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Help my marigolds are being decimated by slugs...Suggestions?

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The Farmers Daughter

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I have tried slug bait and cornmeal (they love it - it creates gas - they can't burp - they explode) however, they love the marigolds more. I hate to spray with pesticide, but what other options do I have? Obviously running around with a salt shaker is time consuming and impracticle, however it kills them instantly.
btw - does this forum have a spell check icon? If so where? If not....well, then it should.
 

Tim_Toad_HLB

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A shallow saucer or plastic container like salsa comes in filled with beer and buried in the soil right to the lip. They can't resist beer, crawl in and drown. If you're going to get some rain, prop the lid of the container up with a little twig or something so the beer doesn't get diluted.
Here is a website with lots of good info.
http://www.eartheasy.com/grow_nat_slug_cntrl.htm
 

gillumhouse

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The unintended chuckles caused by misspelled words are too much fun to spoil with spell check.
 

SweetiePie

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A shallow saucer or plastic container like salsa comes in filled with beer and buried in the soil right to the lip. They can't resist beer, crawl in and drown. If you're going to get some rain, prop the lid of the container up with a little twig or something so the beer doesn't get diluted.
Here is a website with lots of good info.
http://www.eartheasy.com/grow_nat_slug_cntrl.htm.
If that fails, drink the beer yourself. At least you'll feel better about the situation.
 

The Farmers Daughter

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A shallow saucer or plastic container like salsa comes in filled with beer and buried in the soil right to the lip. They can't resist beer, crawl in and drown. If you're going to get some rain, prop the lid of the container up with a little twig or something so the beer doesn't get diluted.
Here is a website with lots of good info.
http://www.eartheasy.com/grow_nat_slug_cntrl.htm.
If that fails, drink the beer yourself. At least you'll feel better about the situation.
.
Yes, I might resort to that. At this point in the frustration level, any beer drinking goin on here is gonna be by me.

 

EmptyNest

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Are you sure it is slugs? Try getting some crushed oyster shell / chicken grit...at the local garden / farm supply store. I sprinkle this in a circle around my hostas and not a slug gets near them.
 

swirt

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The Farmers Daughter said:
btw - does this forum have a spell check icon? If so where? If not....well, then it should.
There isn't one built into the forum. I recommend using one built into the browser (like the one built into Firefox or one built into the Google Toolbar) because they stay with you wherever you go.
 

JBloggs

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Beer. If that doesn't work try a flame thrower. They make a nice sizzle.
 

SweetiePie

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I have that same combination in my flower boxes on the deck. No slugs but I've found that the Zinnas look bad over time. They continue to bloom but the foliage seems to turn brown. Any suggestions?
 

Proud Texan

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Are you sure it is slugs? Try getting some crushed oyster shell / chicken grit...at the local garden / farm supply store. I sprinkle this in a circle around my hostas and not a slug gets near them..
catlady said:
Are you sure it is slugs? Try getting some crushed oyster shell / chicken grit...at the local garden / farm supply store. I sprinkle this in a circle around my hostas and not a slug gets near them.
Diatomaceous Earth, from either the garden supply or pool supply will also work.

 

DaisyMae

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well it seems as though earwigs (pincher bugs) are devouring my dahlias along the front walk. I don't see them so i don't know for sure but they come out at night according to the research i have done. always had beautiful dahlias at home but not since we moved to the inn.
 

Proud Texan

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The Texas heat is beginning to take it's toll on our landscaping already. Any turf that's not in the shade is stressed, even with constant watering and only the most hardy and drought tolerant plants haven't wilted. It's pretty sad.
 

The Farmers Daughter

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well it seems as though earwigs (pincher bugs) are devouring my dahlias along the front walk. I don't see them so i don't know for sure but they come out at night according to the research i have done. always had beautiful dahlias at home but not since we moved to the inn..
mollysmom said:
well it seems as though earwigs (pincher bugs) are devouring my dahlias along the front walk. I don't see them so i don't know for sure but they come out at night according to the research i have done. always had beautiful dahlias at home but not since we moved to the inn.
So thats the dahlia culprit? The buggers are here too. I hate to spray, but I don't see any other choices. Guests expect gardens with flowers.
 

GeorgiaGirl

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What about gnats in your kitchen??? I have had them for almost a week but have had no fruit out. Anyone have a remidy for those??
 

