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Innkeeper Couple Salary Question

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ServingSouthernComfort

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Hi Everyone!
We are a husband wife team who have 25 years of travel/hospitaltiy and property management experience - but no direct inn, motel, hotel, or lodge innkeeping experience. Before we begin interviewing innkeeper jobs we want to find out what the average innkeeper-couple salary is. We want to be able to be able to speak to a potential employer about this with confidence that our expectations are reasonable. Thanks to anyone who can help us with this!!
Blessings!
 

gillumhouse

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I am saying this off the top of my head as I have no figures for you - however, I doubt if there IS an average. it would depend on the size of the property, duties expected, occupancy, location, etc. So many variables. It would also depend on what the innkeepers expect to receive as a "living wage" for their needs/wants. 2-man operation or staff, yard work or none.....
 

Alibi Ike

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I'm not sure anyone here is going to be willing to post on an open forum what they make for a living. Maybe someone will email with info. Be sure you have an email listed on your account here.
As a start, you might do some online searches for job openings and see what is being offered.
Given some of the horror stories innkeepers have come here with of 52 weeks/year with no time off and squalid living conditions, absentee or micro-managing employers, be very careful wherever you go that you have a complete understanding of what you are getting into.
If you haven't already, make a list of what requirements you have for the job: salary, free place to live, utilities included, health care pkg, vacation time, time off during the day/week, what responsibilities you are willing/not willing to undertake.
Some innkeepers have found their duties expanding far beyond what the original job entailed due to low occupancy rates. Other employees were let go and the innkeeping couple were expected to undertake those tasks in addition to everything else.
Which is something else to keep in mind...do you expect a flat salary or commissions as well? If you increase occupancy by 20% will you share in the wealth? If there is a really bad year due to events beyond your control will you experience a similar loss in your income?
Are you a 2-for-1 couple or do you expect to each make a salary?
What size property are you willing to undertake? Will you want to be in charge of everything or work under a manager/owner?
 

Alibi Ike

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I'm not sure anyone here is going to be willing to post on an open forum what they make for a living. Maybe someone will email with info. Be sure you have an email listed on your account here.
As a start, you might do some online searches for job openings and see what is being offered.
Given some of the horror stories innkeepers have come here with of 52 weeks/year with no time off and squalid living conditions, absentee or micro-managing employers, be very careful wherever you go that you have a complete understanding of what you are getting into.
If you haven't already, make a list of what requirements you have for the job: salary, free place to live, utilities included, health care pkg, vacation time, time off during the day/week, what responsibilities you are willing/not willing to undertake.
Some innkeepers have found their duties expanding far beyond what the original job entailed due to low occupancy rates. Other employees were let go and the innkeeping couple were expected to undertake those tasks in addition to everything else.
Which is something else to keep in mind...do you expect a flat salary or commissions as well? If you increase occupancy by 20% will you share in the wealth? If there is a really bad year due to events beyond your control will you experience a similar loss in your income?
Are you a 2-for-1 couple or do you expect to each make a salary?
What size property are you willing to undertake? Will you want to be in charge of everything or work under a manager/owner?.
A couple of other things to keep in mind...do you see yourselves as doing all of the work at a property or are you hiring on as the management? You will probably command a higher salary as 'management' than 'Jack & Jill of all trades'.
 

ServingSouthernComfort

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I'm not sure anyone here is going to be willing to post on an open forum what they make for a living. Maybe someone will email with info. Be sure you have an email listed on your account here.
As a start, you might do some online searches for job openings and see what is being offered.
Given some of the horror stories innkeepers have come here with of 52 weeks/year with no time off and squalid living conditions, absentee or micro-managing employers, be very careful wherever you go that you have a complete understanding of what you are getting into.
If you haven't already, make a list of what requirements you have for the job: salary, free place to live, utilities included, health care pkg, vacation time, time off during the day/week, what responsibilities you are willing/not willing to undertake.
Some innkeepers have found their duties expanding far beyond what the original job entailed due to low occupancy rates. Other employees were let go and the innkeeping couple were expected to undertake those tasks in addition to everything else.
Which is something else to keep in mind...do you expect a flat salary or commissions as well? If you increase occupancy by 20% will you share in the wealth? If there is a really bad year due to events beyond your control will you experience a similar loss in your income?
Are you a 2-for-1 couple or do you expect to each make a salary?
What size property are you willing to undertake? Will you want to be in charge of everything or work under a manager/owner?.
Wow! Thankyou. You gave me a lot of information and confirmation, as well. It helps to know that what we were thinking salary should look like is at least in the ballpark of how things work.
And yes, I had thought people might would PM me via e-mail - but, I guess I should have said something in the post in reference to that. My e-mail addy is dekdwalker@yahoo.com.
Thank you again for your help!!
 

