How to antagonize Guests in 5 minutes flat

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gillumhouse

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I probably ticked my guest (him) off in 5 minutes flat. He said when making the reservation they had a Service Dog and volunteered it had papers. Immediately the red flags went up and I told him that although people think there are certificates for Service Dogs, there are not. I asked what service does it provide - and after some tongue tripping came up with notifies if a seizure is imminent.

They arrive - couple comes in, no dog. Show them the room and he launches in to she is a non-shedding, blah, blah, blah. I say I am surprised she did not come in with them since a Service Dog is an extension of its person. He said papers and I said there are no papers for a service dog and that is the problem for businesses where a dog is not permitted. He said he had a letter from his psychiatrist to which I replied I am not asking to that. He then said he has an assisted living facility and the HIPPA laws are crushing. They have gone to dinner - he wanted a place where he could get an adult beverage. Thank goodness they are a 1-night. One more to the very few in 25 years of B & B that I hope NEVER find me again.
 

gillumhouse

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Update - although it was not a Service Dog as we know them to be, once they brought it in (not sure if it went to dinner with them) it stayed close to him. It was a Labradoodle so was big enough for me to see to step over it (laid down, not next to him but in the pathway for me to get to my office or anywhere else except the kitchen). As they were leaving, I hissed at a cat in my yard and the dog jumped around - I doubt of the real deal would have moved - HE was already at the car and dog was on porch and I was in the doorway.
 

Anon Inn

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Sounds more like an emotional support dog. In my state long term landlords can not exclude tenants who need emotional support animals. For the inn, I've never been asked. We have the separate apartment for pet people.
 

Jay Curci

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I probably ticked my guest (him) off in 5 minutes flat. He said when making the reservation they had a Service Dog and volunteered it had papers. Immediately the red flags went up and I told him that although people think there are certificates for Service Dogs, there are not. I asked what service does it provide - and after some tongue tripping came up with notifies if a seizure is imminent.

They arrive - couple comes in, no dog. Show them the room and he launches in to she is a non-shedding, blah, blah, blah. I say I am surprised she did not come in with them since a Service Dog is an extension of its person. He said papers and I said there are no papers for a service dog and that is the problem for businesses where a dog is not permitted. He said he had a letter from his psychiatrist to which I replied I am not asking to that. He then said he has an assisted living facility and the HIPPA laws are crushing. They have gone to dinner - he wanted a place where he could get an adult beverage. Thank goodness they are a 1-night. One more to the very few in 25 years of B & B that I hope NEVER find me again.
It Happens! When it is a true Service Dog it is "Our Pleasure" to make them all comfortable. I am not fond of Guests with emotional support animals, as our experiences with them is the owner is usually trying to put one over. ??? Whatever, this is why it's called the Hospitality Industry. LOL
 

An Old Tavernkeeper

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Sounds more like an emotional support dog. In my state long term landlords can not exclude tenants who need emotional support animals. For the inn, I've never been asked. We have the separate apartment for pet people.
What state are you in? We have rental property in Virginia and North Carolina and the contract our Realtor and attorney use specifically does not allow any animals of any type for short or long term rentals. I don't know if I would be able to be a landlord in your state. Sounds like a recipe for property abuse. Like the people that rent through Airbnb and think they own the place.
 

Jay Curci

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We are also setting up an air B&B in an out building for Guests with Pets. It Should help some. We are Animal lovers but simply do not think pets fit well in the Inn. We want to be able to serve everyone equally and politely. J
 

Generic

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Here all dogs who are trained to provide a service have papers from the certified trainer and I have a right to see those papers. But nothing other than the certified trainer's documents are acceptable. And those are the only animals that I have to accept. And there are fines for faking the documents. And it's not any trainer... there are certified trainers.

There are also regulated collars/harnesses and you can be fined for using a fake as well.

But here, the law isn't national. So you go from province to province and the regulations change.
 

TheBeachHouse

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We are also setting up an air B&B in an out building for Guests with Pets. It Should help some. We are Animal lovers but simply do not think pets fit well in the Inn. We want to be able to serve everyone equally and politely. J
Air b n b is a search engine. I’m sensitive to the term being used to describe a rental. I’d say, we’re settinh up a pet friendly cottage
 

Morticia

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Air b n b is a search engine. I’m sensitive to the term being used to describe a rental. I’d say, we’re settinh up a pet friendly cottage
Maybe it really IS strictly rentable only on Airbnb. Unlike everyone else who wants to rent a room at our Airbnb, which we are not.
 

theinnonthird

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Per the ADA the service dog may not be left unattended by it's handler. So next time you have someone both their stay with a service dog, remind them that per ADA the dog has to be with them AT ALL TIMES, they may not leave it behind in the guest room while they go out to enjoy themselves. A true service dog and handler team will have no issue with that, the fake ones will be annoyed by it right quick.
 

