Hotel Hell

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Miss O'Hara

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I sometimes get sucked into browsing imdb.com and noticed that Gordon Ramsey's new reality show is Hotel Hell.
"After more than a decade of running restaurants in some of the world's top hotels, Gordon Ramsay knows firsthand the crucial importance of surpassing guests' highest expectations. In new series Ramsay will travel across the country to fix horrid hotels, awful inns and just plain bad bed and breakfasts. To come to grips with the problems, Ramsay will endure hotels at their worst, from filthy bedrooms and mold-ridden bathrooms to dreadful room service and incompetent staff, all so you don't have to. After he has uncovered the issues, Ramsay will put the hotel owners and employees to work as he attempts to turn around these failing establishments. With reputations on the line, one thing is certain: if they can't meet Ramsay's high standards, they will never check out of Hotel Hell."
Could be interesting.
 

Joey Camb

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cos the hotel inspector isn't doing this already? mind you is there going to be a new series? if not this will fill the gap.
 

toddburme

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I would like to see it. Most of these shows are about a remodel and cleaning but hopefully there is some real info along the way.
 

Highlands John

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cos the hotel inspector isn't doing this already? mind you is there going to be a new series? if not this will fill the gap..
camberleyhotelharrogate@yahoo.co.uk said:
cos the hotel inspector isn't doing this already? mind you is there going to be a new series? if not this will fill the gap.
Alex Polizzi is off doing The Fixer for the BBC lately, so maybe she's said no to more Hotel Inspector. Hope not.
 

Joey Camb

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See I liked her! mind you with the way Gordon behaves it will probably make better television! trouble is they seem to be finding it harder and harder to get people to participate wonder why that would be? LOL
mind you my mate bev who has a place near me recons we should go on me, her and another friend who has a B&B and go stay at each other's places it would be a riot. Mind I don't think they would go for it!
 

Breakfast Diva

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I saw an ad for this on tv. He had a black light....I don't know how many places could actually pass a black light inspection! Of course we will always do better than a hotel, but unless you clean with a black light, things will be missed because you can't see them.
 

Samster

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He's been pretty good entertainment on the restaurant shows. It will probably get a following.
 

Generic

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It always surprises me at who chooses to be on these shows that show the worst of a business in hopes of improvement. And reading reviews of some of the restaurants that he has "fixed" seems to show that they aren't "fixed" most of the time because the fixes are superficial and the owners are often donkeys.
This can be done well for TV in a non-explotive manner, but who will watch it? It's much more sensationalistic to show cobwebs, dirty toilets and the such than it is to focus on the fact that they might be missing their mark with their breakfast (serving ham but many Muslims visiting) or not having the right size beds (people seeking Queen or King and not Doubles.)
 

Joey Camb

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It always surprises me at who chooses to be on these shows that show the worst of a business in hopes of improvement. And reading reviews of some of the restaurants that he has "fixed" seems to show that they aren't "fixed" most of the time because the fixes are superficial and the owners are often donkeys.
This can be done well for TV in a non-explotive manner, but who will watch it? It's much more sensationalistic to show cobwebs, dirty toilets and the such than it is to focus on the fact that they might be missing their mark with their breakfast (serving ham but many Muslims visiting) or not having the right size beds (people seeking Queen or King and not Doubles.).
What makes me loopy is the complete lack of common sense - ie woman with 4 bedrooms and 3 members of staff? - chap who had electrical appliances held together with tape which when was pointed out to him said it was fine! couple with 8 rooms and 2 full time chamber maids and struggling financially and so on. Also what confuses me the most is you volunteer for these shows!!!! so why not take the fricking advice! thats the purpose of the exercise! its like one chap was doing single occupancy for half the price of double - got that stopped right away! it doesn't cost you half as much to have one person as two!!!! and so on!
 

Madeleine

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It always surprises me at who chooses to be on these shows that show the worst of a business in hopes of improvement. And reading reviews of some of the restaurants that he has "fixed" seems to show that they aren't "fixed" most of the time because the fixes are superficial and the owners are often donkeys.
This can be done well for TV in a non-explotive manner, but who will watch it? It's much more sensationalistic to show cobwebs, dirty toilets and the such than it is to focus on the fact that they might be missing their mark with their breakfast (serving ham but many Muslims visiting) or not having the right size beds (people seeking Queen or King and not Doubles.).
Sometimes it takes a real outside source to focus someone's attention on their failings. You know we beat our heads on the keyboards when the same person asks the same question over and over and never take the advice offered. Maybe seeing themselves on TV smacks some sense into them.
Altho, the follow up comments on the restaurant show do seem to indicate that the owners 'slip' after a few months. What that means is they need a follow up visit and some reinforcement of the initial euphoria. Maybe they got so busy they couldn't keep up the pace. Maybe they were failing because they really don't want to be busy. Could be a lot of things.
Definitely not something I would sign up for. My skin isn't thick enough.
 