ServingSouthernComfort

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I'm not sure anyone here is going to be willing to post on an open forum what they make for a living. Maybe someone will email with info. Be sure you have an email listed on your account here.
As a start, you might do some online searches for job openings and see what is being offered.
Given some of the horror stories innkeepers have come here with of 52 weeks/year with no time off and squalid living conditions, absentee or micro-managing employers, be very careful wherever you go that you have a complete understanding of what you are getting into.
If you haven't already, make a list of what requirements you have for the job: salary, free place to live, utilities included, health care pkg, vacation time, time off during the day/week, what responsibilities you are willing/not willing to undertake.
Some innkeepers have found their duties expanding far beyond what the original job entailed due to low occupancy rates. Other employees were let go and the innkeeping couple were expected to undertake those tasks in addition to everything else.
Which is something else to keep in mind...do you expect a flat salary or commissions as well? If you increase occupancy by 20% will you share in the wealth? If there is a really bad year due to events beyond your control will you experience a similar loss in your income?
Are you a 2-for-1 couple or do you expect to each make a salary?
What size property are you willing to undertake? Will you want to be in charge of everything or work under a manager/owner?.
A couple of other things to keep in mind...do you see yourselves as doing all of the work at a property or are you hiring on as the management? You will probably command a higher salary as 'management' than 'Jack & Jill of all trades'.
.
Thanks so much!I hadn't considered that management would make MORE than j&j of all trades - but that makes sense.
 

ServingSouthernComfort

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I am saying this off the top of my head as I have no figures for you - however, I doubt if there IS an average. it would depend on the size of the property, duties expected, occupancy, location, etc. So many variables. It would also depend on what the innkeepers expect to receive as a "living wage" for their needs/wants. 2-man operation or staff, yard work or none......
HI! and thank you for your reply. I have kind of looked out there on the Internet and found that you are right - lots of variables can determine the salary. I've seen a median salary of $41,000. But the variables make me wonder if this figure is a total of the living quarters + monetary, or if that is in addition to, or if that is the salary per person ion a team - or the total overall salary for the team. I don't see many job ads that say: "Compensation includes $41,000 + living quarter and utilities." They usually say something like, "Salary + living quarters...." So that leaves me with little to go on, ya know? Thanks anyways.
 

Samster

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Make sure that you have a contract. I know large inns that have just let their innkeepers go with virtually no warning.
 

InnCaring

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Hi there,
As a former innkeeper myself, I would be hesitant to hire someone who had not had direct B&B experience in running a bed and breakfast. Travel/hospitality and property management experience is good, but it is still a lot different than running a bed and breakfast day in and day out. The hands on experience is very important to most owners.
The salary price range is going to be all over the map and is going to depend on some of the following: Where the inn is located, how busy are they, how large a property it is, what are your duties going to be, what is expected of you in the way of increasing the business plus a lot more. Some inns will quote a low salary but then add in housing, car, utilities, health care etc. Some inns will quote a straight salary (including housing), but not much else. There is no standard. It will all come down to what your expectations and needs are and what you feel you are willing to work for. There also is a difference between full time year round employment and short term from one week to a few months or season employment.
You may want to consider taking a hands on interim innkeeper (innsitter) seminar. There are a few of us out there that do give these types of seminars. This would help round out the areas which you may currently lack. One of the aspects you will need to learn if you have not dealt with it before is reservation management systems.
You can contact me for more information at info@inncaring.com
Lynda
ServingSouthernComfort said:
Hi Everyone!
We are a husband wife team who have 25 years of travel/hospitaltiy and property management experience - but no direct inn, motel, hotel, or lodge innkeeping experience. Before we begin interviewing innkeeper jobs we want to find out what the average innkeeper-couple salary is. We want to be able to be able to speak to a potential employer about this with confidence that our expectations are reasonable. Thanks to anyone who can help us with this!!
Blessings!
 

