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How do I keep the crust from separating from my quiche?

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Proud Texan

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When we make a quiche, we sometimes have problem of the crust separating from the filling. We thought it might be cooling too quickly, but it seems to do this as it's cooking.
Any tips on how to keep this from happening?
 

JBloggs

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Is it a store bought crust like Pillsbury in disposable tin?
If so, the temp might be a factor. I cook mine 375 F for about 40 mins, the pie shells are mostly full, so the crust is not cooking on its own.
 

Morticia

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Do you partially cook the crust first?
 

Proud Texan

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Is it a store bought crust like Pillsbury in disposable tin?
If so, the temp might be a factor. I cook mine 375 F for about 40 mins, the pie shells are mostly full, so the crust is not cooking on its own..
We use the ready-made pie dough that you roll out.
 

Morticia

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Do you partially cook the crust first?.
No.
.
If the directions don't say to precook, you might try it anyway. About 15 minutes is usually enough. This is not something we've ever had happen, either with the pie crust in the tin or when I made pie crust from scratch. But it sounds like your 'batter' is not adhering to the crust. Could be temp, could be the crust is too 'slick'.
Right now we don't even use the crust anymore because so many guests turned down the quiche because it had a crust. Life got so much easier without the crust! I still get guests who decline the quiche until I say, 'There's no crust,' then they all want it.
But, probably a whole different demographic here as everyone keeps running across different responses to food wherever they are!
Today, I got a half pound of bacon for myself, so many guests turned it down. Silly people!
 

seashanty

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(don't tell) i make bisquick pat in the pan crust ... i'm not a big bisquick fan, but this makes a lovely, buttery flavored crust for quiche ... and it doesn't stick to the pan.
i melt butter in a big plastic bowl, add the bisquick and water, mix and then press into the pan with fingers ... if i need more because i'm using a big pan, i just stir up more. i bake it just about 10 minutes at 350 before adding the filling. this is not exactly per the box directions because i melt the butter and i don't use boiling water. for a big pan it is 1 stick butter, melted. add 2 cups bisquick and 4 Tbs hot water.
 

Proud Texan

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DW is concerned that if the pie crust is pre-baked that when the quiche is baked 350º for 50 minutes that it's going to be way too brown.
Her quiche is delicious, but we just have this little crust problem.
SeaShanty, Thanks for that tip. We'll try it (but not on guests just yet.
 

JBloggs

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Don't prebake the pie crust. The eggs take long enough to cook to overcook the crust as it is.
 

Morticia

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Don't prebake the pie crust. The eggs take long enough to cook to overcook the crust as it is..
Another option is to bake on 425 for 15 minutes WITH the eggs in there and then turn the heat down.
 

tedwin

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From Baking911.com:
But despite the gentle heat, if a custard is heated above 180 degrees F, the more tightly the proteins join together. They becoming thicker, curdling and squeezing out all the water which you see evidence of coming from little tunnels in the custard, called synersis. The egg proteins will overcoagulate from too much heat which eventually shrink when cooled.
 

Morticia

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From Baking911.com:
But despite the gentle heat, if a custard is heated above 180 degrees F, the more tightly the proteins join together. They becoming thicker, curdling and squeezing out all the water which you see evidence of coming from little tunnels in the custard, called synersis. The egg proteins will overcoagulate from too much heat which eventually shrink when cooled. .
So, you're thinking the temp in the oven is too high? I've seen that cracking in a quiche before and now I know there's a name for it. There's a name for everything!
 

tedwin

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From Baking911.com:
But despite the gentle heat, if a custard is heated above 180 degrees F, the more tightly the proteins join together. They becoming thicker, curdling and squeezing out all the water which you see evidence of coming from little tunnels in the custard, called synersis. The egg proteins will overcoagulate from too much heat which eventually shrink when cooled. .
So, you're thinking the temp in the oven is too high? I've seen that cracking in a quiche before and now I know there's a name for it. There's a name for everything!
.
Not necessarily the oven temperature, but that the custard might be in for too long. You can cook at high heat but you don't have as big a window between "done to perfection" and "chewy rubber sponge". Low heat cooking gives you a little more wiggle room on timing. Whichever approach, you shouldn't let the custard exceed 180 degrees.
 
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