Generic

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It always surprises me at who chooses to be on these shows that show the worst of a business in hopes of improvement. And reading reviews of some of the restaurants that he has "fixed" seems to show that they aren't "fixed" most of the time because the fixes are superficial and the owners are often donkeys.
This can be done well for TV in a non-explotive manner, but who will watch it? It's much more sensationalistic to show cobwebs, dirty toilets and the such than it is to focus on the fact that they might be missing their mark with their breakfast (serving ham but many Muslims visiting) or not having the right size beds (people seeking Queen or King and not Doubles.).
Sometimes it takes a real outside source to focus someone's attention on their failings. You know we beat our heads on the keyboards when the same person asks the same question over and over and never take the advice offered. Maybe seeing themselves on TV smacks some sense into them.
Altho, the follow up comments on the restaurant show do seem to indicate that the owners 'slip' after a few months. What that means is they need a follow up visit and some reinforcement of the initial euphoria. Maybe they got so busy they couldn't keep up the pace. Maybe they were failing because they really don't want to be busy. Could be a lot of things.
Definitely not something I would sign up for. My skin isn't thick enough.
.
There was a show here that did the makeover part and the food part of the equation, didn't bother with the interpersonal part or the financials at all. The end result was that the show was called a "curse".
The reality is that it's composed of so many factors and you have to look into them ALL and not just gloss over by redoing a room and fixing the menu. Often that leaves them without the other tools.
Ramsay's original, in the UK was far superior in that they did look at all the factors. And remember, Ramsay himself has had a string of failures as well, he's not alway been the golden touch.
Want to see the hit list? It's at http://www.quora.com/What-restaurants-on-Kitchen-Nightmares-have-closed
 

Madeleine

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It always surprises me at who chooses to be on these shows that show the worst of a business in hopes of improvement. And reading reviews of some of the restaurants that he has "fixed" seems to show that they aren't "fixed" most of the time because the fixes are superficial and the owners are often donkeys.
This can be done well for TV in a non-explotive manner, but who will watch it? It's much more sensationalistic to show cobwebs, dirty toilets and the such than it is to focus on the fact that they might be missing their mark with their breakfast (serving ham but many Muslims visiting) or not having the right size beds (people seeking Queen or King and not Doubles.).
Sometimes it takes a real outside source to focus someone's attention on their failings. You know we beat our heads on the keyboards when the same person asks the same question over and over and never take the advice offered. Maybe seeing themselves on TV smacks some sense into them.
Altho, the follow up comments on the restaurant show do seem to indicate that the owners 'slip' after a few months. What that means is they need a follow up visit and some reinforcement of the initial euphoria. Maybe they got so busy they couldn't keep up the pace. Maybe they were failing because they really don't want to be busy. Could be a lot of things.
Definitely not something I would sign up for. My skin isn't thick enough.
.
There was a show here that did the makeover part and the food part of the equation, didn't bother with the interpersonal part or the financials at all. The end result was that the show was called a "curse".
The reality is that it's composed of so many factors and you have to look into them ALL and not just gloss over by redoing a room and fixing the menu. Often that leaves them without the other tools.
Ramsay's original, in the UK was far superior in that they did look at all the factors. And remember, Ramsay himself has had a string of failures as well, he's not alway been the golden touch.
Want to see the hit list? It's at http://www.quora.com/What-restaurants-on-Kitchen-Nightmares-have-closed
.
Wow. That's a long list of fails even after getting help. Your point about just doing the surficial stuff is true. Without getting at the heart of the problem success is hard to come by.
 