April

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If I may say bed and breakfast business is not in generally extremely profitable venture. A lot of people have significant other working outside to supplement unless you have many bedrooms. If you factor in the amount of hours you will work you will be working for minimum wage if that.
 

seashanty

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I am saying this off the top of my head as I have no figures for you - however, I doubt if there IS an average. it would depend on the size of the property, duties expected, occupancy, location, etc. So many variables. It would also depend on what the innkeepers expect to receive as a "living wage" for their needs/wants. 2-man operation or staff, yard work or none......
HI! and thank you for your reply. I have kind of looked out there on the Internet and found that you are right - lots of variables can determine the salary. I've seen a median salary of $41,000. But the variables make me wonder if this figure is a total of the living quarters + monetary, or if that is in addition to, or if that is the salary per person ion a team - or the total overall salary for the team. I don't see many job ads that say: "Compensation includes $41,000 + living quarter and utilities." They usually say something like, "Salary + living quarters...." So that leaves me with little to go on, ya know? Thanks anyways.
.
ServingSouthernComfort said:
I've seen a median salary of $41,000.
i started up and ran an 8 room b&b 2005-2009 from start to finish when it was put on the market. the place was a neglected and closed 'wreck' when i got there and all it had was the reputation of being a dump to go along with it and potential. if someone had offered me even 1/2 that salary at the time, i'd have stayed on.
my background?
degress in business management, years of office and business management, accounting, supervising staff, etc.
at the b&b, i had to learn it all. attended one innkeeping course and came to the folks at this forum who gave me a wealth of information, suggestions and support. then i jumped in.
i did it all from obtaining construction permits to hiring contractors, supervising construction, pulling out and disposing of broken toilets, getting rid of rodents and insects, getting licensed, getting an approved sign, building a website, joining associations, finding out how to attract guests, buying groceries, supplies and furnishings, decorating and scrounging for used furnishings to fit out the rooms and common areas, finding and negotiating contracts with vendors. finding (and trying to keep) some housekeeping and lawn mowing help, cleaning rooms including toilets, planning, cooking, serving and cleaning up after breakfasts, marketing, advertising, reservations, dealing with middle of the night guest issues, bargaining with an adult son to live in the place - be my handyman and help out in the middle of the night.
you name it i did it. over and over again.
running an eight room place is like keeping your own little house in pristine condition at all times multiplied by eight and having a continuous stream of houseguests who are rough with the windows, furnishings and appliances. one toilet clogs or the gizmo breaks ... you get it fixed and something comes loose in the next room ... all the time. it's part of the business.
i was exhausted and tied to the place. trial and error. again and again. i made very little money and should have fought for more, much more, but i entered it during a crisis in my life and i did the best i could under the circumstances so i have no regrets. there was a lot i loved about the job - playing hostess and meeting new people all the time. i hear of places that are turn key or looking for a live in innkeeper with a nice bedroom and staff and my eyes glaze over ...
a team of two has to be better than solo. the more 'stuff' already permitted, grandfathered and in place the better.
good luck!
 

