How to handle an EVENT cancellation?

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Morticia

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This is not an event taking place at the inn, it's a town-wide event that was cancelled. Hundreds of reservations were made all over town and now they have all cancelled.
How would you handle this? It's not the guest perse who is cancelling, it's the event coordinators who cancelled. Not sure if the hotels had some sort of event insurance, but what about the smaller properties, some of which have been filled for months?
 

Copperhead

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I guess I would use our normal cancellation policy. How much notice was given of the cancellation? Is this normally an annual event or one time? I would get all the small properties together to voice my concerns with the event leaders in my area so they understand how this affects small business.
 

Morticia

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I guess I would use our normal cancellation policy. How much notice was given of the cancellation? Is this normally an annual event or one time? I would get all the small properties together to voice my concerns with the event leaders in my area so they understand how this affects small business..
One time (altho it might have become an annual event). Cancelled today for this weekend. Which is what makes it so hard to handle.
 

muirford

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I guess I would use our normal cancellation policy. How much notice was given of the cancellation? Is this normally an annual event or one time? I would get all the small properties together to voice my concerns with the event leaders in my area so they understand how this affects small business..
One time (altho it might have become an annual event). Cancelled today for this weekend. Which is what makes it so hard to handle.
.
that stinks...
Anyway to put something together on an informal basis - party among inns, special addons, dinners/wine tasting/cooking - that might take the place for guests who still want to come? I wouldn't want to cancel a weekend away so close to the event. Is it cancelled due to weather? If so, I would probably let guests cancel if they want. We did that for V-Day weekend here.
 

Innkeeper To Go

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I guess I would use our normal cancellation policy. How much notice was given of the cancellation? Is this normally an annual event or one time? I would get all the small properties together to voice my concerns with the event leaders in my area so they understand how this affects small business..
One time (altho it might have become an annual event). Cancelled today for this weekend. Which is what makes it so hard to handle.
.
that stinks...
Anyway to put something together on an informal basis - party among inns, special addons, dinners/wine tasting/cooking - that might take the place for guests who still want to come? I wouldn't want to cancel a weekend away so close to the event. Is it cancelled due to weather? If so, I would probably let guests cancel if they want. We did that for V-Day weekend here.
.
Ditto.
 

Morticia

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I guess I would use our normal cancellation policy. How much notice was given of the cancellation? Is this normally an annual event or one time? I would get all the small properties together to voice my concerns with the event leaders in my area so they understand how this affects small business..
One time (altho it might have become an annual event). Cancelled today for this weekend. Which is what makes it so hard to handle.
.
that stinks...
Anyway to put something together on an informal basis - party among inns, special addons, dinners/wine tasting/cooking - that might take the place for guests who still want to come? I wouldn't want to cancel a weekend away so close to the event. Is it cancelled due to weather? If so, I would probably let guests cancel if they want. We did that for V-Day weekend here.
.
Good ideas but I just found out the event wasn't canceled, it was moved. So, all guests are going elsewhere. Yes, due to weather. Something like 200+ rooms were canceled today.
I heard from a few other smaller places and they are going to charge half to the guests. Not their fault the whole thing was moved, but...
Remind me if I ever bring up 'weather-related' events that I don't want to push to get those guests!
So many things have been canceled here due to the weather this month. No snow and no cold.
But, happy days, sugaring has started. Apparently the earliest this has ever happened. So, the new syrup will be out sooner!
 