Arks

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It always surprises me at who chooses to be on these shows that show the worst of a business in hopes of improvement. And reading reviews of some of the restaurants that he has "fixed" seems to show that they aren't "fixed" most of the time because the fixes are superficial and the owners are often donkeys.
This can be done well for TV in a non-explotive manner, but who will watch it? It's much more sensationalistic to show cobwebs, dirty toilets and the such than it is to focus on the fact that they might be missing their mark with their breakfast (serving ham but many Muslims visiting) or not having the right size beds (people seeking Queen or King and not Doubles.).
Sometimes it takes a real outside source to focus someone's attention on their failings. You know we beat our heads on the keyboards when the same person asks the same question over and over and never take the advice offered. Maybe seeing themselves on TV smacks some sense into them.
Altho, the follow up comments on the restaurant show do seem to indicate that the owners 'slip' after a few months. What that means is they need a follow up visit and some reinforcement of the initial euphoria. Maybe they got so busy they couldn't keep up the pace. Maybe they were failing because they really don't want to be busy. Could be a lot of things.
Definitely not something I would sign up for. My skin isn't thick enough.
.
There was a show here that did the makeover part and the food part of the equation, didn't bother with the interpersonal part or the financials at all. The end result was that the show was called a "curse".
The reality is that it's composed of so many factors and you have to look into them ALL and not just gloss over by redoing a room and fixing the menu. Often that leaves them without the other tools.
Ramsay's original, in the UK was far superior in that they did look at all the factors. And remember, Ramsay himself has had a string of failures as well, he's not alway been the golden touch.
Want to see the hit list? It's at http://www.quora.com/What-restaurants-on-Kitchen-Nightmares-have-closed
.
Wow. That's a long list of fails even after getting help. Your point about just doing the surficial stuff is true. Without getting at the heart of the problem success is hard to come by.
.
Madeleine said:
Wow. That's a long list of fails even after getting help. Your point about just doing the surficial stuff is true. Without getting at the heart of the problem success is hard to come by.
I'm sure a lot of the closure problem is that people (the management) are a lot harder to change than decor and the menu!
 

Madeleine

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It always surprises me at who chooses to be on these shows that show the worst of a business in hopes of improvement. And reading reviews of some of the restaurants that he has "fixed" seems to show that they aren't "fixed" most of the time because the fixes are superficial and the owners are often donkeys.
This can be done well for TV in a non-explotive manner, but who will watch it? It's much more sensationalistic to show cobwebs, dirty toilets and the such than it is to focus on the fact that they might be missing their mark with their breakfast (serving ham but many Muslims visiting) or not having the right size beds (people seeking Queen or King and not Doubles.).
Sometimes it takes a real outside source to focus someone's attention on their failings. You know we beat our heads on the keyboards when the same person asks the same question over and over and never take the advice offered. Maybe seeing themselves on TV smacks some sense into them.
Altho, the follow up comments on the restaurant show do seem to indicate that the owners 'slip' after a few months. What that means is they need a follow up visit and some reinforcement of the initial euphoria. Maybe they got so busy they couldn't keep up the pace. Maybe they were failing because they really don't want to be busy. Could be a lot of things.
Definitely not something I would sign up for. My skin isn't thick enough.
.
There was a show here that did the makeover part and the food part of the equation, didn't bother with the interpersonal part or the financials at all. The end result was that the show was called a "curse".
The reality is that it's composed of so many factors and you have to look into them ALL and not just gloss over by redoing a room and fixing the menu. Often that leaves them without the other tools.
Ramsay's original, in the UK was far superior in that they did look at all the factors. And remember, Ramsay himself has had a string of failures as well, he's not alway been the golden touch.
Want to see the hit list? It's at http://www.quora.com/What-restaurants-on-Kitchen-Nightmares-have-closed
.
Wow. That's a long list of fails even after getting help. Your point about just doing the surficial stuff is true. Without getting at the heart of the problem success is hard to come by.
.
Madeleine said:
Wow. That's a long list of fails even after getting help. Your point about just doing the surficial stuff is true. Without getting at the heart of the problem success is hard to come by.
I'm sure a lot of the closure problem is that people (the management) are a lot harder to change than decor and the menu!
.
Arkansawyer said:
Madeleine said:
Wow. That's a long list of fails even after getting help. Your point about just doing the surficial stuff is true. Without getting at the heart of the problem success is hard to come by.
I'm sure a lot of the closure problem is that people (the management) are a lot harder to change than decor and the menu!
A little perspective on that. Our place was a fully operational biz when we bought it but all the maintenance had been let go for 4+ years. The PO's were just collecting money. The place needed updating (and still does, in some areas) and each time we have made a change, I have felt a little lighter on my feet, a little happier to go to work each day.
So, making those surficial changes can make a big difference in how the owner feels. But, if they've lost the drive, it's not going to help and may make them feel worse.
I still have a 10 page wish list of things I would change if we had the money.
 