JBloggs

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There is really no way to answer that. I depends, is the answer. How many rooms? How much work will you do (everything from cleaning the rooms to all maintenance or will you have staff?) What is the occupancy rate?
Do you think you should get the same amount if you have a 10 room inn vs a 5 room inn? You might be surprised at the answer, wherein the 10 room inn will have more staff, and less labor for yourselves to do.
The real question is "How much are they willing to pay?" :)
 

birdwatcher

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Southern-We are a husband and wife team that owned a B & B for four years and circumstances some beyond our control and some of our control we had to close the business. We liked what we were doing so we diligently searched for Innkeeping positions and it took us many interviews and letters and e-mails but we did land one and out of kind of desperation because the job market was low and because we could do the job we took it. In retrospect we had no idea what kind of boss we would have because the boss was an absentee owner that micromanaged the staff that managed to stay here. In short, we decided two months into the job to start searching for another position-this was a year ago.
We do have another position that we are going to in November and it seems like a good partnership, although we really won't know until we get there; we asked questions and we are satisfied with the salary. There are many types of B & B's and most do include innkeeper's quarters which is included in your salary, but like Alibi mentioned there are too many variables to say that there is a salary that can be made at every Inn and it also depends on what you will be doing. I can tell you this-if you were to be hired as "management" instead of an "innkeeper" which will be jack and jill of all trades-that Inn would be making alot of revenue to pay the management, lawn service, housekeepers, cooks etc all year long. Keep in mind that being innkeepets is a 24/7 job, its not a 9-5 job and as someone else mentioned-you should consider going to some seminars and such. We were baptized by fire meaning we went and we owned one and actually learned alot, now being hired by an Inn we learned different things.
If you want more info dont hesitate to e-mail me. Good luck
 

ServingSouthernComfort

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Southern-We are a husband and wife team that owned a B & B for four years and circumstances some beyond our control and some of our control we had to close the business. We liked what we were doing so we diligently searched for Innkeeping positions and it took us many interviews and letters and e-mails but we did land one and out of kind of desperation because the job market was low and because we could do the job we took it. In retrospect we had no idea what kind of boss we would have because the boss was an absentee owner that micromanaged the staff that managed to stay here. In short, we decided two months into the job to start searching for another position-this was a year ago.
We do have another position that we are going to in November and it seems like a good partnership, although we really won't know until we get there; we asked questions and we are satisfied with the salary. There are many types of B & B's and most do include innkeeper's quarters which is included in your salary, but like Alibi mentioned there are too many variables to say that there is a salary that can be made at every Inn and it also depends on what you will be doing. I can tell you this-if you were to be hired as "management" instead of an "innkeeper" which will be jack and jill of all trades-that Inn would be making alot of revenue to pay the management, lawn service, housekeepers, cooks etc all year long. Keep in mind that being innkeepets is a 24/7 job, its not a 9-5 job and as someone else mentioned-you should consider going to some seminars and such. We were baptized by fire meaning we went and we owned one and actually learned alot, now being hired by an Inn we learned different things.
If you want more info dont hesitate to e-mail me. Good luck.
Thank you, Birdwatcher, for your kind reply and for the encouragement. We really want to do this. We have talked about it and been reading about it for years. We have done some homework around this, talked to people who know a little about the business. My husband has computer reservations systems experience from leisure and corporate travel. So - we feel like if someone is willing to give us an opportunity - we really would like to give it all we have and see if this is for us. And in fact, we are in the interviewing process with a wonderful couple who seem to be interested in taking some business savvy, customer service focused, aspiring innkeepers and teach them the ropes. I hope the situation is not as some of the others have suggested and that they simply want to take advantage of us. We hope not. But, I guess if we take no risks then we don't have the chance to experience the blessing that may be available to us in this. So we are stepping out in Faith.
The potentials have asked what we think would be a fair salary - hence the question to you all about salary. I so appreciate your warm invitation to email you for more information. Blessings!
 

ServingSouthernComfort

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There is really no way to answer that. I depends, is the answer. How many rooms? How much work will you do (everything from cleaning the rooms to all maintenance or will you have staff?) What is the occupancy rate?
Do you think you should get the same amount if you have a 10 room inn vs a 5 room inn? You might be surprised at the answer, wherein the 10 room inn will have more staff, and less labor for yourselves to do.
The real question is "How much are they willing to pay?" :).
"The real question is "How much are they willing to pay?" Love, love, love this answer! So help me know how to get this information. They have asked us what we think is a fair salary....I HATE that interview question. I would so appreciate your suggestions.
 