FHI2426

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What state are you in? We have rental property in Virginia and North Carolina and the contract our Realtor and attorney use specifically does not allow any animals of any type for short or long term rentals. I don't know if I would be able to be a landlord in your state. Sounds like a recipe for property abuse. Like the people that rent through Airbnb and think they own the place.
Careful - it's ADA regulations you have to allow someone with a trained/certified service animal stay (not support pet). And some people with proper trained service animals are very knowledgeable about the federal/ADA law....
 

gillumhouse

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I am well aware of the Service Animal requirements which is why I said what I did to him. In July I celebrate 25 years of having made my home into a B & B. It was when he said "I have her certificate that I KNEW this was not a Service animal. They DID bring the dog down to breakfast - and instead of laying down at his side, chose to lay right where I had to step over her to get to my office and to some of the breakfast things. Fortunately she was large so even I could see her and she did not flick her tail so I missed stepping one that.

I had made my point so he knew I was aware to facts. the dog was OK, the people were nice enough, , but he was still OK with his belief he had a Service Dog (he told me he owns and operates an Assisted Living facility so he SHOULD be aware to the actual LAW.

Sometimes we just need to bitch and get it out of our systems so we can be pleasant when they arrive.
 

GoodScout

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I think the two most aggravating thing about those who abuse the ADA's service dog rules are:
1) They are making everyone suspicious and unwelcoming of true service animals, and
2) These people have truly convinced themselves that their pet is a real service animal and they're entitled to privileges they are not.
 

Generic

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I think the two most aggravating thing about those who abuse the ADA's service dog rules are:
1) They are making everyone suspicious and unwelcoming of true service animals, and
2) These people have truly convinced themselves that their pet is a real service animal and they're entitled to privileges they are not.
Which is one reason that the local organizations here are pushing to call the cops of fake ones and get them fined. And the documentation here is regulated as well... only certified training organization papers are acceptable. You can't use those "Internet" papers that anyone can create.
 

theinnonthird

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I wish that the ADA would call for clear government issued certification of service animals. It would make everyone's job so much easier and true service dog owners will no longer have to face the suspicions of business owners. It's not their fault that we doubt every single dog that comes through our doors, it's the fake ones.
 

gillumhouse

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Exactly!! The trainers and owners of REAL Service Dogs want it also. Getting the politicians to act requires it to be the "ox" of themselves or a family member that is being gored to get the legislation introduced and passed. Hmmmm, maybe I will send a letter to Shelly and Mojo.
 
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An Old Tavernkeeper

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Careful - it's ADA regulations you have to allow someone with a trained/certified service animal stay (not support pet). And some people with proper trained service animals are very knowledgeable about the federal/ADA law....
That's why we have a lawyer.

Here is the actual verbiage from the ADA act.

The ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) provides certain protections for those with disabilities to provide an equal opportunity to access, like for people without disabilities. For business owners, it is important to understand when, and when not, you are legally required to be ADA-compliant.

The ADA does not apply to privately held transient lodging, hostels, or 'bed and breakfast' type properties, run at a location the local authorities have classified as a residential property as long as that owning entity is not a non-profit and currently has 14 or less employees.
 

Morticia

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That's why we have a lawyer.

Here is the actual verbiage from the ADA act.

The ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) provides certain protections for those with disabilities to provide an equal opportunity to access, like for people without disabilities. For business owners, it is important to understand when, and when not, you are legally required to be ADA-compliant.

The ADA does not apply to privately held transient lodging, hostels, or 'bed and breakfast' type properties, run at a location the local authorities have classified as a residential property as long as that owning entity is not a non-profit and currently has 14 or less employees.
If that quote is true, how are the scammers winning the lawsuits for what they are calling non-compliant websites? If the whole act does not apply, how come these lawsuits have not been thrown out?
 

GoodScout

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It's not quite true. The ADA and the Justice Department have consistently said that bed and breakfasts that a) have the owner living on property AND b) have 5 or fewer rooms are not subject to the rules of the ADA. Otherwise, they do fit the definition of transient lodging.
The law by my reading says nothing about the number of employees dictating whether access must be applied, and I'd like to see a citation for this claim.
 

Riverparkinn

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It's not quite true. The ADA and the Justice Department have consistently said that bed and breakfasts that a) have the owner living on property AND b) have 5 or fewer rooms are not subject to the rules of the ADA. Otherwise, they do fit the definition of transient lodging.
The law by my reading says nothing about the number of employees dictating whether access must be applied, and I'd like to see a citation for this claim.
It's not quite true. The ADA and the Justice Department have consistently said that bed and breakfasts that a) have the owner living on property AND b) have 5 or fewer rooms are not subject to the rules of the ADA. Otherwise, they do fit the definition of transient lodging.
The law by my reading says nothing about the number of employees dictating whether access must be applied, and I'd like to see a citation for this claim.
I agree with Good Scout that owner occupied and no more than 5 guest rooms is not by definition a public accommodation and not subject to ADA compliance.
The ADA compliant website issue is another animal. Creepy lawyers will hire a plaintiff to send you a letter of intent even if they have no intention of staying with you. They will want to settle out of court. If you are not funded to hire an attorney, go to court or settle, then get an ADA compliant website and booking engine. A blind person should be able to book a room without using a mouse. Well funded companies are fighting this in court but still unresolved as far as I know.
 
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