JBloggs

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It always surprises me at who chooses to be on these shows that show the worst of a business in hopes of improvement. And reading reviews of some of the restaurants that he has "fixed" seems to show that they aren't "fixed" most of the time because the fixes are superficial and the owners are often donkeys.
This can be done well for TV in a non-explotive manner, but who will watch it? It's much more sensationalistic to show cobwebs, dirty toilets and the such than it is to focus on the fact that they might be missing their mark with their breakfast (serving ham but many Muslims visiting) or not having the right size beds (people seeking Queen or King and not Doubles.).
Sometimes it takes a real outside source to focus someone's attention on their failings. You know we beat our heads on the keyboards when the same person asks the same question over and over and never take the advice offered. Maybe seeing themselves on TV smacks some sense into them.
Altho, the follow up comments on the restaurant show do seem to indicate that the owners 'slip' after a few months. What that means is they need a follow up visit and some reinforcement of the initial euphoria. Maybe they got so busy they couldn't keep up the pace. Maybe they were failing because they really don't want to be busy. Could be a lot of things.
Definitely not something I would sign up for. My skin isn't thick enough.
.
There was a show here that did the makeover part and the food part of the equation, didn't bother with the interpersonal part or the financials at all. The end result was that the show was called a "curse".
The reality is that it's composed of so many factors and you have to look into them ALL and not just gloss over by redoing a room and fixing the menu. Often that leaves them without the other tools.
Ramsay's original, in the UK was far superior in that they did look at all the factors. And remember, Ramsay himself has had a string of failures as well, he's not alway been the golden touch.
Want to see the hit list? It's at http://www.quora.com/What-restaurants-on-Kitchen-Nightmares-have-closed
.
Wow. That's a long list of fails even after getting help. Your point about just doing the surficial stuff is true. Without getting at the heart of the problem success is hard to come by.
.
Madeleine said:
Wow. That's a long list of fails even after getting help. Your point about just doing the surficial stuff is true. Without getting at the heart of the problem success is hard to come by.
I'm sure a lot of the closure problem is that people (the management) are a lot harder to change than decor and the menu!
.
Arkansawyer said:
Madeleine said:
Wow. That's a long list of fails even after getting help. Your point about just doing the surficial stuff is true. Without getting at the heart of the problem success is hard to come by.
I'm sure a lot of the closure problem is that people (the management) are a lot harder to change than decor and the menu!
A little perspective on that. Our place was a fully operational biz when we bought it but all the maintenance had been let go for 4+ years. The PO's were just collecting money. The place needed updating (and still does, in some areas) and each time we have made a change, I have felt a little lighter on my feet, a little happier to go to work each day.
So, making those surficial changes can make a big difference in how the owner feels. But, if they've lost the drive, it's not going to help and may make them feel worse.
I still have a 10 page wish list of things I would change if we had the money.
.
Madeleine said:
Arkansawyer said:
Madeleine said:
Wow. That's a long list of fails even after getting help. Your point about just doing the surficial stuff is true. Without getting at the heart of the problem success is hard to come by.
I'm sure a lot of the closure problem is that people (the management) are a lot harder to change than decor and the menu!
A little perspective on that. Our place was a fully operational biz when we bought it but all the maintenance had been let go for 4+ years. The PO's were just collecting money. The place needed updating (and still does, in some areas) and each time we have made a change, I have felt a little lighter on my feet, a little happier to go to work each day.
So, making those surficial changes can make a big difference in how the owner feels. But, if they've lost the drive, it's not going to help and may make them feel worse.
I still have a 10 page wish list of things I would change if we had the money.
Ye old deferred maintenance routine.
One thing asked for on all the for sale sites is "date of last renovation"
Admittedly it is hard to pour every cent you make back into it, but if you want it to sell it gots-ta-look-great! It is just one thing after another here...always maintening.
 