ServingSouthernComfort

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I am saying this off the top of my head as I have no figures for you - however, I doubt if there IS an average. it would depend on the size of the property, duties expected, occupancy, location, etc. So many variables. It would also depend on what the innkeepers expect to receive as a "living wage" for their needs/wants. 2-man operation or staff, yard work or none......
HI! and thank you for your reply. I have kind of looked out there on the Internet and found that you are right - lots of variables can determine the salary. I've seen a median salary of $41,000. But the variables make me wonder if this figure is a total of the living quarters + monetary, or if that is in addition to, or if that is the salary per person ion a team - or the total overall salary for the team. I don't see many job ads that say: "Compensation includes $41,000 + living quarter and utilities." They usually say something like, "Salary + living quarters...." So that leaves me with little to go on, ya know? Thanks anyways.
.
ServingSouthernComfort said:
I've seen a median salary of $41,000.
i started up and ran an 8 room b&b 2005-2009 from start to finish when it was put on the market. the place was a neglected and closed 'wreck' when i got there and all it had was the reputation of being a dump to go along with it and potential. if someone had offered me even 1/2 that salary at the time, i'd have stayed on.
my background?
degress in business management, years of office and business management, accounting, supervising staff, etc.
at the b&b, i had to learn it all. attended one innkeeping course and came to the folks at this forum who gave me a wealth of information, suggestions and support. then i jumped in.
i did it all from obtaining construction permits to hiring contractors, supervising construction, pulling out and disposing of broken toilets, getting rid of rodents and insects, getting licensed, getting an approved sign, building a website, joining associations, finding out how to attract guests, buying groceries, supplies and furnishings, decorating and scrounging for used furnishings to fit out the rooms and common areas, finding and negotiating contracts with vendors. finding (and trying to keep) some housekeeping and lawn mowing help, cleaning rooms including toilets, planning, cooking, serving and cleaning up after breakfasts, marketing, advertising, reservations, dealing with middle of the night guest issues, bargaining with an adult son to live in the place - be my handyman and help out in the middle of the night.
you name it i did it. over and over again.
running an eight room place is like keeping your own little house in pristine condition at all times multiplied by eight and having a continuous stream of houseguests who are rough with the windows, furnishings and appliances. one toilet clogs or the gizmo breaks ... you get it fixed and something comes loose in the next room ... all the time. it's part of the business.
i was exhausted and tied to the place. trial and error. again and again. i made very little money and should have fought for more, much more, but i entered it during a crisis in my life and i did the best i could under the circumstances so i have no regrets. there was a lot i loved about the job - playing hostess and meeting new people all the time. i hear of places that are turn key or looking for a live in innkeeper with a nice bedroom and staff and my eyes glaze over ...
a team of two has to be better than solo. the more 'stuff' already permitted, grandfathered and in place the better.
good luck!
.
I don't think I understand anything you have said here, but thank you for your reply.
I have not stated anywhere whether or not I think $41,000 is a good salary or a low salary...it is just what is reported as the median average pay on the US Bureau of Labor and Statistics website. In the catagory it kind of lumps up innkeepers, hotel managers, B&B managers or innkeepers - so that is a wide scope and so I am not so sure it is very accurate; hence, I came here to ask the question.
 