Innkeeper To Go

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I guess I would use our normal cancellation policy. How much notice was given of the cancellation? Is this normally an annual event or one time? I would get all the small properties together to voice my concerns with the event leaders in my area so they understand how this affects small business..
One time (altho it might have become an annual event). Cancelled today for this weekend. Which is what makes it so hard to handle.
.
that stinks...
Anyway to put something together on an informal basis - party among inns, special addons, dinners/wine tasting/cooking - that might take the place for guests who still want to come? I wouldn't want to cancel a weekend away so close to the event. Is it cancelled due to weather? If so, I would probably let guests cancel if they want. We did that for V-Day weekend here.
.
Good ideas but I just found out the event wasn't canceled, it was moved. So, all guests are going elsewhere. Yes, due to weather. Something like 200+ rooms were canceled today.
I heard from a few other smaller places and they are going to charge half to the guests. Not their fault the whole thing was moved, but...
Remind me if I ever bring up 'weather-related' events that I don't want to push to get those guests!
So many things have been canceled here due to the weather this month. No snow and no cold.
But, happy days, sugaring has started. Apparently the earliest this has ever happened. So, the new syrup will be out sooner!
.
I know I'm the exception to how most places do this. But when I'm managing an inn, one of the things I do when taking a reservation is ask for the reason they're visiting the area.
When there's an event - of any kind - going on in the area, I'll set up an event alert in the book and won't accept reservations for all of the rooms for the same event.
I basically do this for the same reason that you're dealing with this now.
The percentage of rooms I'll block off depends on the event and the season. In high season, I generally know I can rebook at the last minute so may accept 50% for the same event. Never more. In the shoulder seasons, generally 25%.
Once we get closer to the date of the event, I'll start opening up rooms. And there are always repeat guests who are not part of an event and I'll open up rooms for them.
It's really how I'm able to maintain strong occupancy. And no, I don't tell guests why. Rooms are just not available until I'm fairly certain that the event-goers have booked elsewhere.
 

Morticia

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I guess I would use our normal cancellation policy. How much notice was given of the cancellation? Is this normally an annual event or one time? I would get all the small properties together to voice my concerns with the event leaders in my area so they understand how this affects small business..
One time (altho it might have become an annual event). Cancelled today for this weekend. Which is what makes it so hard to handle.
.
that stinks...
Anyway to put something together on an informal basis - party among inns, special addons, dinners/wine tasting/cooking - that might take the place for guests who still want to come? I wouldn't want to cancel a weekend away so close to the event. Is it cancelled due to weather? If so, I would probably let guests cancel if they want. We did that for V-Day weekend here.
.
Good ideas but I just found out the event wasn't canceled, it was moved. So, all guests are going elsewhere. Yes, due to weather. Something like 200+ rooms were canceled today.
I heard from a few other smaller places and they are going to charge half to the guests. Not their fault the whole thing was moved, but...
Remind me if I ever bring up 'weather-related' events that I don't want to push to get those guests!
So many things have been canceled here due to the weather this month. No snow and no cold.
But, happy days, sugaring has started. Apparently the earliest this has ever happened. So, the new syrup will be out sooner!
.
I know I'm the exception to how most places do this. But when I'm managing an inn, one of the things I do when taking a reservation is ask for the reason they're visiting the area.
When there's an event - of any kind - going on in the area, I'll set up an event alert in the book and won't accept reservations for all of the rooms for the same event.
I basically do this for the same reason that you're dealing with this now.
The percentage of rooms I'll block off depends on the event and the season. In high season, I generally know I can rebook at the last minute so may accept 50% for the same event. Never more. In the shoulder seasons, generally 25%.
Once we get closer to the date of the event, I'll start opening up rooms. And there are always repeat guests who are not part of an event and I'll open up rooms for them.
It's really how I'm able to maintain strong occupancy. And no, I don't tell guests why. Rooms are just not available until I'm fairly certain that the event-goers have booked elsewhere.
.
Funny, how guests will read the fine print about 'group' bookings and all book online and never once mention they're all together.
Luckily, we didn't have anyone from this event.
 

Morticia

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The event moved 75 miles away. But, you know, 'You cahn't get theah from heah.' At least not in less than 2 hours. So, no, they didn't want to stay put and drive. However, at the last minute, not sure where they're all staying given they went to a ski area which was probably mostly full already.
 