Madeleine

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It always surprises me at who chooses to be on these shows that show the worst of a business in hopes of improvement. And reading reviews of some of the restaurants that he has "fixed" seems to show that they aren't "fixed" most of the time because the fixes are superficial and the owners are often donkeys.
This can be done well for TV in a non-explotive manner, but who will watch it? It's much more sensationalistic to show cobwebs, dirty toilets and the such than it is to focus on the fact that they might be missing their mark with their breakfast (serving ham but many Muslims visiting) or not having the right size beds (people seeking Queen or King and not Doubles.).
Sometimes it takes a real outside source to focus someone's attention on their failings. You know we beat our heads on the keyboards when the same person asks the same question over and over and never take the advice offered. Maybe seeing themselves on TV smacks some sense into them.
Altho, the follow up comments on the restaurant show do seem to indicate that the owners 'slip' after a few months. What that means is they need a follow up visit and some reinforcement of the initial euphoria. Maybe they got so busy they couldn't keep up the pace. Maybe they were failing because they really don't want to be busy. Could be a lot of things.
Definitely not something I would sign up for. My skin isn't thick enough.
.
There was a show here that did the makeover part and the food part of the equation, didn't bother with the interpersonal part or the financials at all. The end result was that the show was called a "curse".
The reality is that it's composed of so many factors and you have to look into them ALL and not just gloss over by redoing a room and fixing the menu. Often that leaves them without the other tools.
Ramsay's original, in the UK was far superior in that they did look at all the factors. And remember, Ramsay himself has had a string of failures as well, he's not alway been the golden touch.
Want to see the hit list? It's at http://www.quora.com/What-restaurants-on-Kitchen-Nightmares-have-closed
.
Wow. That's a long list of fails even after getting help. Your point about just doing the surficial stuff is true. Without getting at the heart of the problem success is hard to come by.
.
Madeleine said:
Wow. That's a long list of fails even after getting help. Your point about just doing the surficial stuff is true. Without getting at the heart of the problem success is hard to come by.
I'm sure a lot of the closure problem is that people (the management) are a lot harder to change than decor and the menu!
.
Arkansawyer said:
Madeleine said:
Wow. That's a long list of fails even after getting help. Your point about just doing the surficial stuff is true. Without getting at the heart of the problem success is hard to come by.
I'm sure a lot of the closure problem is that people (the management) are a lot harder to change than decor and the menu!
A little perspective on that. Our place was a fully operational biz when we bought it but all the maintenance had been let go for 4+ years. The PO's were just collecting money. The place needed updating (and still does, in some areas) and each time we have made a change, I have felt a little lighter on my feet, a little happier to go to work each day.
So, making those surficial changes can make a big difference in how the owner feels. But, if they've lost the drive, it's not going to help and may make them feel worse.
I still have a 10 page wish list of things I would change if we had the money.
.
Madeleine said:
Arkansawyer said:
Madeleine said:
Wow. That's a long list of fails even after getting help. Your point about just doing the surficial stuff is true. Without getting at the heart of the problem success is hard to come by.
I'm sure a lot of the closure problem is that people (the management) are a lot harder to change than decor and the menu!
A little perspective on that. Our place was a fully operational biz when we bought it but all the maintenance had been let go for 4+ years. The PO's were just collecting money. The place needed updating (and still does, in some areas) and each time we have made a change, I have felt a little lighter on my feet, a little happier to go to work each day.
So, making those surficial changes can make a big difference in how the owner feels. But, if they've lost the drive, it's not going to help and may make them feel worse.
I still have a 10 page wish list of things I would change if we had the money.
Ye old deferred maintenance routine.
One thing asked for on all the for sale sites is "date of last renovation"
Admittedly it is hard to pour every cent you make back into it, but if you want it to sell it gots-ta-look-great! It is just one thing after another here...always maintening.
.
Joey Bloggs said:
Ye old deferred maintenance routine.
One thing asked for on all the for sale sites is "date of last renovation"
Admittedly it is hard to pour every cent you make back into it, but if you want it to sell it gots-ta-look-great! It is just one thing after another here...always maintening.
You know the story...the PO's 'improvements' list looked like this: added new pictures in living room, bought 2 lawn chairs, blah, blah, blah.
Whereas the improvements list we hand over (if we ever hand over!) will have a new roof, new furnace, new kitchen, renovated owners' qtrs, exterior painted, new doors, resurfaced driveway, new beds, new flooring, new bathroom tile, blah, blah, blah.
 

