thousands of dollars to get what I can get at home. I'm sure our foreign guests feel the same way.
Up to a point. MOST of our 'foreign' guests think the portions are out of control and they generally ask for smaller servings or 'just toast, please.' Now maybe we're getting them at the end of 2 weeks of supersized everything, but that's what we hear.
But, yes, we've not had food turned down because they 'don't like it' but because it's 'too much'. Then again, everyone the world over assumes Texas does everything big so you probably won't have any issues with portion size!
.
Morticia said:
Proud Texan said:
I want to eat what the locals eat and experience their culture. I'm not spending thousands of dollars to get what I can get at home. I'm sure our foreign guests feel the same way.
Up to a point. MOST of our 'foreign' guests think the portions are out of control and they generally ask for smaller servings or 'just toast, please.' Now maybe we're getting them at the end of 2 weeks of supersized everything, but that's what we hear.
But, yes, we've not had food turned down because they 'don't like it' but because it's 'too much'. Then again, everyone the world over assumes Texas does everything big so you probably won't have any issues with portion size!
On our trip to Greece a few years ago, we heard that most of Europe considers Americans to be out of control with our portions and our eating. Unfortunately, they aren't wrong.
As someone suggested in another forum topic, you tell them to eat as much as the like and that they won't hurt anyone's feelings if anything is left on the plate.
.
Proud Texan said:
As someone suggested in another forum topic, you tell them to eat as much as the like and that they won't hurt anyone's feelings if anything is left on the plate.
Here's something I didn't really realize until recently. We here are losing the 'older' generation who lived thru the Depression in the 1930's. So we have fewer people who think it's 'bad' to throw out food. BUT, England was still rationing in the 1950's. Many more people over there who remember doing without. It offends some of them to throw food out. Just my observation.
Only saying that if a guest asks for a smaller portion they get it. But my setup is different and I go thru hell with it at times as everyone is more than tired of hearing about! If I were a single-person operation with a single seating, darn tootin' there'd be no requests taken or given.
.
Morticia said:
Proud Texan said:
As someone suggested in another forum topic, you tell them to eat as much as the like and that they won't hurt anyone's feelings if anything is left on the plate.
... It offends some of them to throw food out. Just my observation.
I don't think this true of anyone born after 1970. The globe is getting smaller all the time and our differences are rapidly disappearing as we evolve into one big homogenous cultural blob. It's a terrible loss. I know that when my grandkids finally get to travel Europe, it will be so Americanized that they'll ask "What's the big deal".
 

Arks

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This is a timely topic. We are getting our first overseas visitors this weekend. The couple is from the UK, so having been there on three different trips, we are familiar with some of the differences in appliances, plumbing etc. We are purposely NOT bending over backwards to make things more "English". They are here to experience our culture and our foods, so we're going to roll out a special Texas welcome and make them feel at home Texas style.
We HATE HATE HATE it when we travel overseas and have to order from an "American" menu or have to put up with things that they think Americans want. I want to eat what the locals eat and experience their culture. I'm not spending thousands of dollars to get what I can get at home. I'm sure our foreign guests feel the same way..
Proud Texan said:
The couple is from the UK, so having been there on three different trips, we are familiar with some of the differences...
Having been there then, you know that they'll have no problems with your breakfast. Folks from UK eat about what we do (except they may not be familiar with American-style breakfast sausage). Having spent a couple of weeks over there in June, I can tell you that the English are well on their way to catching up with us in size. I saw some huge Brits this trip. When I first visited England in 1978 I didn't see a single fat person. Those days are gone!
Proud Texan said:
We HATE HATE HATE it when we travel overseas and have to order from an "American" menu or have to put up with things that they think Americans want. I want to eat what the locals eat and experience their culture.
Me too, but I can tell you that after a couple of weeks in Scandinavia or Germany I do start longing for an egg and toast breakfast. I start to get tired of their breakfast of bread, lunch meat, and cheese. So, regarding foreign visitors, what they want may be a function of whether you're at the beginning of their trip here or later. After a few weeks here, someone from the UK might start to long for some pork 'n' beans and sautéed mushrooms with their breakfast!
Also, I've traveled through America with some Swedes (parents of exchange students we have hosted) and the men seemed fine with American breakfasts. But the women complained from day one. They wanted fruit, lunch meat, bread and cheese. We never could get them to eat an egg, bacon and toast.
 