muirford

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I guess I would use our normal cancellation policy. How much notice was given of the cancellation? Is this normally an annual event or one time? I would get all the small properties together to voice my concerns with the event leaders in my area so they understand how this affects small business..
One time (altho it might have become an annual event). Cancelled today for this weekend. Which is what makes it so hard to handle.
.
that stinks...
Anyway to put something together on an informal basis - party among inns, special addons, dinners/wine tasting/cooking - that might take the place for guests who still want to come? I wouldn't want to cancel a weekend away so close to the event. Is it cancelled due to weather? If so, I would probably let guests cancel if they want. We did that for V-Day weekend here.
.
Good ideas but I just found out the event wasn't canceled, it was moved. So, all guests are going elsewhere. Yes, due to weather. Something like 200+ rooms were canceled today.
I heard from a few other smaller places and they are going to charge half to the guests. Not their fault the whole thing was moved, but...
Remind me if I ever bring up 'weather-related' events that I don't want to push to get those guests!
So many things have been canceled here due to the weather this month. No snow and no cold.
But, happy days, sugaring has started. Apparently the earliest this has ever happened. So, the new syrup will be out sooner!
.
I know I'm the exception to how most places do this. But when I'm managing an inn, one of the things I do when taking a reservation is ask for the reason they're visiting the area.
When there's an event - of any kind - going on in the area, I'll set up an event alert in the book and won't accept reservations for all of the rooms for the same event.
I basically do this for the same reason that you're dealing with this now.
The percentage of rooms I'll block off depends on the event and the season. In high season, I generally know I can rebook at the last minute so may accept 50% for the same event. Never more. In the shoulder seasons, generally 25%.
Once we get closer to the date of the event, I'll start opening up rooms. And there are always repeat guests who are not part of an event and I'll open up rooms for them.
It's really how I'm able to maintain strong occupancy. And no, I don't tell guests why. Rooms are just not available until I'm fairly certain that the event-goers have booked elsewhere.
.
Wow, that is different. I definitely don't follow that practice. Every July we have a festival in town which fills all of my rooms for at least four days a week for 22 days. When we bought the inn seven years ago, we had about a half dozen reservations in advance for those dates - now we are usually half to three-quarters full for those dates a year in advance, and always full a month in advance. Some of these guests now come other times during the year, and they all look forward to seeing the same people and sharing their theater experiences with each other, even if they only see them once a year. I have really come to enjoy those weekends myself. One year, when the plays were kind of crappy, a couple told me they really came for staying with us more than for the plays.
I'm not saying I don't understand your theory, but it's not something I've put into practice. And if I had an event now - slow season for me, and I think for Mort, too - I wouldn't have many other reservations besides the event. I wouldn't turn them away.
 

seashanty

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how far away, in such a short time, have the organizers moved the event to? so very far away that people with room reservations don't want to stay in your town but move closer to the 'action'? if i had a contact person for this event, i think they should be told how this hurts all your businesses and ask the organizers to encourage those with rooms to keep their reservations. i'm so sorry! and during slow times ... with no snow to draw skiers ... of course you would have been so happy to take event reservations.
 

Innkeeper To Go

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I guess I would use our normal cancellation policy. How much notice was given of the cancellation? Is this normally an annual event or one time? I would get all the small properties together to voice my concerns with the event leaders in my area so they understand how this affects small business..
One time (altho it might have become an annual event). Cancelled today for this weekend. Which is what makes it so hard to handle.
.
that stinks...
Anyway to put something together on an informal basis - party among inns, special addons, dinners/wine tasting/cooking - that might take the place for guests who still want to come? I wouldn't want to cancel a weekend away so close to the event. Is it cancelled due to weather? If so, I would probably let guests cancel if they want. We did that for V-Day weekend here.
.
Good ideas but I just found out the event wasn't canceled, it was moved. So, all guests are going elsewhere. Yes, due to weather. Something like 200+ rooms were canceled today.
I heard from a few other smaller places and they are going to charge half to the guests. Not their fault the whole thing was moved, but...
Remind me if I ever bring up 'weather-related' events that I don't want to push to get those guests!
So many things have been canceled here due to the weather this month. No snow and no cold.
But, happy days, sugaring has started. Apparently the earliest this has ever happened. So, the new syrup will be out sooner!
.
I know I'm the exception to how most places do this. But when I'm managing an inn, one of the things I do when taking a reservation is ask for the reason they're visiting the area.
When there's an event - of any kind - going on in the area, I'll set up an event alert in the book and won't accept reservations for all of the rooms for the same event.
I basically do this for the same reason that you're dealing with this now.
The percentage of rooms I'll block off depends on the event and the season. In high season, I generally know I can rebook at the last minute so may accept 50% for the same event. Never more. In the shoulder seasons, generally 25%.
Once we get closer to the date of the event, I'll start opening up rooms. And there are always repeat guests who are not part of an event and I'll open up rooms for them.
It's really how I'm able to maintain strong occupancy. And no, I don't tell guests why. Rooms are just not available until I'm fairly certain that the event-goers have booked elsewhere.
.
Wow, that is different. I definitely don't follow that practice. Every July we have a festival in town which fills all of my rooms for at least four days a week for 22 days. When we bought the inn seven years ago, we had about a half dozen reservations in advance for those dates - now we are usually half to three-quarters full for those dates a year in advance, and always full a month in advance. Some of these guests now come other times during the year, and they all look forward to seeing the same people and sharing their theater experiences with each other, even if they only see them once a year. I have really come to enjoy those weekends myself. One year, when the plays were kind of crappy, a couple told me they really came for staying with us more than for the plays.
I'm not saying I don't understand your theory, but it's not something I've put into practice. And if I had an event now - slow season for me, and I think for Mort, too - I wouldn't have many other reservations besides the event. I wouldn't turn them away.
.
muirford said:
And if I had an event now - slow season for me, and I think for Mort, too - I wouldn't have many other reservations besides the event. I wouldn't turn them away.
I couldn't agree more. Slow seasons, especially this year, are an altogether different creature than other times of the year. I think any one of us would have, just like Morticia, been glad for the bookings in February.
 