Generic

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It always surprises me at who chooses to be on these shows that show the worst of a business in hopes of improvement. And reading reviews of some of the restaurants that he has "fixed" seems to show that they aren't "fixed" most of the time because the fixes are superficial and the owners are often donkeys.
This can be done well for TV in a non-explotive manner, but who will watch it? It's much more sensationalistic to show cobwebs, dirty toilets and the such than it is to focus on the fact that they might be missing their mark with their breakfast (serving ham but many Muslims visiting) or not having the right size beds (people seeking Queen or King and not Doubles.).
Sometimes it takes a real outside source to focus someone's attention on their failings. You know we beat our heads on the keyboards when the same person asks the same question over and over and never take the advice offered. Maybe seeing themselves on TV smacks some sense into them.
Altho, the follow up comments on the restaurant show do seem to indicate that the owners 'slip' after a few months. What that means is they need a follow up visit and some reinforcement of the initial euphoria. Maybe they got so busy they couldn't keep up the pace. Maybe they were failing because they really don't want to be busy. Could be a lot of things.
Definitely not something I would sign up for. My skin isn't thick enough.
.
There was a show here that did the makeover part and the food part of the equation, didn't bother with the interpersonal part or the financials at all. The end result was that the show was called a "curse".
The reality is that it's composed of so many factors and you have to look into them ALL and not just gloss over by redoing a room and fixing the menu. Often that leaves them without the other tools.
Ramsay's original, in the UK was far superior in that they did look at all the factors. And remember, Ramsay himself has had a string of failures as well, he's not alway been the golden touch.
Want to see the hit list? It's at http://www.quora.com/What-restaurants-on-Kitchen-Nightmares-have-closed
.
Wow. That's a long list of fails even after getting help. Your point about just doing the surficial stuff is true. Without getting at the heart of the problem success is hard to come by.
.
Madeleine said:
Wow. That's a long list of fails even after getting help. Your point about just doing the surficial stuff is true. Without getting at the heart of the problem success is hard to come by.
I'm sure a lot of the closure problem is that people (the management) are a lot harder to change than decor and the menu!
.
Arkansawyer said:
Madeleine said:
Wow. That's a long list of fails even after getting help. Your point about just doing the surficial stuff is true. Without getting at the heart of the problem success is hard to come by.
I'm sure a lot of the closure problem is that people (the management) are a lot harder to change than decor and the menu!
A little perspective on that. Our place was a fully operational biz when we bought it but all the maintenance had been let go for 4+ years. The PO's were just collecting money. The place needed updating (and still does, in some areas) and each time we have made a change, I have felt a little lighter on my feet, a little happier to go to work each day.
So, making those surficial changes can make a big difference in how the owner feels. But, if they've lost the drive, it's not going to help and may make them feel worse.
I still have a 10 page wish list of things I would change if we had the money.
.
Madeleine said:
Arkansawyer said:
Madeleine said:
Wow. That's a long list of fails even after getting help. Your point about just doing the surficial stuff is true. Without getting at the heart of the problem success is hard to come by.
I'm sure a lot of the closure problem is that people (the management) are a lot harder to change than decor and the menu!
A little perspective on that. Our place was a fully operational biz when we bought it but all the maintenance had been let go for 4+ years. The PO's were just collecting money. The place needed updating (and still does, in some areas) and each time we have made a change, I have felt a little lighter on my feet, a little happier to go to work each day.
So, making those surficial changes can make a big difference in how the owner feels. But, if they've lost the drive, it's not going to help and may make them feel worse.
I still have a 10 page wish list of things I would change if we had the money.
Ye old deferred maintenance routine.
One thing asked for on all the for sale sites is "date of last renovation"
Admittedly it is hard to pour every cent you make back into it, but if you want it to sell it gots-ta-look-great! It is just one thing after another here...always maintening.
.
I was just reading an article about the fact that every single guest that you have essentially depreciates the accomodations and that's just part and parcel of the business. I don't know how often a repaint parts of the walls to cover over the marks left from guests and their luggage. I assume that everything in the house has a lifespan and that I can only use a towel for so long. (I don't think I have a towel in the house that is over a year old.) And when I get a few extra washings out of a set of sheets it's all cream around here.
If you don't do maintenance, if you don't update, if you don't change things all the time, something is up. And one of the most important parts of selling is to keep everything in tip top shape, if you don't, the people deduct the cost of renovations in their mind as they go through your property.
 