Proud Texan

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This is a timely topic. We are getting our first overseas visitors this weekend. The couple is from the UK, so having been there on three different trips, we are familiar with some of the differences in appliances, plumbing etc. We are purposely NOT bending over backwards to make things more "English". They are here to experience our culture and our foods, so we're going to roll out a special Texas welcome and make them feel at home Texas style.
We HATE HATE HATE it when we travel overseas and have to order from an "American" menu or have to put up with things that they think Americans want. I want to eat what the locals eat and experience their culture. I'm not spending thousands of dollars to get what I can get at home. I'm sure our foreign guests feel the same way..
Proud Texan said:
The couple is from the UK, so having been there on three different trips, we are familiar with some of the differences...
Having been there then, you know that they'll have no problems with your breakfast. Folks from UK eat about what we do (except they may not be familiar with American-style breakfast sausage). Having spent a couple of weeks over there in June, I can tell you that the English are well on their way to catching up with us in size. I saw some huge Brits this trip. When I first visited England in 1978 I didn't see a single fat person. Those days are gone!
Proud Texan said:
We HATE HATE HATE it when we travel overseas and have to order from an "American" menu or have to put up with things that they think Americans want. I want to eat what the locals eat and experience their culture.
Me too, but I can tell you that after a couple of weeks in Scandinavia or Germany I do start longing for an egg and toast breakfast. I start to get tired of their breakfast of bread, lunch meat, and cheese. So, regarding foreign visitors, what they want may be a function of whether you're at the beginning of their trip here or later. After a few weeks here, someone from the UK might start to long for some pork 'n' beans and sautéed mushrooms with their breakfast!
Also, I've traveled through America with some Swedes (parents of exchange students we have hosted) and the men seemed fine with American breakfasts. But the women complained from day one. They wanted fruit, lunch meat, bread and cheese. We never could get them to eat an egg, bacon and toast.
.
Arkansawyer said:
Also, I've traveled through America with some Swedes (parents of exchange students we have hosted) and the men seemed fine with American breakfasts. But the women complained from day one. They wanted fruit, lunch meat, bread and cheese. We never could get them to eat an egg, bacon and toast.
I love a good English breakfast, beans, mushrooms and all. The funny thing is we spent a week in London (stayed in the Kennsington District) and it was several days before we met an Englishman. Most of the service people in the hotels were Indian, Croatian, Nigerian or anything but English. So, our English breakfast was never made by an English person.
It was much better in the English Countryside though.
 

Country Girl

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This is a timely topic. We are getting our first overseas visitors this weekend. The couple is from the UK, so having been there on three different trips, we are familiar with some of the differences in appliances, plumbing etc. We are purposely NOT bending over backwards to make things more "English". They are here to experience our culture and our foods, so we're going to roll out a special Texas welcome and make them feel at home Texas style.
We HATE HATE HATE it when we travel overseas and have to order from an "American" menu or have to put up with things that they think Americans want. I want to eat what the locals eat and experience their culture. I'm not spending thousands of dollars to get what I can get at home. I'm sure our foreign guests feel the same way..
Proud Texan said:
The couple is from the UK, so having been there on three different trips, we are familiar with some of the differences...
Having been there then, you know that they'll have no problems with your breakfast. Folks from UK eat about what we do (except they may not be familiar with American-style breakfast sausage). Having spent a couple of weeks over there in June, I can tell you that the English are well on their way to catching up with us in size. I saw some huge Brits this trip. When I first visited England in 1978 I didn't see a single fat person. Those days are gone!
Proud Texan said:
We HATE HATE HATE it when we travel overseas and have to order from an "American" menu or have to put up with things that they think Americans want. I want to eat what the locals eat and experience their culture.
Me too, but I can tell you that after a couple of weeks in Scandinavia or Germany I do start longing for an egg and toast breakfast. I start to get tired of their breakfast of bread, lunch meat, and cheese. So, regarding foreign visitors, what they want may be a function of whether you're at the beginning of their trip here or later. After a few weeks here, someone from the UK might start to long for some pork 'n' beans and sautéed mushrooms with their breakfast!
Also, I've traveled through America with some Swedes (parents of exchange students we have hosted) and the men seemed fine with American breakfasts. But the women complained from day one. They wanted fruit, lunch meat, bread and cheese. We never could get them to eat an egg, bacon and toast.
.
Arkansawyer said:
Also, I've traveled through America with some Swedes (parents of exchange students we have hosted) and the men seemed fine with American breakfasts. But the women complained from day one. They wanted fruit, lunch meat, bread and cheese. We never could get them to eat an egg, bacon and toast.
I love a good English breakfast, beans, mushrooms and all. The funny thing is we spent a week in London (stayed in the Kennsington District) and it was several days before we met an Englishman. Most of the service people in the hotels were Indian, Croatian, Nigerian or anything but English. So, our English breakfast was never made by an English person.
It was much better in the English Countryside though.
.
Proud Texan said:
Arkansawyer said:
Also, I've traveled through America with some Swedes (parents of exchange students we have hosted) and the men seemed fine with American breakfasts. But the women complained from day one. They wanted fruit, lunch meat, bread and cheese. We never could get them to eat an egg, bacon and toast.
I love a good English breakfast, beans, mushrooms and all. The funny thing is we spent a week in London (stayed in the Kennsington District) and it was several days before we met an Englishman. Most of the service people in the hotels were Indian, Croatian, Nigerian or anything but English. So, our English breakfast was never made by an English person.
It was much better in the English Countryside though.
We traveled throughout Ireland four years ago for 10 days. We only had 1 Irish waitress the entire time. All the rest were Russian or Italian.
 
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