seashanty

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I am saying this off the top of my head as I have no figures for you - however, I doubt if there IS an average. it would depend on the size of the property, duties expected, occupancy, location, etc. So many variables. It would also depend on what the innkeepers expect to receive as a "living wage" for their needs/wants. 2-man operation or staff, yard work or none......
HI! and thank you for your reply. I have kind of looked out there on the Internet and found that you are right - lots of variables can determine the salary. I've seen a median salary of $41,000. But the variables make me wonder if this figure is a total of the living quarters + monetary, or if that is in addition to, or if that is the salary per person ion a team - or the total overall salary for the team. I don't see many job ads that say: "Compensation includes $41,000 + living quarter and utilities." They usually say something like, "Salary + living quarters...." So that leaves me with little to go on, ya know? Thanks anyways.
.
ServingSouthernComfort said:
I've seen a median salary of $41,000.
i started up and ran an 8 room b&b 2005-2009 from start to finish when it was put on the market. the place was a neglected and closed 'wreck' when i got there and all it had was the reputation of being a dump to go along with it and potential. if someone had offered me even 1/2 that salary at the time, i'd have stayed on.
my background?
degress in business management, years of office and business management, accounting, supervising staff, etc.
at the b&b, i had to learn it all. attended one innkeeping course and came to the folks at this forum who gave me a wealth of information, suggestions and support. then i jumped in.
i did it all from obtaining construction permits to hiring contractors, supervising construction, pulling out and disposing of broken toilets, getting rid of rodents and insects, getting licensed, getting an approved sign, building a website, joining associations, finding out how to attract guests, buying groceries, supplies and furnishings, decorating and scrounging for used furnishings to fit out the rooms and common areas, finding and negotiating contracts with vendors. finding (and trying to keep) some housekeeping and lawn mowing help, cleaning rooms including toilets, planning, cooking, serving and cleaning up after breakfasts, marketing, advertising, reservations, dealing with middle of the night guest issues, bargaining with an adult son to live in the place - be my handyman and help out in the middle of the night.
you name it i did it. over and over again.
running an eight room place is like keeping your own little house in pristine condition at all times multiplied by eight and having a continuous stream of houseguests who are rough with the windows, furnishings and appliances. one toilet clogs or the gizmo breaks ... you get it fixed and something comes loose in the next room ... all the time. it's part of the business.
i was exhausted and tied to the place. trial and error. again and again. i made very little money and should have fought for more, much more, but i entered it during a crisis in my life and i did the best i could under the circumstances so i have no regrets. there was a lot i loved about the job - playing hostess and meeting new people all the time. i hear of places that are turn key or looking for a live in innkeeper with a nice bedroom and staff and my eyes glaze over ...
a team of two has to be better than solo. the more 'stuff' already permitted, grandfathered and in place the better.
good luck!
.
I don't think I understand anything you have said here, but thank you for your reply.
I have not stated anywhere whether or not I think $41,000 is a good salary or a low salary...it is just what is reported as the median average pay on the US Bureau of Labor and Statistics website. In the catagory it kind of lumps up innkeepers, hotel managers, B&B managers or innkeepers - so that is a wide scope and so I am not so sure it is very accurate; hence, I came here to ask the question.
.
well, i am confused.
i don't know if this post is in reponse to my post or not. if you are saying to me that you don't think you understand anything i have said here .... why? i was telling you everything i did all day long, every single day ... and for all that i did i was telling you my pay was very, very low. and that if i'd been offered half the amount in your post, wherever the amount was quoted from, i'd have stayed on til the place sold.
i have heard of compensation that far exceeded mine for less work, both physical and deskwork, so the range is huge.
 