JBloggs

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It always surprises me at who chooses to be on these shows that show the worst of a business in hopes of improvement. And reading reviews of some of the restaurants that he has "fixed" seems to show that they aren't "fixed" most of the time because the fixes are superficial and the owners are often donkeys.
This can be done well for TV in a non-explotive manner, but who will watch it? It's much more sensationalistic to show cobwebs, dirty toilets and the such than it is to focus on the fact that they might be missing their mark with their breakfast (serving ham but many Muslims visiting) or not having the right size beds (people seeking Queen or King and not Doubles.).
Sometimes it takes a real outside source to focus someone's attention on their failings. You know we beat our heads on the keyboards when the same person asks the same question over and over and never take the advice offered. Maybe seeing themselves on TV smacks some sense into them.
Altho, the follow up comments on the restaurant show do seem to indicate that the owners 'slip' after a few months. What that means is they need a follow up visit and some reinforcement of the initial euphoria. Maybe they got so busy they couldn't keep up the pace. Maybe they were failing because they really don't want to be busy. Could be a lot of things.
Definitely not something I would sign up for. My skin isn't thick enough.
.
There was a show here that did the makeover part and the food part of the equation, didn't bother with the interpersonal part or the financials at all. The end result was that the show was called a "curse".
The reality is that it's composed of so many factors and you have to look into them ALL and not just gloss over by redoing a room and fixing the menu. Often that leaves them without the other tools.
Ramsay's original, in the UK was far superior in that they did look at all the factors. And remember, Ramsay himself has had a string of failures as well, he's not alway been the golden touch.
Want to see the hit list? It's at http://www.quora.com/What-restaurants-on-Kitchen-Nightmares-have-closed
.
Wow. That's a long list of fails even after getting help. Your point about just doing the surficial stuff is true. Without getting at the heart of the problem success is hard to come by.
.
Madeleine said:
Wow. That's a long list of fails even after getting help. Your point about just doing the surficial stuff is true. Without getting at the heart of the problem success is hard to come by.
I'm sure a lot of the closure problem is that people (the management) are a lot harder to change than decor and the menu!
.
Arkansawyer said:
Madeleine said:
Wow. That's a long list of fails even after getting help. Your point about just doing the surficial stuff is true. Without getting at the heart of the problem success is hard to come by.
I'm sure a lot of the closure problem is that people (the management) are a lot harder to change than decor and the menu!
A little perspective on that. Our place was a fully operational biz when we bought it but all the maintenance had been let go for 4+ years. The PO's were just collecting money. The place needed updating (and still does, in some areas) and each time we have made a change, I have felt a little lighter on my feet, a little happier to go to work each day.
So, making those surficial changes can make a big difference in how the owner feels. But, if they've lost the drive, it's not going to help and may make them feel worse.
I still have a 10 page wish list of things I would change if we had the money.
.
Madeleine said:
Arkansawyer said:
Madeleine said:
Wow. That's a long list of fails even after getting help. Your point about just doing the surficial stuff is true. Without getting at the heart of the problem success is hard to come by.
I'm sure a lot of the closure problem is that people (the management) are a lot harder to change than decor and the menu!
A little perspective on that. Our place was a fully operational biz when we bought it but all the maintenance had been let go for 4+ years. The PO's were just collecting money. The place needed updating (and still does, in some areas) and each time we have made a change, I have felt a little lighter on my feet, a little happier to go to work each day.
So, making those surficial changes can make a big difference in how the owner feels. But, if they've lost the drive, it's not going to help and may make them feel worse.
I still have a 10 page wish list of things I would change if we had the money.
Ye old deferred maintenance routine.
One thing asked for on all the for sale sites is "date of last renovation"
Admittedly it is hard to pour every cent you make back into it, but if you want it to sell it gots-ta-look-great! It is just one thing after another here...always maintening.
.
Joey Bloggs said:
Ye old deferred maintenance routine.
One thing asked for on all the for sale sites is "date of last renovation"
Admittedly it is hard to pour every cent you make back into it, but if you want it to sell it gots-ta-look-great! It is just one thing after another here...always maintening.
You know the story...the PO's 'improvements' list looked like this: added new pictures in living room, bought 2 lawn chairs, blah, blah, blah.
Whereas the improvements list we hand over (if we ever hand over!) will have a new roof, new furnace, new kitchen, renovated owners' qtrs, exterior painted, new doors, resurfaced driveway, new beds, new flooring, new bathroom tile, blah, blah, blah.
.
We even offer the new owner $20,000-30,000 in tax credits from the reno's! COME ON IN AND THIS FUN CAN ALL BE YOURS! :)
 