Proud Texan

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What about gnats in your kitchen??? I have had them for almost a week but have had no fruit out. Anyone have a remidy for those??.
GeorgiaGirl said:
What about gnats in your kitchen??? I have had them for almost a week but have had no fruit out. Anyone have a remidy for those??
[h1]FRUIT FLIES[/h1]
by Michael F. Potter, Extension Entomologist
University of Kentucky College of Agriculture
If you have been seeing small flies or gnats in your kitchen, they're probably fruit flies. Fruit flies can be a problem year round, but are especially common during late summer/fall because they are attracted to ripened or fermenting fruits and vegetables.
Tomatoes, melons, squash, grapes and other perishable items brought in from the garden are often the cause of an infestation developing indoors. Fruit flies are also attracted to rotting bananas, potatoes, onions and other unrefrigerated produce purchased at the grocery store. This fact sheet will explain how infestations originate and how they can be prevented in your home or place of business.
[h4]Biology and Behavior[/h4] Fruit flies are common in homes, restaurants, supermarkets and wherever else food is allowed to rot and ferment. Adults are about 1/8 inch long and usually have red eyes. The front portion of the body is tan and the rear portion is black. Fruit flies lay their eggs near the surface of fermenting foods or other moist, organic materials. Upon emerging, the tiny larvae continue to feed near the surface of the fermenting mass. This surface-feeding characteristic of the larvae is significant in that damaged or over-ripened portions of fruits and vegetables can be cut away without having to discard the remainder for fear of retaining any developing larvae. The reproductive potential of fruit flies is enormous; given the opportunity, they will lay about 500 eggs. The entire lifecycle from egg to adult can be completed in about a week.
Fruit flies are especially attracted to ripened fruits and vegetables in the kitchen. But they also will breed in drains, garbage disposals, empty bottles and cans, trash containers, mops and cleaning rags. All that is needed for development is a moist film of fermenting material. Infestations can originate from over-ripened fruits or vegetables that were previously infested and brought into the home. The adults can also fly in from outside through inadequately screened windows and doors.
Fruit flies are primarily nuisance pests. However, they also have the potential to contaminate food with bacteria and other disease-producing organisms.
[h4]Prevention[/h4] The best way to avoid problems with fruit flies is to eliminate sources of attraction. Produce which has ripened should be eaten, discarded or refrigerated. Cracked or damaged portions of fruits and vegetables should be cut away and discarded in the event that eggs or larvae are present in the wounded area. A single rotting potato or onion forgotten at the back of a closet, or fruit juice spillage under a refrigerator can breed thousands of fruit flies. So can a recycling bin stored in the basement which is never emptied or cleaned.
People who can their own fruits and vegetables, or make wine, cider or beer should ensure that the containers are well sealed; otherwise, fruit flies will lay their eggs under the lid and the tiny larvae will enter the container upon hatching. Windows and doors should be equipped with tight-fitting (16 mesh) screens to help prevent adult fruit flies from entering from outdoors.
[h4]Eradication[/h4] Once a structure is infested with fruit flies, all potential breeding areas must be located and eliminated. Unless the breeding sites are removed or cleaned, the problem will continue no matter how often insecticides are applied to control the adults. Finding the source(s) of attraction and breeding can be very challenging and often will require much thought and persistence. Potential breeding sites which are inaccessible (e.g., garbage disposals and drains) can be inspected by taping a clear plastic food storage bag over the opening overnight. If flies are breeding in these areas, the adults will emerge and be caught in the bag.
After the source of attraction and breeding is eliminated, a pyrethrum-based, aerosol insecticide may be used to kill any remaining adult flies in the area.

A better approach, however, is to construct a trap by placing a paper funnel (rolled from a sheet of notebook paper) into a jar which is then baited with a few ounces of cider vinegar. Place the jar trap(s) wherever fruit flies are seen. This simple but effective trap will soon catch any remaining adult flies which can then be killed or released outdoors.
Revised: 1/94
CAUTION! Pesticide recommendations in this publication are registered for use in Kentucky, USA ONLY! The use of some products may not be legal in your state or country. Please check with your local county agent or regulatory official before using any pesticide mentioned in this publication.
Of course, ALWAYS READ AND FOLLOW LABEL DIRECTIONS FOR SAFE USE OF ANY PESTICIDE!
Source: http://www.ca.uky.edu/entomology/entfacts/ef621.asp
 

gillumhouse

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What about gnats in your kitchen??? I have had them for almost a week but have had no fruit out. Anyone have a remidy for those??.
Put a small dish or cup with a bit of cider vinegar and add a drop or 2 of dish washing liquid in it and put it near the area these little flies are congregating. The vinegar attracts them and the liquid detergent keeps them from flying away. This works beautifully and it is not poison.
 

GeorgiaGirl

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THANK YOU GUYS! I'm going to do the Cider Vinegar w/ dishwashing liquid. I've killed a few today so there's not too many left, but even just one can drive you crazy!
 

swirt

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THANK YOU GUYS! I'm going to do the Cider Vinegar w/ dishwashing liquid. I've killed a few today so there's not too many left, but even just one can drive you crazy!.
If you don't have any cider vinegar, a dash of red wine works too. :)
 
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