egoodell

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I am saying this off the top of my head as I have no figures for you - however, I doubt if there IS an average. it would depend on the size of the property, duties expected, occupancy, location, etc. So many variables. It would also depend on what the innkeepers expect to receive as a "living wage" for their needs/wants. 2-man operation or staff, yard work or none......
HI! and thank you for your reply. I have kind of looked out there on the Internet and found that you are right - lots of variables can determine the salary. I've seen a median salary of $41,000. But the variables make me wonder if this figure is a total of the living quarters + monetary, or if that is in addition to, or if that is the salary per person ion a team - or the total overall salary for the team. I don't see many job ads that say: "Compensation includes $41,000 + living quarter and utilities." They usually say something like, "Salary + living quarters...." So that leaves me with little to go on, ya know? Thanks anyways.
.
ServingSouthernComfort said:
I've seen a median salary of $41,000.
i started up and ran an 8 room b&b 2005-2009 from start to finish when it was put on the market. the place was a neglected and closed 'wreck' when i got there and all it had was the reputation of being a dump to go along with it and potential. if someone had offered me even 1/2 that salary at the time, i'd have stayed on.
my background?
degress in business management, years of office and business management, accounting, supervising staff, etc.
at the b&b, i had to learn it all. attended one innkeeping course and came to the folks at this forum who gave me a wealth of information, suggestions and support. then i jumped in.
i did it all from obtaining construction permits to hiring contractors, supervising construction, pulling out and disposing of broken toilets, getting rid of rodents and insects, getting licensed, getting an approved sign, building a website, joining associations, finding out how to attract guests, buying groceries, supplies and furnishings, decorating and scrounging for used furnishings to fit out the rooms and common areas, finding and negotiating contracts with vendors. finding (and trying to keep) some housekeeping and lawn mowing help, cleaning rooms including toilets, planning, cooking, serving and cleaning up after breakfasts, marketing, advertising, reservations, dealing with middle of the night guest issues, bargaining with an adult son to live in the place - be my handyman and help out in the middle of the night.
you name it i did it. over and over again.
running an eight room place is like keeping your own little house in pristine condition at all times multiplied by eight and having a continuous stream of houseguests who are rough with the windows, furnishings and appliances. one toilet clogs or the gizmo breaks ... you get it fixed and something comes loose in the next room ... all the time. it's part of the business.
i was exhausted and tied to the place. trial and error. again and again. i made very little money and should have fought for more, much more, but i entered it during a crisis in my life and i did the best i could under the circumstances so i have no regrets. there was a lot i loved about the job - playing hostess and meeting new people all the time. i hear of places that are turn key or looking for a live in innkeeper with a nice bedroom and staff and my eyes glaze over ...
a team of two has to be better than solo. the more 'stuff' already permitted, grandfathered and in place the better.
good luck!
.
I don't think I understand anything you have said here, but thank you for your reply.
I have not stated anywhere whether or not I think $41,000 is a good salary or a low salary...it is just what is reported as the median average pay on the US Bureau of Labor and Statistics website. In the catagory it kind of lumps up innkeepers, hotel managers, B&B managers or innkeepers - so that is a wide scope and so I am not so sure it is very accurate; hence, I came here to ask the question.
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ServingSouthernComfort said:
I don't think I understand anything you have said here, but thank you for your reply.
I have not stated anywhere whether or not I think $41,000 is a good salary or a low salary...it is just what is reported as the median average pay on the US Bureau of Labor and Statistics website. In the catagory it kind of lumps up innkeepers, hotel managers, B&B managers or innkeepers - so that is a wide scope and so I am not so sure it is very accurate; hence, I came here to ask the question.
I can tell you that no innkeeper in this town make $41,000. And I'll bet those statistics are not from since the economy tanked.
RIki
 

Alibi Ike

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There is really no way to answer that. I depends, is the answer. How many rooms? How much work will you do (everything from cleaning the rooms to all maintenance or will you have staff?) What is the occupancy rate?
Do you think you should get the same amount if you have a 10 room inn vs a 5 room inn? You might be surprised at the answer, wherein the 10 room inn will have more staff, and less labor for yourselves to do.
The real question is "How much are they willing to pay?" :).
"The real question is "How much are they willing to pay?" Love, love, love this answer! So help me know how to get this information. They have asked us what we think is a fair salary....I HATE that interview question. I would so appreciate your suggestions.
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ServingSouthernComfort said:
"The real question is "How much are they willing to pay?" Love, love, love this answer! So help me know how to get this information. They have asked us what we think is a fair salary....I HATE that interview question. I would so appreciate your suggestions.
You need more info from them. What do they expect you to do while running the inn? What are the gross receipts for the inn? You can get a fair idea of what the AREA does by getting the lodging tax data from the state for that town and then figuring out how many rooms are in that town and what the ADR is. (Sometimes the state website will also break that down for you.)
Do they presently have an innkeeper/couple? Why is that innkeeper leaving? How many innkeepers have they gone thru? (Might give you an idea of wht they are like to work for.) How is the inn perceived in the town? Will you have difficulty getting anyone to work with you because they've been burned by the owners/previous innkeepers?
 