Generic

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It always surprises me at who chooses to be on these shows that show the worst of a business in hopes of improvement. And reading reviews of some of the restaurants that he has "fixed" seems to show that they aren't "fixed" most of the time because the fixes are superficial and the owners are often donkeys.
This can be done well for TV in a non-explotive manner, but who will watch it? It's much more sensationalistic to show cobwebs, dirty toilets and the such than it is to focus on the fact that they might be missing their mark with their breakfast (serving ham but many Muslims visiting) or not having the right size beds (people seeking Queen or King and not Doubles.).
Sometimes it takes a real outside source to focus someone's attention on their failings. You know we beat our heads on the keyboards when the same person asks the same question over and over and never take the advice offered. Maybe seeing themselves on TV smacks some sense into them.
Altho, the follow up comments on the restaurant show do seem to indicate that the owners 'slip' after a few months. What that means is they need a follow up visit and some reinforcement of the initial euphoria. Maybe they got so busy they couldn't keep up the pace. Maybe they were failing because they really don't want to be busy. Could be a lot of things.
Definitely not something I would sign up for. My skin isn't thick enough.
.
There was a show here that did the makeover part and the food part of the equation, didn't bother with the interpersonal part or the financials at all. The end result was that the show was called a "curse".
The reality is that it's composed of so many factors and you have to look into them ALL and not just gloss over by redoing a room and fixing the menu. Often that leaves them without the other tools.
Ramsay's original, in the UK was far superior in that they did look at all the factors. And remember, Ramsay himself has had a string of failures as well, he's not alway been the golden touch.
Want to see the hit list? It's at http://www.quora.com/What-restaurants-on-Kitchen-Nightmares-have-closed
.
Wow. That's a long list of fails even after getting help. Your point about just doing the surficial stuff is true. Without getting at the heart of the problem success is hard to come by.
.
Madeleine said:
Wow. That's a long list of fails even after getting help. Your point about just doing the surficial stuff is true. Without getting at the heart of the problem success is hard to come by.
I'm sure a lot of the closure problem is that people (the management) are a lot harder to change than decor and the menu!
.
Arkansawyer said:
Madeleine said:
Wow. That's a long list of fails even after getting help. Your point about just doing the surficial stuff is true. Without getting at the heart of the problem success is hard to come by.
I'm sure a lot of the closure problem is that people (the management) are a lot harder to change than decor and the menu!
A little perspective on that. Our place was a fully operational biz when we bought it but all the maintenance had been let go for 4+ years. The PO's were just collecting money. The place needed updating (and still does, in some areas) and each time we have made a change, I have felt a little lighter on my feet, a little happier to go to work each day.
So, making those surficial changes can make a big difference in how the owner feels. But, if they've lost the drive, it's not going to help and may make them feel worse.
I still have a 10 page wish list of things I would change if we had the money.
.
Madeleine said:
Arkansawyer said:
Madeleine said:
Wow. That's a long list of fails even after getting help. Your point about just doing the surficial stuff is true. Without getting at the heart of the problem success is hard to come by.
I'm sure a lot of the closure problem is that people (the management) are a lot harder to change than decor and the menu!
A little perspective on that. Our place was a fully operational biz when we bought it but all the maintenance had been let go for 4+ years. The PO's were just collecting money. The place needed updating (and still does, in some areas) and each time we have made a change, I have felt a little lighter on my feet, a little happier to go to work each day.
So, making those surficial changes can make a big difference in how the owner feels. But, if they've lost the drive, it's not going to help and may make them feel worse.
I still have a 10 page wish list of things I would change if we had the money.
Ye old deferred maintenance routine.
One thing asked for on all the for sale sites is "date of last renovation"
Admittedly it is hard to pour every cent you make back into it, but if you want it to sell it gots-ta-look-great! It is just one thing after another here...always maintening.
.
Joey Bloggs said:
Ye old deferred maintenance routine.
One thing asked for on all the for sale sites is "date of last renovation"
Admittedly it is hard to pour every cent you make back into it, but if you want it to sell it gots-ta-look-great! It is just one thing after another here...always maintening.
You know the story...the PO's 'improvements' list looked like this: added new pictures in living room, bought 2 lawn chairs, blah, blah, blah.
Whereas the improvements list we hand over (if we ever hand over!) will have a new roof, new furnace, new kitchen, renovated owners' qtrs, exterior painted, new doors, resurfaced driveway, new beds, new flooring, new bathroom tile, blah, blah, blah.
.
In the few years we are here....
New white elastomeric roof, roof insulation and electric skylight.
Two renovated bathrooms, two added bathrooms.
New kitchen & water closet. New Patio.
97% effecient furnace.
Indirect water-heater with lifetime warranty and enough hot water for 10 apartments.
New laundry faciliites.
Etc....
You just have to do the work and keep things in top shape, makes it easier for you and easier for the guests as well.
 
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