Innkeeper To Go

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I guess I would use our normal cancellation policy. How much notice was given of the cancellation? Is this normally an annual event or one time? I would get all the small properties together to voice my concerns with the event leaders in my area so they understand how this affects small business..
One time (altho it might have become an annual event). Cancelled today for this weekend. Which is what makes it so hard to handle.
.
that stinks...
Anyway to put something together on an informal basis - party among inns, special addons, dinners/wine tasting/cooking - that might take the place for guests who still want to come? I wouldn't want to cancel a weekend away so close to the event. Is it cancelled due to weather? If so, I would probably let guests cancel if they want. We did that for V-Day weekend here.
.
Good ideas but I just found out the event wasn't canceled, it was moved. So, all guests are going elsewhere. Yes, due to weather. Something like 200+ rooms were canceled today.
I heard from a few other smaller places and they are going to charge half to the guests. Not their fault the whole thing was moved, but...
Remind me if I ever bring up 'weather-related' events that I don't want to push to get those guests!
So many things have been canceled here due to the weather this month. No snow and no cold.
But, happy days, sugaring has started. Apparently the earliest this has ever happened. So, the new syrup will be out sooner!
.
I know I'm the exception to how most places do this. But when I'm managing an inn, one of the things I do when taking a reservation is ask for the reason they're visiting the area.
When there's an event - of any kind - going on in the area, I'll set up an event alert in the book and won't accept reservations for all of the rooms for the same event.
I basically do this for the same reason that you're dealing with this now.
The percentage of rooms I'll block off depends on the event and the season. In high season, I generally know I can rebook at the last minute so may accept 50% for the same event. Never more. In the shoulder seasons, generally 25%.
Once we get closer to the date of the event, I'll start opening up rooms. And there are always repeat guests who are not part of an event and I'll open up rooms for them.
It's really how I'm able to maintain strong occupancy. And no, I don't tell guests why. Rooms are just not available until I'm fairly certain that the event-goers have booked elsewhere.
.
Funny, how guests will read the fine print about 'group' bookings and all book online and never once mention they're all together.
Luckily, we didn't have anyone from this event.
.
Guests will get around group policies if they can. That's why I try to fend them off at the pass.
And how lucky for you not to have anyone for the event! I'm sure everyone in town is in a tizzy over this.
 