Alibi Ike

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I am saying this off the top of my head as I have no figures for you - however, I doubt if there IS an average. it would depend on the size of the property, duties expected, occupancy, location, etc. So many variables. It would also depend on what the innkeepers expect to receive as a "living wage" for their needs/wants. 2-man operation or staff, yard work or none......
HI! and thank you for your reply. I have kind of looked out there on the Internet and found that you are right - lots of variables can determine the salary. I've seen a median salary of $41,000. But the variables make me wonder if this figure is a total of the living quarters + monetary, or if that is in addition to, or if that is the salary per person ion a team - or the total overall salary for the team. I don't see many job ads that say: "Compensation includes $41,000 + living quarter and utilities." They usually say something like, "Salary + living quarters...." So that leaves me with little to go on, ya know? Thanks anyways.
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ServingSouthernComfort said:
I've seen a median salary of $41,000.
i started up and ran an 8 room b&b 2005-2009 from start to finish when it was put on the market. the place was a neglected and closed 'wreck' when i got there and all it had was the reputation of being a dump to go along with it and potential. if someone had offered me even 1/2 that salary at the time, i'd have stayed on.
my background?
degress in business management, years of office and business management, accounting, supervising staff, etc.
at the b&b, i had to learn it all. attended one innkeeping course and came to the folks at this forum who gave me a wealth of information, suggestions and support. then i jumped in.
i did it all from obtaining construction permits to hiring contractors, supervising construction, pulling out and disposing of broken toilets, getting rid of rodents and insects, getting licensed, getting an approved sign, building a website, joining associations, finding out how to attract guests, buying groceries, supplies and furnishings, decorating and scrounging for used furnishings to fit out the rooms and common areas, finding and negotiating contracts with vendors. finding (and trying to keep) some housekeeping and lawn mowing help, cleaning rooms including toilets, planning, cooking, serving and cleaning up after breakfasts, marketing, advertising, reservations, dealing with middle of the night guest issues, bargaining with an adult son to live in the place - be my handyman and help out in the middle of the night.
you name it i did it. over and over again.
running an eight room place is like keeping your own little house in pristine condition at all times multiplied by eight and having a continuous stream of houseguests who are rough with the windows, furnishings and appliances. one toilet clogs or the gizmo breaks ... you get it fixed and something comes loose in the next room ... all the time. it's part of the business.
i was exhausted and tied to the place. trial and error. again and again. i made very little money and should have fought for more, much more, but i entered it during a crisis in my life and i did the best i could under the circumstances so i have no regrets. there was a lot i loved about the job - playing hostess and meeting new people all the time. i hear of places that are turn key or looking for a live in innkeeper with a nice bedroom and staff and my eyes glaze over ...
a team of two has to be better than solo. the more 'stuff' already permitted, grandfathered and in place the better.
good luck!
.
I don't think I understand anything you have said here, but thank you for your reply.
I have not stated anywhere whether or not I think $41,000 is a good salary or a low salary...it is just what is reported as the median average pay on the US Bureau of Labor and Statistics website. In the catagory it kind of lumps up innkeepers, hotel managers, B&B managers or innkeepers - so that is a wide scope and so I am not so sure it is very accurate; hence, I came here to ask the question.
.
ServingSouthernComfort said:
I don't think I understand anything you have said here, but thank you for your reply.
I have not stated anywhere whether or not I think $41,000 is a good salary or a low salary...it is just what is reported as the median average pay on the US Bureau of Labor and Statistics website. In the catagory it kind of lumps up innkeepers, hotel managers, B&B managers or innkeepers - so that is a wide scope and so I am not so sure it is very accurate; hence, I came here to ask the question.
We have a guest who manages a boutique hotel in NYC. He is definitely skewing the $41k to the much higher side. Much higher. 6 figures. So, if that number takes into account hotel managers, you're looking at people who are making 6 figures to manage very posh hotels lumped in with the folks at the desk at Motel 6. And the rest of us fall somewhere in between.
So, again, before you can throw out a number, you need to know who the clientele at the inn are. Are you dealing with folks who expect perfection or are they casual travelers? The higher the guest expectations, the higher your salary should be. If you are on call 24x7 for the kinds of expectations these guests will have, you need to be compensated.
Will you be expected to walk their dogs, have their car serviced, laundry? You've got to know what you'll be handling to know what the job is worth to the owners to have it done properly.
 
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