Copperhead

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I guess I would use our normal cancellation policy. How much notice was given of the cancellation? Is this normally an annual event or one time? I would get all the small properties together to voice my concerns with the event leaders in my area so they understand how this affects small business..
One time (altho it might have become an annual event). Cancelled today for this weekend. Which is what makes it so hard to handle.
.
that stinks...
Anyway to put something together on an informal basis - party among inns, special addons, dinners/wine tasting/cooking - that might take the place for guests who still want to come? I wouldn't want to cancel a weekend away so close to the event. Is it cancelled due to weather? If so, I would probably let guests cancel if they want. We did that for V-Day weekend here.
.
Good ideas but I just found out the event wasn't canceled, it was moved. So, all guests are going elsewhere. Yes, due to weather. Something like 200+ rooms were canceled today.
I heard from a few other smaller places and they are going to charge half to the guests. Not their fault the whole thing was moved, but...
Remind me if I ever bring up 'weather-related' events that I don't want to push to get those guests!
So many things have been canceled here due to the weather this month. No snow and no cold.
But, happy days, sugaring has started. Apparently the earliest this has ever happened. So, the new syrup will be out sooner!
.
I know I'm the exception to how most places do this. But when I'm managing an inn, one of the things I do when taking a reservation is ask for the reason they're visiting the area.
When there's an event - of any kind - going on in the area, I'll set up an event alert in the book and won't accept reservations for all of the rooms for the same event.
I basically do this for the same reason that you're dealing with this now.
The percentage of rooms I'll block off depends on the event and the season. In high season, I generally know I can rebook at the last minute so may accept 50% for the same event. Never more. In the shoulder seasons, generally 25%.
Once we get closer to the date of the event, I'll start opening up rooms. And there are always repeat guests who are not part of an event and I'll open up rooms for them.
It's really how I'm able to maintain strong occupancy. And no, I don't tell guests why. Rooms are just not available until I'm fairly certain that the event-goers have booked elsewhere.
.
Funny, how guests will read the fine print about 'group' bookings and all book online and never once mention they're all together.
Luckily, we didn't have anyone from this event.
.
Morticia said:
Funny, how guests will read the fine print about 'group' bookings and all book online and never once mention they're all together.
Luckily, we didn't have anyone from this event.
Count your blessings indeed!
It seems that those that DID have these bookings should be subject to the policies as they stand. They did not have special conditions placed on their reservations that if the event gets moved or is canceled, they can cancel with no penalties. And since there is no weather related issues preventing them from getting there, they can not squack about that either.
This is one reason I do give 'group discount bookings'. While they get a discount (minor) for booking as a group, it does come with more protection for me, their cancellation is 30 days prior, with payment in full due at that time. No refunds unless I am able to rebook. Usually groups see the discount and are happy, they really do not think of any of the other considerations...
 

Copperhead

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I guess I would use our normal cancellation policy. How much notice was given of the cancellation? Is this normally an annual event or one time? I would get all the small properties together to voice my concerns with the event leaders in my area so they understand how this affects small business..
One time (altho it might have become an annual event). Cancelled today for this weekend. Which is what makes it so hard to handle.
.
that stinks...
Anyway to put something together on an informal basis - party among inns, special addons, dinners/wine tasting/cooking - that might take the place for guests who still want to come? I wouldn't want to cancel a weekend away so close to the event. Is it cancelled due to weather? If so, I would probably let guests cancel if they want. We did that for V-Day weekend here.
.
Good ideas but I just found out the event wasn't canceled, it was moved. So, all guests are going elsewhere. Yes, due to weather. Something like 200+ rooms were canceled today.
I heard from a few other smaller places and they are going to charge half to the guests. Not their fault the whole thing was moved, but...
Remind me if I ever bring up 'weather-related' events that I don't want to push to get those guests!
So many things have been canceled here due to the weather this month. No snow and no cold.
But, happy days, sugaring has started. Apparently the earliest this has ever happened. So, the new syrup will be out sooner!
.
I know I'm the exception to how most places do this. But when I'm managing an inn, one of the things I do when taking a reservation is ask for the reason they're visiting the area.
When there's an event - of any kind - going on in the area, I'll set up an event alert in the book and won't accept reservations for all of the rooms for the same event.
I basically do this for the same reason that you're dealing with this now.
The percentage of rooms I'll block off depends on the event and the season. In high season, I generally know I can rebook at the last minute so may accept 50% for the same event. Never more. In the shoulder seasons, generally 25%.
Once we get closer to the date of the event, I'll start opening up rooms. And there are always repeat guests who are not part of an event and I'll open up rooms for them.
It's really how I'm able to maintain strong occupancy. And no, I don't tell guests why. Rooms are just not available until I'm fairly certain that the event-goers have booked elsewhere.
.
Wow, that is different. I definitely don't follow that practice. Every July we have a festival in town which fills all of my rooms for at least four days a week for 22 days. When we bought the inn seven years ago, we had about a half dozen reservations in advance for those dates - now we are usually half to three-quarters full for those dates a year in advance, and always full a month in advance. Some of these guests now come other times during the year, and they all look forward to seeing the same people and sharing their theater experiences with each other, even if they only see them once a year. I have really come to enjoy those weekends myself. One year, when the plays were kind of crappy, a couple told me they really came for staying with us more than for the plays.
I'm not saying I don't understand your theory, but it's not something I've put into practice. And if I had an event now - slow season for me, and I think for Mort, too - I wouldn't have many other reservations besides the event. I wouldn't turn them away.
.
Same here, Muirford. Guess it may work for some places but not here. Those weekends fill fast and yes some a year in advance and are not dependent on any given weather.
I stay away from sporting events if I can...that is where I see touble with cancelations. But if they are willing to book knowing my policies, let them go ahead.
 

JBloggs

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Boy I would love it if this was under POLICIES so I could find it again.
I just saw this article and thought it might be good info for this thread:
http://www.elliott.org/blog/a-failure-to-launch-and-refund/
excerpt:
[FONT= 'Times New Roman']Glenn Cox had planned a trip to Orlando to watch the next Space Shuttle launch, but when liftoff was postponed, he found himself holding a hotel reservation with some surprise restrictions. His room at Orlando Airport SpringHill Suites by Marriott was completely nonrefundable, to be exact[/FONT]
 

Copperhead

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Boy I would love it if this was under POLICIES so I could find it again.
I just saw this article and thought it might be good info for this thread:
http://www.elliott.org/blog/a-failure-to-launch-and-refund/
excerpt:
[FONT= 'Times New Roman']Glenn Cox had planned a trip to Orlando to watch the next Space Shuttle launch, but when liftoff was postponed, he found himself holding a hotel reservation with some surprise restrictions. His room at Orlando Airport SpringHill Suites by Marriott was completely nonrefundable, to be exact[/FONT].
Gee, imagine that, a special with a catch. As far as I am conserned, Cox should, and most likely did, know better. Marriott is not the only hotel to do this type of thing and I am sure it was clear enough, it is just (as I mentioned) people see a discounted price and that is that, they fail to read the other parts. They plan to go on their trip, got a good rate at a great place. Everyone wants the cake and eat it to, without the calories and pounds that go along with it. As far as I am conserned, Cox gambled and lost then demanded the casino return his money because he did not understand the game.
 

Morticia

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Boy I would love it if this was under POLICIES so I could find it again.
I just saw this article and thought it might be good info for this thread:
http://www.elliott.org/blog/a-failure-to-launch-and-refund/
excerpt:
[FONT= 'Times New Roman']Glenn Cox had planned a trip to Orlando to watch the next Space Shuttle launch, but when liftoff was postponed, he found himself holding a hotel reservation with some surprise restrictions. His room at Orlando Airport SpringHill Suites by Marriott was completely nonrefundable, to be exact[/FONT].
Joey Bloggs said:
Boy I would love it if this was under POLICIES so I could find it again.
Done.
 

JBloggs

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9
Boy I would love it if this was under POLICIES so I could find it again.
I just saw this article and thought it might be good info for this thread:
http://www.elliott.org/blog/a-failure-to-launch-and-refund/
excerpt:
[FONT= 'Times New Roman']Glenn Cox had planned a trip to Orlando to watch the next Space Shuttle launch, but when liftoff was postponed, he found himself holding a hotel reservation with some surprise restrictions. His room at Orlando Airport SpringHill Suites by Marriott was completely nonrefundable, to be exact[/FONT].
Gee, imagine that, a special with a catch. As far as I am conserned, Cox should, and most likely did, know better. Marriott is not the only hotel to do this type of thing and I am sure it was clear enough, it is just (as I mentioned) people see a discounted price and that is that, they fail to read the other parts. They plan to go on their trip, got a good rate at a great place. Everyone wants the cake and eat it to, without the calories and pounds that go along with it. As far as I am conserned, Cox gambled and lost then demanded the casino return his money because he did not understand the game.
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Copperhead said:
Gee, imagine that, a special with a catch. As far as I am conserned, Cox should, and most likely did, know better. Marriott is not the only hotel to do this type of thing and I am sure it was clear enough, it is just (as I mentioned) people see a discounted price and that is that, they fail to read the other parts. They plan to go on their trip, got a good rate at a great place. Everyone wants the cake and eat it to, without the calories and pounds that go along with it. As far as I am conserned, Cox gambled and lost then demanded the casino return his money because he did not understand the game.
Just like an airline ticket...non refundable means non refundable. I am amazed at how many try to get out of it for room bookings. If you made the rez, you agreed to the policies, cut n dry. Done deal.
 

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